Try It!

KidsMake: Magnetic Tracks

Take and Makes for this project will be available starting this Friday, Sept. 18, 2020 at PPLD Libraries and are recommended for kids, ages 5-12.

Supplies:

  • Paper or paper plate
  • Markers or crayons
  • Glue or glue dot or 2-sided tape
  • Magnet
  • Craft stick

Directions:

  1. Use the provided paper or your own supplies to draw a shape to race around on your magnet track. You might choose a vehicle (car, truck, train, boat, etc.), an animal (cow, fish, turtle, dog, etc.), or something entirely different. It should be small enough to go on your paper plate (less than 2 inches).
  2. Attach a magnet to the back using double-sided tape or a glue dot.
  3. Use your own markers, crayons, or colored pencils to create a course on your race track.
  4. Use double-sided tape or a glue to to attach a magnet to the end of your craft stick. Before you glue, you need to make sure that the magnet on the car and the magnet on the stick attract rather than repel each other. If they repel each other, turn the magnet for the stick over before attaching.
  5. Test your track! Set your shape (vehicle, animal, or other) on your track. Use the magnet on the craft stick under the plate to move and race the car.

Have fun!

Find the tutorial video at https://ppld.librarymarket.com/virtual-kidsmake-magnetic-race-tracks

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STEM: Solar Science

Supplies:

In Take and Make kit (pick up a kit starting 9/11/20 at any PPLD Library, while supplies last)

  • UV beads
  • Pipe cleaner
  • Paper plate
  • Pencil
  • Black construction paper
  • Template pdf below

You supply:

  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Clock face template (pdf to print below)
  • Natural objects from outside: rocks, weeds, flowers, leaves, etc.

Directions:

  1. UV beads illustrate some of the harmful effects of the sun and therefore, why we use sunscreen. UV light is one type of light from the sun. We can’t see it, but insects and birds can. While this UV light can help our bodies produce Vitamin D, too much of it can also cause sunburn or skin damage. Take the UV beads in your kit and string them on a pipe cleaner to make a bracelet. Go outside to watch them react to the UV rays – even on a cloudy day. You might also want to experiment with sunscreen, sunglasses, or windows and see what happens!
  2. You can also use the power of the sun, construction paper, and natural objects to create a work of art. Take your piece of paper and place it in a sunny place. You may need to weight it down. Place natural objects on the paper and leave it all in the sun for several hours. The UV rays of the sun help break down the dye in the paper creating your design. We found that we had to tape down some of the objects so they didn’t blow away. If you use tape, be careful that it doesn’t show.
  3. Next, you can make a sundial clock. Decorate the plate if you’d like. Cut out and glue the clock face to the back side of the plate. Poke the pencil through the center of the plate and take it outside. You’ll need to place the clock with the “12” facing north to determine the correct time. Watch how your clock tells time during the day.

These activities are based on:

http://solar-center.stanford.edu/activities/UVBeads/UV-Bead-Instructions...

https://www.scholastic.com/parents/school-success/learning-toolkit-blog/...

https://www.raisingarizonakids.com/2015/06/how-to-make-sundial-clock/

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Water Balloon Parachute

TAKE AND MAKE: Water Balloon Parachute
Can your water balloons survive a big drop? Find out with this experiment.
Pick up your Take and Make kit at PPLD Libraries starting September 4, 2020

Supplies:

  • One balloon
  • Water
  • One plastic shopping bag
  • One rubber band

Directions:

  1. Add water to your balloon, don't fill the balloon, leave lots of room to tie the balloon closed.
  2. Cut the ends of the handles of the bags. Tie or rubber band them to the knotted end of a water balloon.
  3. Go outside and drop it from a high place to see if it breaks when it lands.
  4. Test and retest until your balloon breaks.
  5. Try it again with another balloon.

See what else you can attach to your parachute and let drop.

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Tween Twist: Banned Books Wearables (Mini-Charms)

Link to tutorial on YouTube: https://youtu.be/vJyL_xqPI0E

Supplies needed:

  • Book template printed on cardstock
  • Book cover printed on paper
  • Glue Stick
  • Blank paper
  • Needle & thread
  • Jump ring
  • Optional: Key chain ring or necklace chord

Directions:

  1. Cut out a cardstock book template and the book cover of your choice (see pdf files below).
  2. Use the glue stick to glue the cover to the book template.
  3. Crease the flaps around the edges.
  4. Cut out 4-6 rectangles that you will fold in half to make the book’s pages. You can eyeball this, but they will be approximately 4.75 cm x 3.5 cm.
  5. Line up the pages and fold in half. This stack of folded pages is called a “signature”. Trim if necessary so that the pages fit in the book.
  6. Thread a needle with about 6 inches of thread.
  7. Sew the pages together with a pamphlet stitch. You will be poking 3 holes in the crease of the folded pages: one in the top, one in the middle, and one in the bottom. You can mark these holes with pencil beforehand if you would like to.
  8. Start by poking the needle in through the middle of the crease (see picture). The needle should go through the back of the pages and come out inside the inner fold. Leave a couple of inches of thread hanging out the back. Hold these 3 inches while you sew and do not let them pull through. You will be tying a knot with them at the end.
  9. Push the needle up through the top of the pages (inside to outside).
  10. Go back down near the bottom of the pages (outside to inside).
  11. Pull the needle one last time through the center hole.
  12. Use the thread you left hanging out the back and the thread still on the needle to tie a square knot—right over left, then left over right.
  13. Flip the cover template over, line up the pages of the signature you’ve just sewn, and use a glue stick to glue the leftmost and rightmost pages of the signature to the inside of the template.
  14. Run your glue stick over all the tabs of the cover template and then press them onto the two glued pages until the folio is fully secured to the cover template on both sides.
  15. Fold both sides of the spine with your fingers to finish your book!
  16. Now use the needle to poke a hole through the top of the spine all the way through to the inside. Widen the hole by wiggling the needle.
  17. Open a jump ring with your fingers by holding it in front of you and pulling one side forward while you push the other back. Do not open by pulling the sides outward or it will not fully close.
  18. Poke the jump ring through the hole you’ve created. You may have to go back and widen the hole further. At this point, you can attach a key ring to it or string it on a chord to make a necklace. Close the jump ring when you’re done!
  19. Voila! You have a miniature book charm. If you want it to lay flat, you can place it under a light object/between two objects overnight to make it stay fully closed. You could optionally paint it with mod podge to keep it safe from wear and tear!

Show off what you've made by entering our PPLD Challenge: Banned Books Art.

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Kids STEM: Density Burrito

Supplies:

  • Tall, clear glass cylinder vase or container (preferably straight)
  • Food coloring
  • Measuring cup
  • Order of liquids needed for this density "burrito" (but you could do less liquid choices, but make sure to start with a heavy liquid and end with the lightest liquid):
    • Honey
    • Corn Syrup (add a couple drops of food coloring)
    • Maple Syrup
    • Whole Milk
    • Dish Soap
    • Water (add a couple drops of food coloring)
    • Vegetable Oil (add a couple drops of food coloring)
    • Rubbing Alcohol (add a couple drops of food coloring)
    • Lamp Oil (DO NOT add food coloring to this liquid - it's doesn't mix in.)
  • Tray
  • Turkey Baster
  • Items to sink or float: ping-pong ball, plastic beads, metal bolt, grape or cherry tomato, etc.

Directions:

  1. Determine how many ounces your container holds with room to spare at the top. Round up or down to a number that can easily be divided your number of liquid layers. Measure the exact amount of liquid ingredients into separate containers. (My large container held about 32 oz. leaving room at the top, so I divided 32 by 9, and then rounded the number down to a 1/3 c. of each liquid to make it easy to measure. Have a grown-up help you, especially with the lamp oil.)
  2. Place the large container on the tray.
  3. Add the liquids IN ORDER (they go from most dense to least dense).
  4. Starting with the honey, pour it very slowly so that it doesn't touch the sides of the container.
  5. Next, very slowly, dribble the corn syrup on top of the honey. Don't let it touch the sides of the container either.
  6. Again like the first two, slowly dribble the maple syrup into the container on top of the corn syrup.
  7. Using the turkey baster, add the milk very slowly. Now it helps to pour the liquids slowly down the sides of the container as you add them. You will add the next five liquids in the same manner.
  8. When all the liquids are in place. Add items and watch them sink or float or get stuck, depending on their weight and the density of the liquid where it stops.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/QjEYa6xBVRQ?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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Kids MAKE: Ninja Warriors


Supplies:


  • 3 chenille stems for each figure
  • 1 wooden bead big enough to be the head – 5/8 to 3/4 inch
  • 1 or 2 regular-sized colored plastic drinking straws for each figure
  • 5 pony beads for each figure
  • Small wire cutters
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Permanent markers for the face
  • Glue
  • Optional: Yarn, extra chenille stems, felt scraps, or other decorative items


Directions:

  1. Take one of the chenille stems and twist it around the other two about 2/3 of the way up; twist about three times, or enough so that they will not unwind. (See #1 picture below)
  2. Slide 3 pony beads over both of the “legs” up to the twist you made.
  3. With the permanent marker, draw a face on the bead; then slide the bead down over the middle two stems.(See #2 picture)
  4. Cut off some of the excess stem above the bead, but leave enough to coil it into a bun. Use a little glue to glue the bun flat to the “head.” (Alternate method: Cut several strands of yarn for hair and twist the excess stem over it to hold it in place.)
  5. With the scissors, snip eight sections of colored straw about 1 ¼ inches long.
  6. Slide two of the sections over the “arms.” Twist the part of the stem that is sticking out to form mitten-type hands with thumbs. Tuck the excess stem back into the straw. (See #3 and #4 pictures)
  7. Slide a section of the straw over each “leg;” add a pony bead, and then the other section of straw. Form the part of the stem that is sticking out into a big foot so your figure can stand up. Tuck the excess stem back into the straw.
  8. If you want, you can decorate your figure with extra chenille stems, felt, yarn, or whatever you happen to have. You can make warriors, princesses, superheroes, knights – anything you want! (See #5 picture)
ninja 1
ninja 2
ninja 3
ninja 4
ninja 5

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/UnGxbypCuBw?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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All Pikes Peak Makes: Call for Makers

Explore the world of making this October with All Pikes Peak Makes! Due to COVID-19, this event is going virtual for 2020!

A maker is someone who creates - to be innovative, to solve problems, to bring something beautiful into the world, or simply to have fun. They have an idea and they bring it to life. Making can encompass just about anything, from high tech to low tech to no tech, from art to fabrication to artistic fabrication, from needles to table saws to software.

Celebrate making with us!

These events are in partnership with Cool Science.

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Kids STEM: Bubble Magic

Supplies:

For solution:

  • Clean container, big enough to hold your solution
  • Distilled water (tap water will work but distilled water is best)
  • Dishwashing liquid like Dawn
  • Glycerin
  • White sugar

For Bubble cube:

  • 7 pipe cleaners, cut in half
  • 12 plastic straws, each one cut to fit a pipe cleaner half, with about ¼-½” of pipe cleaner left exposed at each end
  • For the bubble blower, you’ll need a plastic pipette. Just snip ½” off the bulb end of the
    pipette. This is the end you’ll dip into the bubble solution.

Directions:

  1. Start with a clean container that will hold as much solution as you plan to make.
  2. Add distilled water (tap water can be substituted, but the minerals in it will affect the bubbles), in 1 cup increments.
  3. For each cup of distilled water, add 2 Tbsp of dishwashing liquid (original Dawn works really well).
  4. For each cup of distilled water, add 1 Tbsp of glycerin (grocery story grade, or pharmaceutical grade).
  5. For each cup of distilled water, add 1 tsp of white sugar.
  6. Gently stir the ingredients in the container, being careful not to make it frothy and bubbly.
  7. Cover the container and place it in the refrigerator overnight.

Meanwhile... make a bubble cube and a bubble blower for your Bubble Magic …

  1. Twist 3 of the pipe cleaner halves together at one end to make a triangular, pyramid-shaped component. Use 12 of the pipe cleaner halves to make a total of 4 of these three-legged pieces.
  2. Slide a piece of straw onto each pipe cleaner leg, leaving ¼-½”” sticking out of the open end.
  3. To build the cube, twist each pipe cleaner end on one component to the ends on another component. Continue connecting the legs until the cube is complete. Try to make the shape as even as possible.
  4. Use the last two pieces of pipe cleaner for handles by twisting each piece onto the cube at opposite corners. Curve the “handle” ends to make a shape that you can easily hold onto.

Now to make Bubble Magic …

  1. Get the cold bubble solution from the refrigerator, and carefully stir the mixture. Avoid making froth and bubbles. Whenever that forms on the top, take a minute to skim it off with a spoon so that you’ll get better bubbles with your cube.
  2. Dip your cube into the solution, letting it sit there for a few seconds, and lift it out by holding on to the two handles. Gently shake the cube so that the soap film can even itself out and excess solution can drip back into your container.
  3. Gently shake the cube again so that you can see a new shape, with a “square” bubble in the center. Be sure the “square” is horizontal so that you can see the square when you look down into the cube from above it.
  4. Set the cube gently on a flat surface to keep the bubble film stable while you prepare a bubble with your pipette bubble blower, or ask a friend to blow a bubble with the pipette.
  5. Blow a pipette bubble and gently drop it right into the center of the square. And ...

TA-DAH! The round bubble you dropped into the cube “magically” turned into a bulging cube … a square bubble. Now that’s Bubble Magic!
*You can also use your bubble cube as a wand. Submerse it in the solution, lift it out carefully, and holding the handles, “pull” it through the air. Watch for a trail of connected spherical shapes!

Watch this project at : https://youtu.be/iY_0gSND-40?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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Kids Make: Black Glue Butterflies

Supplies:

  • A piece of 8 ½ X 11 white cardstock
  • Watercolor paints
  • School glue
  • Small bottle of black acrylic craft paint
  • Small paintbrush
  • Cup of water for rinsing your paintbrush

Directions:

  1. Print the half butterfly image provided (see below) onto your cardstock. Fold the cardstock exactly in half and then unfold to make a crease in the middle. (Alternate method: Draw a butterfly picture onto half of your cardstock with a pencil putting the exact middle of the butterfly on the crease.)
  2. Make black glue by adding black acrylic craft paint to a small bottle of plain school glue until a dark, black color is achieved. Mix well.
  3. Using the tip of the glue nozzle, trace a fine line of glue onto all of the printed lines of the butterfly picture. Don’t use too much glue! Put the glue on only the half of the picture with the copied lines. Leave the other half blank.
  4. Fold the paper in half again while the glue is wet and press together gently. Then open up the cardstock. The pattern you traced will now be duplicated on the other half of the cardstock.
  5. Let the glue dry. You can speed up the process by using a blow dryer on low heat to gently dry the glue.
  6. When the glue is completely dry, use your watercolors to color in all of the white sections. You can decide which colors to use!

Oops! My butterfly isn’t exactly the same on both sides. That’s okay! Real butterflies’ wings aren’t exactly the same on both sides, either! Just like with people’s faces, one side is slightly different than the other.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/Gimm3roL-3Q

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Kids STEM: Firefly Jar

Supplies:

  • Clean, clear jar with lid
  • Thin glow stick
  • Scissors
  • Table covering or tray
  • Glitter (optional)

Directions:

  1. With a grown-up's help, cut the tip off the glow stick.
  2. Place the open end of the glow stick in the jar and shake it back and forth so that it splatters. Turn the jar as you splatter.
  3. Add a small pinch of glitter, sprinkling onto the sides of the jar where the splatters are.
  4. Cover with lid and take into a very dark room.

Fireflies are not flies but beetles and do exist in Colorado! They hang out by permanent water sources like ponds, lakes, and streams.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/LRNWJVQRFYw

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Kids Make: Sewing and Embroidering Fun

Supplies:

  • Embroidery or regular thread
  • Piece of cotton fabric or item made of cotton
  • Sewing needle
  • Scissors
  • Sharpie or other dark marker

Directions:

  1. Using a sharpie, mark dots on your fabric which will guide you as you sew your design.
  2. Thread your needle by pushing thread through the eye of the needle. Make a knot at the end of your piece of thread.
  3. Start on the wrong side of your fabric or on the inside of your item, and push the needle up through the fabric through your starting dot. Bring all the thread through, slowly, making sure the thread doesn't tangle.
  4. Go to the next dot in your design and push the needle down through that dot, bringing all the thread through again.
  5. Continue until your first design is complete. Finish your design by weaving your needle through the thread on the wrong side of the fabric several times, making a couple loops so the thread will be secure. Cut the thread.
  6. Re-thread for the next design or continue if you have enough thread on your needle.
  7. Enjoy your original design!

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/5tX-0F2bAsA

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Kids STEM: Ice Volcanoes

Supplies:

  • Baking soda (1/3 c.)
  • Vinegar
  • Small bowl
  • Golf ball or other small ball that sinks and doesn't float
  • Tray
  • Paper towels
  • Warm water (1 cup)
  • Plastic wrap
  • Food coloring

Directions:

  1. Put a golf ball in a small bowl. Cover both the ball and bowl with plastic wrap, making sure the wrap hangs out over the edge. Push the plastic wrap down around the ball.
  2. Mix a third cup baking soda into one cup of warm water and add food coloring. Mix well.
  3. Pour the mixture into the small bowl and over and around the golf ball. Make sure you cover the ball with the baking soda/water mixture. You may need to spoon in some of the baking soda that sits at the bottom of the bowl of warm water.
  4. Place the bowl in a flat place in the freezer. Freeze for at least 4 hrs.
  5. When frozen solid, place the bowl in warm water so the ice comes loose. Place on a tray and lift the volcano out of the bowl. Pry out the golf ball with a spoon and carefully remove the plastic wrap.
  6. Spoon on some vinegar and watch the icy volcano. This project is fun to do outside.
  7. Refreeze your volcano for another day, if there's anything left.

Watch this video at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wo3tfS85M4k&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

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Kids Make: Eric Carle Inspired Painted Collage Mobile

Supplies:

  • Tablecloth
  • Paints (any kind, or water colors could work too)
  • Paintbrushes (any kind)
  • Paint tray
  • Tissue paper or construction paper (three sheets of different colors or just white works too)
  • Cardboard
  • Glue or Mod Podge
  • Yarn or string
  • Scissors
  • Dowel(s) or a coat hanger or a branch with yarn or string tied on.
  • Scissors

Directions:

  1. Cover your workspace with a table cloth or newspaper.
  2. Spread out your tissue paper (or construction paper).
  3. Apply paint to the tissue paper in broad strokes, (no need to cover the entire tissue paper with wet paint.) After the first color is dry, add another color. Let dry again before adding another color. Add designs too, like swirls or zigzags. Let tissue paper dry.
  4. Take cardboard and draw large shapes like a star, crescent moon, square, circle, etc. Cut out the shapes.
  5. When tissue paper is dry, tear into smaller pieces (but not tiny pieces).
  6. Water down some glue or use Mod Podge to cover a cardboard piece, then place a piece of painted tissue paper onto the glued piece of cardboard. Trim any excess tissue paper. Paint glue over the tissue paper too. Repeat with several shapes and allow all pieces to dry.
  7. With a grown-up's help, poke a hole at one end of each cardboard shape. Using different lengths of string or yarn, string up your shapes.
  8. Hang your stringed shapes from your branch or dowel. If you're using two dowels, you can tie them together first by crossing them and tying string or yarn where they intersect.
  9. Adjust your hanging shapes along the dowel so that it's balanced when it hangs. Hang your mobile art up for all to admire.

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tl79U5s4GrA&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

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Kids STEM:Hippopotamus Toothpaste

SUPPLIES AND INGREDIENTS:

  • ½ cup 49 Volume Hydrogen Peroxide (*3% solution, first aid quality, will work … it produces a smaller reaction)
  • 1 TBSP liquid dish soap
  • 1 packet (1 TBSP) Active Dry Yeast
  • 4 TBSP warm water
  • Plastic Cup for mixing yeast and water
  • Food coloring
  • Plastic soda bottle (*16 oz. - 1 liter)
  • Washable or protected work surface
  • Foil Tray with high sides and/or Larger cookie sheet or tray with sides
  • Funnel (optional)
  • *Safety goggles (*or … ski/snow goggles, swim goggles) … for general eye protection!

DIRECTIONS:

To make up a batch of hippopotamus toothpaste …

  1. Place the soda bottle in your tray(s) … on a washable, protected surface.
  2. Pour 150 ml (½ cup) of 40 Volume Hydrogen Peroxide into the soda bottle.
  3. (You might want to use a funnel for this!)

  4. Add 1 tablespoon of liquid dishwashing soap to the bottle.
  5. Pour the packet of yeast into the small cup.
  6. Pour 4 tablespoons of warm water over the yeast.
  7. Carefully swirl the cup around to further mix the yeast and water. *It should be the consistency of melted ice cream. Allow about 30 seconds. Add a bit more warm water, if needed.
  8. Dribble several stripes of food coloring down the inside of the soda bottle. This should produce stripes, just like you might see in real toothpaste.
  9. Pour the yeast solution into the soda bottle … and stand back! Watch the mixture expand and foam up.

*Once the chemical reaction is complete, you should have (mostly) just soapy water and yeast. However, if you used the Volume 40 product, and some of the peroxide was unreached in the experiment, it could irritate skin and eyes. For that reason, it’s
recommended that you don’t play with the foam! And DON’T BRUSH ANY TEETH WITH THIS FOAM!

How It Works …

Each tiny foam bubble in this chemical reaction is filled with oxygen. The yeast is a catalyst, a substance that speeds up a reaction. It quickly broke apart the oxygen from the hydrogen peroxide … and that created lots and lots of bubbles! Your experiment not only created bubbles, but also heat … that makes it an EXOTHERMIC reaction.

Clean Up …

It’s safe to use a sponge to wipe up foam from your table surface, and just wash the remaining liquid and foam from the bottle and tray down the sink drain.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/N91i9ih62ZM?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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Kids Make: Watercolor Stained Glass


Supplies:

  • Watercolors
  • Cup of water
  • Paint brush
  • Pencil
  • Black crayon or oil pastel
  • White watercolor paper or heavy cardstock
  • Black cardstock or construction paper
  • White school glue
  • Glue stick
  • Optional: popsicle stick or toothpicks to spread glue


Directions:

Oil Pastel & Glue Watercolor Stained Glass

  1. Lightly draw a stained-glass design with pencil on your white paper.
  2. Outline the stained-glass design with black pastel or crayon.
  3. Working section by section, wet a section of your design with a paintbrush and plain water. Dab watercolor in that section. Feel free to mix colors.
  4. Repeat for each section of your design, wetting the paper first, before adding paint.
  5. Let your design dry.
  6. Outline each section of your design with glue, inside the black lines.
  7. Spread glue in each section.
  8. Let your project dry.
  9. Finished!

Collage-style Stained Glass

  1. You will need a sheet of black cardstock or construction paper to be the background of your final project.
  2. Lightly draw a stained-glass design with pencil on your white watercolor paper.
  3. Working section by section, wet a section of your design with a paintbrush and plain water. Dab watercolor in that section. Feel free to mix colors.
  4. Repeat for each section of your design, wetting the paper first, before adding paint.
  5. Let your design dry.
  6. Cut out each section of your design.
  7. Lay out your cutout pieces on the black paper.
  8. Once you like the arrangement, glue down each piece to the black paper with a glue stick.
  9. Finished!

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vu2UYBh1G3w&list=PLxg4vmuqrAtckvp9eurSGE...

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Kids STEM: Party Trick-in-a-Can

SUPPLIES:

  • Coffee or Oats Can (empty)
  • Thick Rubber Bands
  • Medium / Large Hex Nut
  • Paper Clips (Large and Small)
  • Nail / Hammer
  • Screwdriver
  • Tape
  • Pencil (*optional)
  • Colored paper, tape, and stickers for decoration (*optional)

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Poke a hole in the center of the coffee / oats can top and bottom using a hammer and nail.
  2. Enlarge the hole by tapping a screwdriver through the hole with a hammer.
  3. Tape your rubber band to the top of the large nut. Make sure it’s centered and very secure! (*Depending on the size of your can, you may need to knot two bands together so that there’s not too much tension on them.)
  4. Open up a small paper clip and thread it through one loop of the rubber band. This will be your “needle.”
  5. From the inside of the can, very carefully “thread” the paper clip (with the rubber band attached) through the hole in the bottom of the can. There may be sharp edges, so be careful! Slip a large paper clip through the rubber band loop to secure it in place. Remove the paper clip “needle.”
  6. Place the paper clip “needle” through the remaining loop of the rubber band and carefully pull it through the hole in the coffee / oats can lid. (If the hex nut has moved closer to one side of the rubber band, move it back so that it hangs on the center of the can when stretched.) (*If necessary, place the pencil between the lid and can to temporarily hold everything in place.)
  7. Slip another large paper clip through the rubber band loop to secure it in place. Remove the paper clip “needle” and the pencil. Make sure the lid is attached securely to the can!
  8. If you’d like, decorate your can with colored paper, tape, and stickers. Time for testing! On a flat, smooth surface, gently roll your can away from you. Just before it mysteriously begins to roll back, summon your super powers and call the can back to you. A little “hocus pocus” or “abracadabra” will convince your audience of the magic.

*Troubleshooting : Be sure to use thick rubber bands that will store up enough energy to cause the can to roll back to you. Also check that your hex nut is not touching the side of the can. If it is, use a shorter rubber band or knot your rubber band. If just one band is too short and tight, knot two rubber bands together. You can also thread an extra hex nut onto the outside top and bottom of the can as spacers if your rubber band(s) are too long. Experiment and you’ll get it just right.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/Hk1OthEqSfs

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Kids Make: Box Craft

Supplies:

  • Boxes
  • Paper
  • Any random materials – bottle caps, beads, egg cartons, cds, etc.
  • Scissors
  • Adhesive – glue, stickers, etc.

Directions:

Use these found, recycled items to make your own creation.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/Zc1PUl5WCSw

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Kids STEM: Rubber Band Paddle Boats

Supplies:

  • One plastic bottle along with its lid, about the size of a disposable water bottle (it can be a drink bottle, shampoo bottle, catsup bottle, mustard bottle, or any other clean, plastic bottle.) You can experiment with bottles of different shapes and sizes!
  • Two chopsticks, new pencils, sturdy skewers, or any other straight sticks of equal size; they must be long enough to fit at least halfway along the edge of your bottle and then hang off the end by 4 to 5 inches.
  • Thick foam board OR plastic carton(like a whipped cream tub or kitchen wipes container) OR two disposable plastic spoons
  • Rubber bands of different sizes
  • Duct tape or packing tape
  • Scissors
  • Paper
  • Ruler
  • Permanent marker

Directions:

  1. Line up your two sticks on opposite sides and along the length of your clean bottle; tape into place using the duct tape or packing tape (or use rubber bands if you have no tape.)
  2. Slide a rubber band over the ends of the sticks. Your rubber band should be taut without falling off but not so tight that it bends your sticks inward. If your rubber band is too big, try doubling it. It helps to loop the rubber band around each stick so it doesn’t fall off.
  3. Trace and cut a 2 inch X 3 inch template from the paper. Then use the paper template to trace 4 rectangles on the sides, bottom, or lid of a plastic container and cut them out.* The plastic should be soft enough to bend. Bend each piece in half; then use narrow pieces of duct tape to hold the pieces together with the curves flaring in opposite directions and all the bends in the middle.
  4. Slide your curved, taped plastic carton pieces or your taped spoons or your joined foam pieces between the sides of the rubber band. This is your paddle! At this point, you can tape the paddle to the rubber band.
  5. Try it out! You can sail your paddle boat in the bathtub, in a pond or quiet stream, or in a swimming or kiddie pool. Wind the paddle within the rubber band. Do it several times, but don’t wind it so much that it snaps. With the paddle still wound, set your boat gently in the water and let it go!

(Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/aFYJ9Aga7VY?list=PLxg4vmuqrAte4QgWzVQ7oInsSnnMkwcil)

* Caution: Some plastics become sharp when cut. Get an adult’s help if you need it!
Alternate method: Using a wire cutter or strong scissors, trim the handles of two plastic spoons so that they are 2 ½ inches long; use a narrow piece of duct tape to hold the spoons together along the short handle with one spoon facing up and one spoon facing down.
Second alternate method: Cut two 3 inch squares out of thick foam board and cut a slit just to the middle of each so that they can slide together.

The Science behind this Project:

The wound rubber band stores energy. The more you wind it the more energy is stored. The term for stored energy is “potential energy.” When you release the rubber band, the “potential energy” is converted into “kinetic energy,” or the energy of motion.

More experimentation:

Does the boat go faster or slower if the paddle is moved closer to the boat?
Does the boat go backwards if the paddle is wound in the other direction?
Does a big boat go faster or slower than a small boat?
When your boat is in the water, can you spot other forms of kinetic energy caused by the boat’s motion?
Can you think of other examples of potential and kinetic energy?

More ideas:

Make a balloon powered car
Make a rubber band helicopter

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Kids Make: Paper Sculptures that Pop!

Supplies:

  • 8 ½ x11” sheets of colored cardstock or heavyweight construction paper
  • Scissors
  • Colored dot stickers or other small stickers- optional
  • Scraps of colorful/decorative papers- optional
  • Hole punch
  • Glue stick

Directions:

  1. Fold an 8 ½ x 11” sheet of cardstock or heavy construction paper in half OR cut the sheet to a smaller size, then fold in half, making a strong crease on the fold line.
  2. Holding onto the folded side of your paper with one hand, give the top of your paper a decorative trim. Still holding the folded side with one hand, begin cutting 1” in from the open side, starting at the bottom of your paper. Let the outside edge guide your cutting line. STOP when you are about 1” from the top of your paper. Turn the corner with your scissors and cut across the paper, toward the fold. STOP about ¼” from the fold!
  3. Repeat the cutting from the bottom of your paper, always moving over about 1” from your previous cut before beginning. You can make your vertical and horizontal cuts straight or decorative. Making lines and curves, play around with each sculpture you create, giving your pieces some variety!
  4. When you have made 3-4 cutting lines, depending on the size of your paper, open up your paper and lay it on a flat surface. You can decorate your paper, front and back, using stickers or scraps of paper.
  5. Turn your paper into a 3-D sculpture with a few folds: Beginning on one side of your sculpture, fold the top “leg” TOWARD the center, creasing a new fold at the end of your scissor cut (where you stopped about ¼” from the main fold line). The next “leg” should be folded BACKWARD in the same manner. Continue, folding each leg ... front, back ... in this alternating pattern. Do the same thing on the other side, BUT the top “leg” will be folded backward. Continue the folding pattern ... front, back, front.
  6. Display your 3-D sculpture by working with the “legs” and folds to make it stand. Make a few more, varying the size of your paper, cutting lines, and decorations to grow your piece into an artistic stabile (a freestanding abstract sculpture) that POPS!

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPxBwVPqYR4&list=PLxg4vmuqrAtckvp9eurSGE...

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Kids Stem: Paper Airplane Challenge

In this project, you make two different paper airplane designs and then test out each one to determine which one will fly the furthest.

Supplies:



  • Two pieces of paper for airplanes
  • Markers or crayons to decorate
  • Pencil and paper to record your results

Directions:

Plane Design #1- Classic Glider

  1. Fold your paper hot dog style.
  2. Lay the paper out in front of you, portrait style.
  3. Fold the top-right corner to the center crease, lining up the edges and creating a triangle.
  4. Do the same thing with the left corner.
  5. Fold the right side again, along the crease.
  6. Do the same thing with the left side.
  7. Fold the plane inwards, in half, so the previous folds are on the inside.
  8. Fold back one side so the edges align.
  9. Flip and repeat with the other wing.

Plane Design #2- Speed Glider

  1. Fold your paper hot dog style.
  2. Lay the paper out in front of you, portrait style.
  3. Fold the top-right corner to the center crease, lining up the edges and creating a triangle.
  4. Do the same thing with the left corner.
  5. Fold the point of the plane down, creating a fold along the bottom of the corner triangles. The tip should be about ⅓ of the page from the bottom of the paper.
  6. Fold the top-right corner to the center, about one inch above the tip.
  7. Repeat with the left corner. This should create a small triangle at the point.
  8. Fold the small triangle up.
  9. Flip your plane over so that your folds are on the table.
  10. Fold your plane in half, left side onto its right, so the edges line up.
  11. Fold the top wing down so your edges align.
  12. Flip and repeat with the other wing. Once you have completed your planes. Test them out in an open space, like your backyard or the park. Make a chart and compare each of your planes and how far it flew each time.

Watch these airplane projects at: https://youtu.be/QdronFgR0Yc?list=PLxg4vmuqrAte4QgWzVQ7oInsSnnMkwcil

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Kids Make: Pony Bead Animal Keychains

Supplies:

  • Pattern or picture of design
  • 4ft of craft lace
  • Key Ring
  • Scissors
  • Pony beads
    • 35 green
    • 15 blue
    • 6 yellow
    • 4 orange
    • 2 black

Directions:

  1. Tie your craft lace to your key ring, leaving two legs of equal length.
  2. Look at the top line of your pattern, and find pony beads to match that line. If you’re using the bird pattern, the first line will be 3 green beads.
  3. String those beads onto one of the legs of craft lace, in the order you see them on the pattern. (This may not matter for the first line, but it’s important later on!) Push the beads up to the top of the craft lace, next to the key ring.
  4. Now, string the other leg of craft lace through beads in the opposite direction of the first leg. Pull the craft lace all the way through. Reposition the line of beads so that they form the bottom side of a craft lace triangle, with the keyring as the triangle’s top corner. When you’re done, you should have to two equal lengths of craft lace again, one on either side of the line of beads.
  5. Repeat steps 2-4 with every line of your pattern.
  6. When you’re done, tie a knot in the craft lace at the bottom of your design, and trim any excess length. Good job!

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/T6w5u62hrp0?list=PLxg4vmuqrAtckvp9eurSGEI2DwSb1wI6o

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Kids Stem: The Ripple Effect of Kindness

Supplies:

  • A container filled with water
  • Various objects of different sizes and weights - examples: beads, rocks, pennies, small plastic toys

Directions:

  1. Drop in objects and observe the effect on the water
  2. Discuss what you see. Do you notice a ripple? Does it make a splash? What happens if you drop in lots of objects at once?
  3. Discuss how our behavior and actions also have an effect on the world around us.
  4. Make a list of acts of kindness you can do.
  5. Spread the ripple effect of kindness!

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHM_X3wcmfQ&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

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Kids Make: DIY Kites

Supplies:

  • Paper
  • Scissors
  • Glue stick
  • Hole punch
  • String
  • Stapler
  • Markers
  • Streamers (optional)

Directions:

  1. Fold a piece of paper in half hamburger style.
  2. Use a marker to mark one quarter of the way in on the creased edge.
  3. Take the top left corner of the top half of the paper and bend it to meet the mark you just made.
  4. Do the same with the opposite corner to create the "wings" of your kite. Take care not to fold the paper flat, you want the paper to form a funnel for the air to move through when you are pulling your kite.
  5. Staple the corners in place. You now have the body of your kite.
  6. Use a hole punch to create a hole behind the staple.
  7. Decorate! Use cut paper and markers to turn your kite into an animal, add streamers or long strips of paper to the back.
  8. Tie a string into the hole punch.
  9. You're ready to fly!

Watch this project at:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIivPH2CcOc

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Kids Stem: Cabbage Juice Chemistry

Supplies:

  • 2-3 purple cabbage leaves
  • 4 cups water
  • Blender
  • Strainer
  • Bowl
  • Paper towel
  • Several clear containers or cups
  • Vinegar
  • Baking soda
  • Optional: liquid dishwasher detergent, fruit juice, clear soda or carbonated water, soap, salt, other kitchen substances (with grownup approval)

Directions:

  1. Tear 2 to 3 leaves off the head of a purple cabbage, tear leaves into smaller pieces.
  2. Put cabbage leaves into a blender with about 4 cups of water and with a grownup's help, blend on high until the liquid is very purple with a few chunks remaining.
  3. Strain cabbage juice into mesh strainer lined with paper towel, over a large bowl.
  4. Pour the cabbage juice into a container or pitcher. This purple cabbage juice is now your pH indicator.
    Purple cabbage juice contains a compound called anthocyanin. Anthocyanin will turn pink when mixed with acid, blue-green when mixed with a base, and purple when mixed with a neutral substance, such as water.
  5. Take 3-4 additional clear containers: add a spoonful of baking soda to one cup; add a few spoonfuls of vinegar to a second cup; add a bit of water to a third cup.
  6. Ask your grownup if you can use a small amount of dishwasher detergent into an additional cup.
  7. Now, you'll add some cabbage juice to each of the four cups you've prepared, even the one that's just water. When the purple cabbage juice is mixed with vinegar, what happens? (You should see the mixture turn pink.) Why? Vinegar is an acid. Pour cabbage juice into the container with baking soda, then also the cup with the dishwasher soap. What is happening to these two solutions? (Baking soda is a base, so it will turn bluish-purple. The dishwasher soap mixture should turn a vivid blue-green because dishwasher soap is very basic, or alkaline.) What happened when you added cabbage juice to just water?
  8. Line your four cups up on the counter. You will use these color results to compare other substances you want to test to see if they are acids or bases.
  9. Pink indicates an acid. Place this cup to the left. Purple (water) is neutral. Place this one in the middle. Blue-green is basic. Place this cup to the right of the purple cup. If you used dishwasher detergent, place this cup to the very far right. It’s one of the most alkaline substances you will find in a kitchen.
  10. Now, try adding purple cabbage juice to other substances you want to test.
  11. Compare the colors of your test mixtures and place them between the cups, where you think they should go. Soon, you will have a spectrum of acids and bases and you can compare the acidity of two substances, such as vinegar vs. orange juice.

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nB1UzYZf4s&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

Comments: 0
Kids Make: Crunchy Baked Cotton Balls

Supplies:

  • Cotton balls
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup water
  • Large mixing bowl
  • Food coloring
  • Baking sheet
  • Small bowls or cups
  • Either cooking spray or tin foil
  • An adult to help with the oven

Directions:

  1. Mix 1 cup of flour with 1 cup of water in the large bowl.
  2. Get your baking sheet ready by spraying it with baking spray or covering it with tin foil.
  3. Divide the flour and water mixture into 4 to 6 small bowls or cups, depending on how many colors you want.
  4. Add 5 to 8 drops of food coloring to each cup and mix well. Remember that you can make different colors by mixing the food coloring; red and yellow make orange and blue and red make purple.
  5. Dip each cotton ball into a cup. Be sure to cover the whole cotton ball with the mixture – make it nice and thick.
  6. Set the coated cotton balls on your baking sheet.
  7. Let an adult help you with this part. Bake your cotton balls in a 300 degree oven for about 45 minutes.
  8. After that, take the cotton balls out and let them cool completely – at least an hour. They should have a nice, hard, crunchy shell.
  9. Find a small hammer, a toy hammer, or even a rock. Take your cotton balls outside and - SMASH THEM WITH THE HAMMER! That’s right – smash away.

Extra fun:

Use more cotton balls to make a baked sculpture. Use the same dipping method, but keep the sculpture in the over a little longer – about 55 minutes. You can make and smash a crunchy monster!

To watch this project visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mvw4q6cr6xY&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5S...

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