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KidsMAKE: Craft Stick Scrolls

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD Libraries beginning this Friday, Nov. 20, 2020.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/XkX6xyy3Ai8?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFenhH3jVzKk-QmaHXdAFOBq

Supplies:

  • Construction paper (in kit)
  • Craft sticks (in kit)
  • Ribbon (in kit)
  • Scissors
  • Markers
  • Decorations

Directions:

  1. Decorate craft sticks with markers, glitter - anything!
  2. Cut the paper long, but slightly less wide than the craft sticks.
  3. Write a letter, secret note, or create art on one side of your paper.
  4. Glue a craft stick to the top and a craft stick to the bottom of the same side as your art. Let the glue dry.
  5. Roll the bottom craft stick up to the top like a scroll.
  6. Tie a ribbon around your scroll!

craft stick scroll

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Our Response to COVID-19

Last updated Jan. 19, 2021

Libraries Welcome You Back Inside

Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) is here to serve you, regardless of the circumstances!

We continue to prioritize the health and safety of our patrons, staff, and greater community during this ongoing global pandemic. With El Paso County moving back to the “orange” status, PPLD now welcomes people back inside all of our libraries; no reservation needed. The Library will continue to follow public health orders and guidance, but now our resources and services can be more accessible again.

You can visit the Library to browse the collection and check out items, use a computer, or utilize copying, faxing, and scanning services, all without a reservation. Although not required, you are able to reserve a computer session by calling (719) 389-8968.

Open hours and specific services may vary by library location, so please check in advance. The first hour will be reserved for people at higher risk of serious complications from COVID-19.

In addition to services offered inside our libraries, we also offer:

  • Curbside services allow you to easily pick up Library materials, wireless print jobs, and take and make kits without having to go inside any location. You also can use our 24/7 book drops to return Library materials at any time.
  • Have a question? Ask a librarian! You can connect with PPLD staff by phone, live chat, or email. Or, book an appointment with one of our specialized librarians.
  • Take advantage of our large digital collection, extensive hub of online resources, and many virtual programs available for all ages and interests. Browse our online Catalog, conduct research, or participate in a Library event from almost anywhere, anytime. Get started using our Library remotely!
  • Need WiFi? It should be accessible outside most library facilities for anyone to use, day or night.

What can I expect when visiting the Library inside?

During your Library visit, you can do the following:

  • Browse the physical collection.
  • Use self-checkout machines and service desks.
  • Reserve one, 55-minute computer session per day. Reservations encouraged! Call (719) 389-8968 to book your session; Library card required to reserve by phone.
  • Use machines to fax, scan, and/or copy documents without staff assistance.
  • Charge your devices.
  • Make a 55-minute reservation to access Special Collections in the 1905 Carnegie Library.

Here’s what to expect during your Library visit to help prevent the spread of COVID-19:

  • Cloth face coverings or masks are required by all patrons and staff to enter all libraries. (If you do not have one, PPLD can provide you with a single-use mask at no cost. Some exemptions do apply, such as for those under the age of 2, which aligns with guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.)
  • Capacity limits are enforced inside each location, and when capacity is reached, patrons will need to wait outside until others are ready to leave following their brief visits.
  • The number of patrons inside are monitored at all times.
  • Staff are regularly sanitizing frequently touched items like handles, counters, and copiers. Computers are cleaned between each use.
  • If you retrieve a book from a shelf but decide you don’t want it, please place it on the designated cart instead of re-shelving it yourself.
  • All fax machines, copiers, and computers are self-service only; staff can only offer assistance at services desks, behind a protective shield.
  • Some computers will not be available as we encourage patrons and staff to remain six feet apart in our computer labs.
  • Other areas and items that remain temporarily unavailable or closed to the public: Furniture, water fountains, children’s play area, meeting and study rooms, studios, and makerspaces.

Please remember that open hours and specific services may vary by Library location, so please check in advance. The first hour will be reserved for people at higher risk of serious complications from COVID-19.

We ask that you keep your visits as brief as possible in order to minimize risk for everyone inside our Libraries.


Why is the Library requiring patrons to wear face masks?

PPLD prioritizes the health and safety of Library patrons, staff, and the community-at-large. To provide library services and resources inside of our facilities, our staff must interact directly with patrons in close proximity. We have instituted this requirement, along with other precautionary measures, to minimize potential transmission of COVID-19.

This is in accordance with Governor Polis’ Executive Order to slow the spread of COVID-19 in Colorado communities. Effective July 16, everyone in Colorado over the age of 10 is required to wear a face covering inside any public space. Also, after significant discussion and consideration of scientific findings during the May 27 public meeting, PPLD’s Board of Trustees unanimously approved the requirement of cloth face coverings by patrons and staff inside all libraries to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 in El Paso County and beyond. The Board of Trustees determined that the Library District will comply with CDC recommendations requiring masks for those ages two and older, rather than the statewide recommendation of 10 and older.

PPLD will continue to adhere to public health guidance that’s grounded in science, especially as El Paso County Public Health and the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment track COVID-19 cases within El Paso County and across the state.

If you do not feel comfortable wearing a mask, PPLD still offers curbside services at all libraries. There are also many ways to use the Library remotely, almost anytime and anywhere.


What else can I expect from PPLD?

Here’s an overview of what is available – and not available – to our Library cardholders and patrons at this time:

  • Want to return items and pick-up holds? Our curbside services are still available at all libraries! Use the link to find out more and access your library’s service hours and pickup instructions.
  • There are so many ways to use the Library remotely! Browse our Online Catalog. Stream and download books, audiobooks, comics, magazines, music, and videos. Use our databases to conduct research, access ample resources for kids and teens, and more from your couch.
  • Check out our virtual programs! Our librarians are bringing their services to you, anywhere and anytime.
  • Have a question? Ask a librarian! Our staff are available to help you by phone, live chat, and email. You also can book an appointment with a specialized librarian.
  • Checked out items: Please check your PPLD accounts either through our Catalog or on the PPLD mobile app for the new return dates, which will be listed by item. (Returns are accepted outside of all libraries as part of curbside service.)
  • Fines & fees: We officially went fine-free for most Library materials in early 2019, as long as they are not lost or damaged. (See above regarding checked out items.)
  • OverDrive: Since more patrons are using PPLD digital resources online, cardholders can have 20 checkouts for a total of 14 days each; the holds limit remains at a total of 30. PPLD will continue to add copies of digital materials to our collection as our budget allows. Some digital checkouts can be returned early so others have opportunity for access. Instructions for checking out and returning are available here.
  • Library programs & reservations: All in-person Library programs and events held inside of PPLD facilities, along with public meeting and study room reservations, have been cancelled through Sun., Jan. 31, unless it is deemed safe to resume sooner. Do note that this could be extended depending upon the state orders and local public health guidelines as we approach the end of 2020.
  • Library card signup: Register online and start using your card immediately! If you sign up online during this time, your temporary account will be available for 90 days (instead of the usual 12-day limit), giving you immediate access to OverDrive and other digital resources from home. Bring your ID and proof of address to your nearest Library and they can activate your full privilege account curbside!
  • Account expirations & renewals: Library card/account expirations will be extended, including accounts that expired in the past 24 months.
  • Interlibrary loans: Due to staffing restrictions based on guidance from local public health officials, maintaining the current number of requests is not feasible. Therefore, we are decreasing the number of Interlibrary Loans requests to three per library card. We expect requests to take longer to fulfill (borrowing or purchasing), with a potential wait time of four to eight weeks.
  • WiFi access: All Library facilities continue to provide open WiFi access, which should be also available outside of most PPLD buildings.
  • Friends of PPLD and book donations: PPLD Friends Bookstores have reopened.
    Online sales continue with curbside pickup at East Library. Shop our collection now!
    Have donations for us? Complete the form here to request an appointment to donate your materials.

What’s happening behind the scenes at the Library?

All returned materials may be quarantined for up to four days before being processed and circulated. This time limit has been approved by El Paso County Public Health.

Per the current COVID-19 status, the Library team can only work at half capacity inside our facilities. On-site staff are required to follow public health guidance like wearing face coverings, washing hands thoroughly and frequently, and maintaining proper distance during any in-person interactions. They are shelving books, pulling holds, quarantining returned materials, and helping circulate thousands of books, movies, and other items from PPLD’s large collection between our libraries.

In addition to our limited services inside, our librarians are still here for you virtually! Staff continue to take your questions by phone, live chat, and email. They’re also providing and expanding virtual services and programs, along with our digital collection. And, we’re working with community organizations, school districts, and other partners to support El Paso County residents with many different needs during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.


Information About COVID-19

Have questions about the novel coronavirus?
We understand that people may be concerned about COVID-19 and how it may affect them. Please check out the following public resources for more information:

What should I do?
To help stop the spread of germs and any contagious illness, local and national public health experts recommend that everyone should take everyday preventive actions and practice good hygiene. Here are some tips specific to the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • Put distance between yourself and other people; at least 6 feet apart.

  • Stay home if you’re sick.

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover whenever in public settings, such as grocery stores, pharmacies, medical facilities, hiking trails, etc.

  • Frequently and thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer, if you cannot wash your hands.

  • Keep your hands away from your eyes, nose, and mouth; avoid touching with unwashed hands.

  • Cover your mouth with tissue when coughing or sneezing, and then properly wash your hands.

  • Clean surfaces and personal items, such as cell phones, using household disinfecting products.

What is COVID-19?
There is a global pandemic situation involving a respiratory illness named COVID-19, which is caused by a new coronavirus that spreads through coughing or sneezing, much like influenza (also known as the flu). Vaccines have been approved and are being distributed.
For current information and updates on the pandemic:

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Buying Books as Gifts this Holiday Season?

Check out the pdf link to see what young children like in books. Brought to you by the Colorado State Library.

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In these unprecedented times, Pikes Peak Library District is a constant. This year, the need for PPLD’s resources has been greater than ever.

A couple months ago, I was visiting the Old Colorado City Library and met a man named Charlie. The building was still closed to the public at that time due to COVID-19 public health restrictions, but curbside service was available and Charlie was waiting to collect items he had checked out. We got to talking and Charlie told me he was there to check out a WIFI hotspot. Like so many others, Charlie lost his job during the pandemic and without internet he couldn’t apply for jobs. “I don’t have internet at home and everything is online these days. I don’t know what I’d do if I couldn’t get internet through the library.”

As the second largest library system in Colorado, PPLD operates 16 facilities and serves a population of more than 660,000 residents in El Paso County. In 2019, patrons made 3.1 million visits to the library and checked out nearly 8.3 million items. There were more than one million uses of our paid and locally developed databases. We received 50,000+ online meeting room requests and 250,000 people attended a library program.

Mobile Libraries during COVID-19When COVID-19 hit El Paso County in March of this year the impact library closures had on our community was felt immediately. Hundreds of thousands of people who rely on the library for critical resources and services suddenly found PPLD’s doors closed. During the course of weeks and months following the library’s initial closure, PPLD quickly adapted to a new reality, and the accomplishments we have realized while successfully pivoting around a “new normal” have become a model for libraries throughout the country.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, PPLD expanded its remote and virtual offerings in a myriad of ways. Our librarians are bringing their services to you, anywhere and anytime. Library patrons can watch a virtual story time with their kids, participate in a virtual book club, or join us for a community movie discussion. Patrons can ask one of our reference librarians questions by phone, live chat, and email. For parents who have suddenly found themselves teachers, we have ample resources for children and teenagers, including homework help, reading help, planning for the future, and more. Patrons can stream and download eBooks, music, and videos from almost anywhere!

All 15 Libraries and three mobile Libraries continue to offer curbside service, making it easy for you to return materials and safely pick up items without having any direct contact with Library staff or other patrons. And, on July 1, Library facilities have re-opened to the public in accordance with public health and safety guidelines.

PPLD participated in several initiatives to address unique community challenges brought about by this pandemic. We have been a part of the statewide Make4Covid movement and worked with makers throughout our region to help in the production of personal protective equipment for the medical community, first responders, and those who need it most. PPLD staff installed public water stations at Penrose Library so any and all can fill containers whenever needed. Staff members also boxed up thousands of books and handed them out at free lunch distribution sites throughout Colorado Springs. So, when people came for a meal, they got a book, too.

PPLD Makerspaces during COVID-19For nearly 60 years, Pikes Peak Library District has stood as a pillar of the community, and we will continue to serve the community in every way we can during this pandemic and beyond. But, none of this is possible without the public’s investment and donors like you. PPLD has felt the economic impacts of the pandemic, and we are now facing a budget shortfall of at least $500,000. Will you support PPLD, and people like Charlie, by donating today? Your charitable gift of $30, $50, $100 or $1,000* will help PPLD be stronger and more prepared to accommodate the changing times and the growing need for our many critical services.

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Take and Make STEM: Science of Flight

This Science of Flight Take and Make STEM project will be available at area PPLD Libraries starting Nov. 13, 2020 and is intended for ages 5-12.

Watch these projects at: https://youtu.be/6W6ZtLCe1ow?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

Materials provided in Take and Make:

Materials you provide:

  • Tape
  • Hole punch (or something else to poke a hole)
  • Scissors

The Science of Flight

Four forces of flight not only affect how an airplane flies, but also affect a paper airplane. These forces – lift, thrust, drag, and weight – determine how a plane will fly.

  • Lift is the force that keeps the plane in the air. Lift works opposite the weight of the plane.
  • Thrust is the force that propels the plane forward.
  • Drag acts opposite to the direction of motion. This force is affected by friction and differences in air pressure.
  • Weight is the force of gravity. The pull of an object toward the center of the earth.

In today’s Science of Flight activity, we’ll do several activities. Since paper airplanes are subject to the same forces as actual airplanes, think about the forces of flight and experiment to see what helps your plane fly straighter, more accurately, or farther.

Paper Airplanes:

Use the paper to create paper airplanes. See the pdf link below for the template. Which ones fly the farthest? Which has the best aim? How can you adapt them to change their flight? Test them out.

Paper Airplane catapult:

Start by using the template to create a paper airplane. Just fold on the numbers in order, always folding to the inside so you cover the number with the fold. Once your airplane is folded, punch or poke a hole through all layers about 2 inches from the nose of the plane. Push a rubber band through your hole and then put one end of the rubber band through the other and pull gently. Fly the airplane by hooking the rubber band to your thumb or finger, gently pulling back on the airplane, and then letting go of the plane. See how far it will go! Can you aim it?

Whirly-gig:

Take the whirly-gig in your Take and Make or go to the NASA link above to print out a Mars Helicopter template. On the end where the paper is divided in half, fold the halves in opposite directions. On the part that’s divided into thirds, fold the 2 outside parts in on the dotted lines and then fold the bottom up twice. Either toss the Whirly-gig straight up or drop it from a high place and watch it float down. Experiment with it.

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July 31, 2021 marks the 150-year anniversary of the founding of Colorado Springs by William Jackson Palmer. The city, founded at the base of Pikes Peak, experienced many changes over the last 150 years as it has grown to the 39th largest city in the United States.

Sesquicentennial - noun
ses·​qui·​cen·​ten·​ni·​al | \ ˌse-skwi-sen-ˈte-nē-əl \
A 150th anniversary or its celebration.

Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) and other community organizations are planning an extensive series of programming and events throughout the year. Many programs focus on providing a historic background to better understand our city today, both for people new to the community and for folks just starting to learn about the region’s history. Other programs are designed to critically examine and appraise the complexities of Colorado Springs’ past. The history of our city is important to all of us; there is something for everyone.



Check back for more programs and events as they are added.


CoS History Book Club

The past is the window to the present. Using the published works of local historians as inspiration, this program will highlight specific themes of Colorado Springs and the region. It is offered in concert with the books referenced, which provide additional background. However, attendees should not feel obligated to read the books in advance of the discussion. The series will provide high-quality information about the community to a broad and diverse audience.

Inspired by the Pikes Peak Library Districts’ Regional History Book Series book, Extraordinary Women of the Pikes Peak Region, the first program will introduce women important to Colorado Springs history.

Chris Nicholl, PPLD Regional History and Genealogy staff member, will share the story of three Colorado Springs women whose political demonstrations at the gates of the White House landed them in prison and helped win the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, granting American women the right to vote. Susan Fletcher, Glen Eyrie Navigators Historian and Archivist, will explore the lives of Queen Palmer, wife of General William Jackson Palmer, and their three daughters, Elsie, Dorothy, and Marjory.

For more information about women of the Pikes Peak Region, Extraordinary Women of the Pikes Peak Region highlights these stories as well as the stories of 18 other women. The book can be checked out physically at the Library, downloaded from our online Catalog, or listened to on the Libby app.

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Artists of the Knight

Check out a new virtual program from Knight of Columbus Hall (KCH) featuring artists from around the Pikes Peak region. Season One has premiered but you can still watch and support local artists!

Watch here:

Be sure to follow us on Facebook for updates and more!


Interested in being featured on Artists of the Knight? Click here!


Previous Artists:

Click here to learn more about KCH.


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Tween Twist: Election Day Bottle Cap and Fridge Magnets

Take and Makes for these projects will be available at area PPLD Libraries starting this Friday, Nov. 6, 2020.

Supplies provided:

  • Bottle cap
  • “I Voted” sticker
  • Blank sticker
  • Epoxy sticker
  • Circle or square magnet
  • Blank business card
  • Rectangular magnet

Supplies needed (from home):

  • Markers or colored pencils

Watch the “how to” video on PPLD TV: https://youtu.be/GPgX1oKgfNE?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

Bottle Cap Magnets:

  1. Choose if you want to use the “I Voted” sticker or design your own. If you would like to design your own sticker, do so on the blank white sticker (not the clear, thick sticker).
  2. Peel off one sticker and stick to the inside of the bottle cap.
  3. Peel off the epoxy sticker (the clear, thick sticker) and place on top of the first sticker inside of the bottle cap. Press down to make sure it is stuck tight.(Avoid touching the back of the sticker as it will leave fingerprints.)
  4. Peel the adhesive backing off the small round or square magnet. Stick the magnet to the back of the bottle cap.

Fridge Magnets

  1. Decorate the blank business card. You can design it however you want. Some ideas include drawing a mini poster for your favorite fictional character or writing out words on the business card to make magnetic poetry.
  2. If you decide to make magnetic poetry, start by drawing 4 light pencil lines on your business card. Then write out election day themed words with colored markers. Be sure to include some articles (a,an,the), some descriptive words, overreactions, and some nouns (like people, animals, places, or things). Your imagination is the limit! (Only decorate one side of the business card).
  3. Peel off the back of the rectangular magnet and stick it to the back of the decorated business card. You now have a fridge magnet! If you decided to create magnetic poetry, use a pair of scissors to cut out each individual word,then arrange them into funny or meaningful poetry phrases.

Want to share your creations? Tag us on Facebook @ppldteens or @ppldkids.

magnet 1magnet 2magnet 3

magnet 4magnet 5

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Library reaches record-breaking milestone with two million digital books checkouts!

Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) reached a record-breaking milestone this week, with two million digital book checkouts. This accomplishment illustrates the continued growth and importance of library digital lending of eBooks and eAudiobooks, especially in a year with building closures due to the global pandemic. PPLD is one of only 40 OverDrive digital collections worldwide to hit the two-million mark at this point in 2020.

PPLD has been providing cardholders with 24/7 access to eBooks and eAudiobooks for several years through OverDrive and its award-winning Libby reading app. Reader interest and usage has grown every year, with about a 42% increase since 2016. In the wake of COVID-19, PPLD took extra steps to make the collection as accessible as possible like extending the length of online library card signups and reinstating expired cards from the 24 months prior to March 2020.

The milestone checkout was Cold as Ice: Lucy Kincaid Series, Book 17 by Allison Brennan and Ann Marie Lee on the evening of Oct. 27, 2020. At this point in 2020, PPLD’s highest-circulating digital title has been Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens, checked out as an eBook or eAudiobook over 6,000 times. The top-circulating genres through OverDrive include fiction with more than one million circulations, nonfiction at nearly 460,000 checkouts, and romance at nearly 415,000 circulations.

Here are the top five titles borrowed through PPLD’s digital collection as of Oct. 29, 2020:

Top eBook Titles in 2020:
Top eAudiobook Titles in 2020:

Residents in El Paso County only need a valid library card to access digital books from PPLD’s OverDrive-powered digital collection. Readers can use any major device, including Apple(R), Android™, Chromebook™ and Kindle(R) (US only).

Check out our eLibrary or download the Libby app to start borrowing eBooks and eAudiobooks anytime, anywhere!

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Homeschool Creepy Science

Note: See pdf file below to print and see pictures of activities.Watch these projects at: https://youtu.be/HXYILnF5914?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

I. MAGIC PUMPKIN

Supplies:

  • Large bag of Reese’s Pieces
  • Measuring cup with hot tap water (works best with freshly boiled water due to Colorado’s high altitude; an adult can place in a measuring cup and pour)
  • White plate or platter
  • Toothpicks or small straws

Directions:

  1. Arrange your Reese’s Pieces in the shape of a pumpkin. We placed the orange candies in a circle to form the sides and used four brown candies to make the stem at the top. You can add a brown mouth and maybe even yellow for the eyes if you like. Do you like theway it looks?
  2. What do you predict will happen once we add the water? In science, we call your guess a hypothesis. Tell each other your guesses or write them down. You can even draw what your pumpkin looks like now and what you think it will look like after we add the warm water. This is called the Scientific Method (see below for more information on the Scientific Method).
  3. Very slowly add some hot water, pouring along the outside edge of the pumpkin. Add only enough water to cover the plate (adult help may be required).
  4. The magic pumpkin will slowly appear! Enjoy a couple nibbles of candy and watch what the water does. You can use your toothpicks or straws to swirl the colors. It’s magical!

Project adapted from: https://www.playdoughtoplato.com/magic-pumpkin-science/

II. CREEPY SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS WITH DRY ICE

SAFETY NOTE: Dry ice can be purchased at the Customer Service counter in the grocery store. Keep it in the heavy plastic bag it comes in! The ice should be purchased the same day you plan to use it; it will gradually sublimate, returning to its gaseous state, if it sits unused for too long. Don’t plan to store the dry ice in your freezer! It is so cold that it will trick your freezer into thinking that it needs to shut off!
Do plan to store it in a Styrofoam chest … unless you are going to use it as soon as you get it
home. An adult should oversee these projects for safety.
.

Screaming Dry Ice

Supplies:

  • Dry ice
  • Heavy work gloves
  • Stainless-steel tongs

Directions:

  1. Using a pair of heavy work gloves (leather is best), hold a piece of dry ice in one hand, and a pair of stainless-steel kitchen tongs in the other. Use the tongs to securely grab hold of the chunk of dry ice.
  2. As the room temperature tongs bring heat to the surface of the extremely cold dry ice, the ice will begin to sublimate (kind of like “melting” from a solid back to a gas). The process causes the tongs to slightly vibrate, producing a high-pitched scream! So be prepared!
  3. Set your dry ice aside for another experiment.

Spooky Bubbling Tower

Supplies:

  • Dry ice
  • Heavy work gloves
  • Hammer
  • Tall glass container
  • Tray or cookie sheet with low sides
  • Very warm water
  • Food coloring
  • Dawn dish soap

Directions:

  1. With a gloved hand, place your plastic bag of dry ice on a surface that will allow you to hammer the ice into some smaller chunks (not too tiny) … like a sidewalk or driveway. Leave all the pieces in the bag and return them to the Styrofoam chest until you need them.
  2. Place the glass container on a tray or cookie sheet. Fill the container with 2-3” of very warm water.
  3. With your gloved hand, pick up a couple of ice chunks and place them in the container. The water will bubble as the ice begins to sublimate, and carbon dioxide gas will be released from the ice in the form of a misty “smoke,” or “fog.” Put your hands in the
    “fog” and blow it around a bit!
  4. While the water is rapidly bubbling (you may need to add 2-3 more chunks of ice … don’t forget the leather glove), add a couple drops of food coloring for a spooky potion.
  5. Next, drizzle in some Dawn dish soap. This will produce a bubbling tower! The movement of the water, caused by the sublimating ice, will cause soap bubbles to form, bubbles that are filled with carbon dioxide. Go ahead … POP a handful of bubbles. Then watch to find out how long it takes for the ice to completely sublimate and escape in the form of a gas in the soap bubbles.

Crystal "Bubble" Ball

Supplies:

  • Dry ice
  • Heavy work gloves
  • Glass mixing bowl with rounded rim (less than 12” in diameter)
  • Tray or cookie sheet
  • Very warm water
  • Dawn dish soap
  • Strip of cotton fabric (old t-shirt)
  • Small plastic cup

Directions:

  1. Mix 2 tablespoons dish soap with 1 tablespoon warm water in the small cup. Submerge the cotton strip in the cup to soak.
  2. Fill the glass bowl half full with very warm water. Place on tray or cookie sheet. Add a few chunks of dry ice to the water so that a lot of “fog” is produced.
  3. Dip a finger in the soap/water solution and run your finger around the rim of the bowl, wetting the rim surface.
  4. Remove the cotton strip from the cup, running your fingers down it to remove excess soap. Stretch the cloth between your hands and slowly pull the soapy cloth across the rim of the bowl. Your goal is to create a soap film that stretches across the entire bowl.
    *It might take a little practice to master the technique! The thin layer of soap stretched across the rim of the bowl traps the expanding cloud of carbon dioxide gas to create a giant bubble … a kind of crystal ball perfect for looking into the future!

III. FROG EYES (Edible Water Beads):

Supplies:

  • Tapioca pearls
  • Food coloring (if desired)
  • Pot for boiling water
  • Colander
  • Container for bead play

Directions:

  1. Follow instructions on package for boiling Tapioca.
  2. Once boiled, rinse Tapioca under cool water.
  3. If desired, divide pearls into separate containers, add food coloring, let sit for about 15 minutes, then rinse.
  4. Place beads into container and have fun!
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MAKE: Cupcake Liner Monsters

Pick up your Cupcake Liner Monster Take and Make at area PPLD Libraries beginning this Friday, Oct. 23, 2020

Supplies:

  • Construction paper
  • 1 cupcake liner
  • Googly eyes
  • 1 craft stick
  • Glue (not in Take and Make)
  • Scissors (not in Take and Make)
  • Markers (optional)

Directions:

  1. Start by flattening your cupcake liner and glue it onto the piece of construction paper to give it more weight. Cut out the cupcake liner.
  2. Cut out a mouth, arms, legs, horns, and teeth (or whatever you want on your monster) from your construction paper and glue them onto your cupcake liner. Glue the googly eyes onto your puppet. Make it scary or silly!
  3. Add some glue to the top of your craft stick and glue your cupcake liner onto it. Once it has dried completely, you can have fun putting on a puppet show with your monster puppet!

For video instructions, check out last Tuesday, October 20's video for detailed instructions with one of our librarians here: https://youtu.be/e60Ig4x0XXQ?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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STEM: Clothespin Button Racers

The Take and Make for this project will be available at area PPLD Libraries starting Fri., Oct. 16, 2020.

Supplies:

  • 1 plastic straw
  • 2 twist ties (or bread ties) or two paper clips
  • 1 clothespin
  • 4 same size buttons
  • Scissors

Directions:

  1. Cut 2 straw pieces that are each about 1 inch long.
  2. Slide a twist tie through each straw.
  3. Use the bread tie to secure a button at each end of the straw by looping the tie back through the button hole.
  4. Clip one axle to the clothespin.
  5. Slide the second axle into the back of the clothespin as close to the spring as possible.
  6. Use a rubber band to secure it in place.
  7. Begin racing!

racer 1racer 2racer 3

racer 4

Find the tutorial video at: https://ppld.librarymarket.com/virtual-stem-clothespin-racers

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Tween Twist: Dragon Eggs

TAKE AND MAKE: Tween Twist: Dragon Eggs
Pick up your Take and Make supplies at area PPLD Libraries starting this Fri., Oct. 9, 2020

Supplies:

  • Styrofoam egg
  • Box of thumbtacks
  • glue
  • toothpick
  • Optional supplies: Sharpie markers, nail polish, or rhinestones

Watch the “how to” video on PPLD TV https://youtu.be/YyPNAoIxy3w

Directions:

  1. Start the dragon egg at the very bottom of the Styrofoam egg. You can glue this “starter” tack in for stability.
  2. Insert tacks into the egg so that they overlap the “starter” tack and each other. The tacks overlap like fish scales.
  3. Keep adding tacks, overlapping them as you move up the egg and cover it with tacks.
  4. You will put a final tack at the very top. You can also glue this tack to help it stay in.
  5. You can add glue to any tacks that feel loose or like they might fall out. Use a toothpick to push the glue in where it needs to go.
  6. If desired, you can use colored sharpies, nail polish, and/or rhinestones to further decorate your egg.

dragon egg 1dragon egg 2

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STEM: Zany Zip Line

Supplies:

(Pick up your Take and Make for this project at area PPLD libraries starting this Friday, Oct. 2)

  • String (fishing line, or unwaxed dental floss)
  • Pipe cleaners
  • Binder clips
  • Several large paper clips
  • Recycled container to use for carrier (yogurt container, paper cups, empty boxes, etc.)
  • Hole punch or scissors
  • Masking tape and/or scotch tape
  • Paper and pencil
  • Small plastic animal

Directions:

To make your carrier:

  1. Brainstorm how you want to make your carrier and what you want to make it out of.
  2. Punch holes in the sides of the container for the pipe cleaners.
  3. Thread the pipe cleaner(s) through the holes and twist them into place.
  4. Add binder clip or paper clip to act as your pulley.

To set up your zip line:

  1. Run a 4-foot length of string between two objects, such as a chair and a stack of books on the ground.
  2. Be sure the zip line is at least two feet higher on one end than on the other.
  3. Use masking tape or scotch tape to attach your string. You want to be able to easily undo one end of the zip line to attach the carrier to it.

Zany ziplineZany zipline

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/yAJUMuPC0Vc?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFeL2073EuA0bc6TD1nM8wUN

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Parenting Little Ones: Q&A Series

Have questions about parenting little ones? PPLD's Family Place Libraries hosted a five-week fall series on Zoom where caregivers can ask questions of community professionals in the fields of child development, nutrition, speech/language, and more. Next series is coming in April 2021!

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PPLD Homeschool: Cooking Up Some Fun!

Submit a recipe to Pikes Peak Library District's A Harvest of Recipes digital cookbook!
Use this link to upload your recipe: https://ppld.librariesshare.com/ppldrecipes/

Some Fun Facts about Grilled Cheese
❖ Though similar recipes were mentioned in ancient Roman texts, the grilled cheese sandwich was technically invented in France in 1910, known as the Croque Monsieur.
❖ However, most experts agree that the first grilled cheese sandwiches were made in the United States in the 1920s when Otto Frederick Rohwedder invented a bread slicer that made distributing white bread easy and affordable.
❖ Shortly before that, processed cheese has been patented by James L. Kraft, whose pasteurizing process ensured that cheese would not spoil, even when transported great distances (the first Kraft plant opened in Illinois in 1914).
❖ During WWII, Navy Cooks prepared open faced grilled cheese sandwiches on Navy ships as instructed by government issued cookbooks. These sandwiches were called “American Cheese Filling Sandwiches.”
❖ In 1949, people finally began to add the second slice of bread to the top of this sandwich to make it more filling, and the sandwich we all know and love was born.
❖ The name “grilled cheese” wasn’t used until the 1960s; before then it was called “toasted cheese” or “melted cheese” sandwiches.
❖ Approximately 3/4 of people who buy sliced cheese make at least one grilled cheese sandwich per month.
❖ National Grilled Cheese Day is celebrated on April 12th!

Recipes:(Please use adult help with slicing or heating!)
Watch these grilled cheese recipes at: https://youtu.be/6_hqpb7EO4k

I. Allison’s Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Ingredients:
Bread
Butter
Cheese slices (thin)
Optional (onion, apple, kale)
Stone ground mustard
--experiment with your own ingredients—
Instructions:
Butter bread slices on one side, flip slices over and add mustard to insides of bread.
Stack up ingredients between bread slices.
Place in heated frying pan (low to medium heat); cover with lid.
Cook on low to med. heat until bread is toasty and golden on one side; flip over until done. Cheese should be melted.

II. Betty’s Gluten and Dairy Free Grilled Cheese Sandwich
Ingredients:
Gluten-free bread
Vegan butter spread
Sliced vegan “cheese”
Avocado (optional)
Mustard
Instructions:
Butter bread slices on one side, flip slices over and add sliced cheese.
Scoop out avocado and spread (if desired); add mustard to top slice.
Place in heated frying pan (low to medium heat); cover with lid.
Cook on low to med. heat until bread is toasty and golden on one side; flip over until done. Adjust heat as needed. Cheese should be melted.

III. Brady’s Grilled Cheese
Ingredients:
Whole wheat bread (or bread of your choice)
Butter
Garlic clove (broken open)
Mayonnaise
Cheese slices (American, grated cheddar, or your choice)
Instructions:
Cover all sides of bread with mayonnaise.
Heat non-stick electric griddle; carefully rub with butter and clove of garlic.
Place one slice of bread on hot pan.
Add cheese; top with other slice of bread.
Cook until bread is toasty and golden on one side; flip over until done.
Cheese should be melted.

IV. Amanda’s Easy Creamy Microwave Tomato Soup in a Mug
Ingredients:
7 oz. diced tomatoes
½ tbsp. tomato paste
½ cup broth
1/8 cup light cream
Optional (to taste): sweet yellow onion, basil, pesto, salt and pepper
Supplies:
Mug
Blender
Microwave
Instructions:
Add all ingredients together in blender.
Blend until smooth.
Transfer soup into a microwave safe mug.
Microwave for one minute.
Let cool and enjoy!

V. Athena’s Cake in a Mug Recipe
Ingredients:
1/4 cup flour
2 tbs. sugar
1/2 tsp. baking powder
A pinch of salt
1/4 cup milk
1 tbs. oil
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
Instructions:
Pour the dry ingredients into your mug and mix.
Add the wet ingredients, and then mix until there are no large clumps or dry flour at the bottom of the mug.
Microwave for 90 seconds. (You may need to adjust this 10 seconds in either direction, based on your microwave's power.)
Be careful pulling the hot mug out of the microwave!
At this point, you could add some icing or a scoop of ice cream, or eat your cake plain. Enjoy!

Citations and Resources:
“Kids Vs. Science: Making The Greatest Grilled Cheese;” Mental Floss video; https://youtube.com/watch?v=tAN6vC7-YeA
“How chemistry creates the perfect, gooey grilled cheese sandwich;” PBS News Hour; http://pbs.org/newshour/science/grilled-cheese-chemistry-forever
“What a cheesy sandwich looks like in 15 places around the world;” Insider; http://insider.com/grilled-cheese-around-the-world-2018-10
“History of the Grilled Cheese Sandwich;” Daily Dish Magazine; http://foodiefriendsfridaydailydish.com/national-grilled-cheese-month-hi...
“The History of the Grilled Cheese;” The Committed Pig blog;
http://www.thecommittedpig.com/the-history-of-the-grilled-cheese-and-how...
“The History of the Grilled Cheese Sandwich;”
https://recipes.howstuffworks.com/history-of-grilled-cheese.htm

Photo by Micheile Henderson on Unsplash

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Piratepalooza! Books "RRRR" Me Treasure

SUPPLIES:

  • Pirate Coloring Sheet Find and print it here: http://www.getcoloringpages.com/coloring/96888
  • Crayons or markers
  • Glue (liquid glue and a glue stick)
  • One piece of thin cardboard cut from cereal box, or one piece of heavy cardstock or poster board
  • Sparkly things for treasure:
    • Sequins
    • Sparkly confetti
    • Craft “bling”
    • Coins cut or punched from shiny paper or foil— shiny gift bags and tags work great!
    • Jewelry or crowns—make from sparkly pipe cleaners, shiny narrow cord or ribbon, shiny paper or craft bling

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Print the pirate coloring sheet
  2. Color the picture and write Books “RRRR” Me Treasure! near the top of the page
  3. Glue cardboard or cardstock on the back of the picture for extra support
  4. Using glue, add sparkly items for treasure

Watch this storytime at: https://youtu.be/qIVYeIzjeT0

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KidsMake: Magnetic Tracks

Take and Makes for this project will be available starting this Friday, Sept. 18, 2020 at PPLD Libraries and are recommended for kids, ages 5-12.

Supplies:

  • Paper or paper plate
  • Markers or crayons
  • Glue or glue dot or 2-sided tape
  • Magnet
  • Craft stick

Directions:

  1. Use the provided paper or your own supplies to draw a shape to race around on your magnet track. You might choose a vehicle (car, truck, train, boat, etc.), an animal (cow, fish, turtle, dog, etc.), or something entirely different. It should be small enough to go on your paper plate (less than 2 inches).
  2. Attach a magnet to the back using double-sided tape or a glue dot.
  3. Use your own markers, crayons, or colored pencils to create a course on your race track.
  4. Use double-sided tape or a glue to to attach a magnet to the end of your craft stick. Before you glue, you need to make sure that the magnet on the car and the magnet on the stick attract rather than repel each other. If they repel each other, turn the magnet for the stick over before attaching.
  5. Test your track! Set your shape (vehicle, animal, or other) on your track. Use the magnet on the craft stick under the plate to move and race the car.

Have fun!

Find the tutorial video at https://ppld.librarymarket.com/virtual-kidsmake-magnetic-race-tracks

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STEM: Solar Science

Supplies:

In Take and Make kit (pick up a kit starting 9/11/20 at any PPLD Library, while supplies last)

  • UV beads
  • Pipe cleaner
  • Paper plate
  • Pencil
  • Black construction paper
  • Template pdf below

You supply:

  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Clock face template (pdf to print below)
  • Natural objects from outside: rocks, weeds, flowers, leaves, etc.

Directions:

  1. UV beads illustrate some of the harmful effects of the sun and therefore, why we use sunscreen. UV light is one type of light from the sun. We can’t see it, but insects and birds can. While this UV light can help our bodies produce Vitamin D, too much of it can also cause sunburn or skin damage. Take the UV beads in your kit and string them on a pipe cleaner to make a bracelet. Go outside to watch them react to the UV rays – even on a cloudy day. You might also want to experiment with sunscreen, sunglasses, or windows and see what happens!
  2. You can also use the power of the sun, construction paper, and natural objects to create a work of art. Take your piece of paper and place it in a sunny place. You may need to weight it down. Place natural objects on the paper and leave it all in the sun for several hours. The UV rays of the sun help break down the dye in the paper creating your design. We found that we had to tape down some of the objects so they didn’t blow away. If you use tape, be careful that it doesn’t show.
  3. Next, you can make a sundial clock. Decorate the plate if you’d like. Cut out and glue the clock face to the back side of the plate. Poke the pencil through the center of the plate and take it outside. You’ll need to place the clock with the “12” facing north to determine the correct time. Watch how your clock tells time during the day.

These activities are based on:

http://solar-center.stanford.edu/activities/UVBeads/UV-Bead-Instructions...

https://www.scholastic.com/parents/school-success/learning-toolkit-blog/...

https://www.raisingarizonakids.com/2015/06/how-to-make-sundial-clock/

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Manitou Springs Library is Relocating

New co-location offers dozens of new Library services thanks to MAC’s facilities

Library lovers in Manitou Springs will have a wealth of new resources at their fingertips this December.
Manitou Springs Library and Manitou Art Center (MAC) will officially collocate their services beginning in December of 2020. Now, a PPLD library card will help Library users find music, theatre, visual art and the vast resources and services of the public library all in one place.

“We are thrilled to pair our physical collection and other library services with an organization so focused on helping users create, learn, exhibit, perform, and connect with others in Manitou Springs,” said PPLD Chief Librarian and CEO John Spears. “MAC’s facility will immeasurably enhance what we can provide in the Manitou Springs community.”

Get your limited edition library card soon!

Congratulations to artist Susan Odiam of Manitou Springs! Her original creation will be featured on our limited edition card to celebrate the relocation of Manitou Springs Library to the Manitou Arts Center.

The Manitou Springs Library will be housed inside of the MAC while still providing access and use for MAC supporters, local artists, and tenant community partners. PPLD will provide staff support, a physical collection of books and other Library materials, and access to meeting rooms and creative spaces for Library patrons. MAC members and artists will still maintain benefits while gaining more opportunities and exposure.

“We have already experienced great success partnering with PPLD on a number of initiatives, and the MAC is excited about this opportunity, which will allow us to do even more for the community,” said MAC Executive Director Natalie Johnson.

“We’re excited to see what other long-term benefits arise from this venture, like increasing access to the MAC and expanding PPLD opportunities in Manitou Springs. We will leverage each other’s strengths of service.”

PPLD and MAC officially entered into a co-location agreement last month. This co-location partnership and move is taking place as the City of Manitou Springs determines what to do with the historic Carnegie building, owned by the City and currently leased by PPLD for the Manitou Springs Library through the end of 2020.

“PPLD’s departure provides the City with necessary time to plan for the building’s future, while allowing the Library to adequately serve the public,” said Spears. “The move will be beneficial for PPLD cardholders, MAC members, local artists, community partners, taxpayers and the local economy.

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Water Balloon Parachute

TAKE AND MAKE: Water Balloon Parachute
Can your water balloons survive a big drop? Find out with this experiment.
Pick up your Take and Make kit at PPLD Libraries starting September 4, 2020

Supplies:

  • One balloon
  • Water
  • One plastic shopping bag
  • One rubber band

Directions:

  1. Add water to your balloon, don't fill the balloon, leave lots of room to tie the balloon closed.
  2. Cut the ends of the handles of the bags. Tie or rubber band them to the knotted end of a water balloon.
  3. Go outside and drop it from a high place to see if it breaks when it lands.
  4. Test and retest until your balloon breaks.
  5. Try it again with another balloon.

See what else you can attach to your parachute and let drop.

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SDA AwardThere are nearly 3,000 special districts in the state of Colorado, including library districts, park districts, water districts, fire districts, and many others. Every year, one district from those thousands is chosen by the Special District Association of Colorado to receive its highest honor, the J. Evan Goulding District of the Year Award. We are excited to announce that the SDA has chosen Pikes Peak Library District as this year's recipient!


The J. Evan Goulding District of the Year Award was established by the SDA Board of Directors to single out a district that demonstrates exceptional leadership and community spirit. This award recognizes a district's major accomplishments, series of outstanding efforts, and a steady determination to serve its constituency. This year's winner, Pikes Peak Library District, truly exemplifies these qualities.

The history of public libraries in the Pikes Peak Region began in October 1885 when the Colorado Springs Social Union established a library in downtown Colorado Springs. In 1905, a new library opened with funds donated by Andrew Carnegie and land granted by General William Jackson Palmer. In 1962, a majority of El Paso County citizens voted to establish a special taxing district, and Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) was formed. After not joining the District initially in 1962, the town of Manitou Springs subsequently voted to join PPLD at the beginning of 2013.

As the second largest library system in Colorado, PPLD serves a population of more than 660,000 residents in El Paso
County, with the exception of Security/Widefield School District #3. This includes all unincorporated areas and municipalities of Calhan, Colorado Springs, Ellicott, Falcon, Fountain, Manitou Springs, Monument, and Palmer Lake. The District is able to serve such a large number of citizens thanks to an employee base of nearly 475 full-and part-time staff and almost 1,700 volunteers. PPLD’s Board of Trustees consists of seven members from the community. The citizen volunteers are appointed jointly by the Colorado Springs City Council and El Paso County Commissioners for a maximum of two five-year terms.

The District currently operates 16 facilities throughout the county. In addition to the large collections of physical and digital materials that are available, a number of sites also feature state-of-the art services, such as makerspaces and studios. PPLD’s makerspaces offer access to tools, materials, and machines to help bring patrons’ creative visions to life. Equipment such as 3D printers; laser engraving and cutting machines; and assorted handicraft and art tools are all available for use. In the District’s studios, Library cardholders have access to items such as cameras, audio mixers, and even a green screen to produce professional-grade recordings. Moreover, the District operates a three-vehicle mobile fleet that delivers Library services to more rural and remote areas as well as to communities for individuals who have limited mobility.

The District has also established a number of strategic partnerships to help serve their local community. For example, the new Pikes Peak Culture Pass program allows patrons to explore museums and attractions in the Pikes Peak region at no cost. By collaborating with local organizations, PPLD provides free admission passes for check out, increasing opportunities for education and cultural learning. In addition, the District has expanded its adult learning programs in recent years. Career Online High School is an online high school diploma and career certification program provided by PPLD. Students can choose a major from a list of high-growth, high-demand career fields and complete coursework to develop the skills and knowledge that employers are looking for. The District also offers English as a Second Language classes and food industry training.

In 2018, in partnership with The Place (formerly Urban Peak Colorado Springs), the District launched a first-of-its-kind initiative in Colorado aimed at helping teen runaways and youth experiencing homelessness. The partnership resulted in PPLD locations becoming a part of the National Safe Place Network. As a part of this network, an at-risk youth can enter the library and ask for help. From there, the library staff can contact The Place who will then arrive and begin to find the appropriate assistance.

During the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the District transformed its library services to expand access beyond the traditional use of libraries. PPLD launched a number of virtual programs and began offering curbside services. When the pandemic first began and there was concern over a shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE), the District became involved with a group called Make4COVID, whose wide network of members worked together to 3D print PPE. As part of the effort, PPLD distributed several of its larger 3D printers to makers in the community who were then able to make face shield parts in the safety of their own homes. The District staff also used sewing machines and smaller 3D printers to assist in this vital work.

For nearly 60 years, Pikes Peak Library District has welcomed all members of their local community to enrich their minds, make connections, and reach their full potential. Through innovative initiatives and programming, resourcefulness, and responsiveness to the needs of their patrons, the District is truly living its mission to provide library resources and services that impact lives and build community across El Paso County.

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Tween Twist: Banned Books Wearables (Mini-Charms)

Link to tutorial on YouTube: https://youtu.be/vJyL_xqPI0E

Supplies needed:

  • Book template printed on cardstock
  • Book cover printed on paper
  • Glue Stick
  • Blank paper
  • Needle & thread
  • Jump ring
  • Optional: Key chain ring or necklace chord

Directions:

  1. Cut out a cardstock book template and the book cover of your choice (see pdf files below).
  2. Use the glue stick to glue the cover to the book template.
  3. Crease the flaps around the edges.
  4. Cut out 4-6 rectangles that you will fold in half to make the book’s pages. You can eyeball this, but they will be approximately 4.75 cm x 3.5 cm.
  5. Line up the pages and fold in half. This stack of folded pages is called a “signature”. Trim if necessary so that the pages fit in the book.
  6. Thread a needle with about 6 inches of thread.
  7. Sew the pages together with a pamphlet stitch. You will be poking 3 holes in the crease of the folded pages: one in the top, one in the middle, and one in the bottom. You can mark these holes with pencil beforehand if you would like to.
  8. Start by poking the needle in through the middle of the crease (see picture). The needle should go through the back of the pages and come out inside the inner fold. Leave a couple of inches of thread hanging out the back. Hold these 3 inches while you sew and do not let them pull through. You will be tying a knot with them at the end.
  9. Push the needle up through the top of the pages (inside to outside).
  10. Go back down near the bottom of the pages (outside to inside).
  11. Pull the needle one last time through the center hole.
  12. Use the thread you left hanging out the back and the thread still on the needle to tie a square knot—right over left, then left over right.
  13. Flip the cover template over, line up the pages of the signature you’ve just sewn, and use a glue stick to glue the leftmost and rightmost pages of the signature to the inside of the template.
  14. Run your glue stick over all the tabs of the cover template and then press them onto the two glued pages until the folio is fully secured to the cover template on both sides.
  15. Fold both sides of the spine with your fingers to finish your book!
  16. Now use the needle to poke a hole through the top of the spine all the way through to the inside. Widen the hole by wiggling the needle.
  17. Open a jump ring with your fingers by holding it in front of you and pulling one side forward while you push the other back. Do not open by pulling the sides outward or it will not fully close.
  18. Poke the jump ring through the hole you’ve created. You may have to go back and widen the hole further. At this point, you can attach a key ring to it or string it on a chord to make a necklace. Close the jump ring when you’re done!
  19. Voila! You have a miniature book charm. If you want it to lay flat, you can place it under a light object/between two objects overnight to make it stay fully closed. You could optionally paint it with mod podge to keep it safe from wear and tear!

Show off what you've made by entering our PPLD Challenge: Banned Books Art.

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All You Need Is Your Library

At Pikes Peak Library District, you can do anything you set your mind to. We, of course, offer books at each of our libraries. But did you know you can also get help with at-home education, do virtual yoga, learn a new language, discover your family tree, stream music, watch movies, and more? PPLD offers so many exciting things, it’s hard to capture them all! Learn more about what all you can access with your library card below.

Thanks to the public’s investment and taxpayer support, Pikes Peak Library District can provide Library resources and services to all cardholders for free. You can learn more about PPLD's budget and expenditures here.

My Library: Kids Edition!


Getting your Library Card

Click here to learn more.


My Account

From managing your holds, interlibrary loans, set notification preferences, and more! Click here to learn more.


Download the App


The Catalog

Find books, eBooks, audiobooks, music, movies, video games, board games, and more! Click here for instructions on using the catalog.


eLearning

Find help and support for your at-home learning endeavors at ppld.org/eLearning.


eBooks


Audiobooks


Movies & TV Shows


Music


Programs

Click here to see our full calendar of events


Magazines & Newspapers


Languages

Mango Languages


Genealogy Research


Homework & Homeschool Help


Personal & Professional Development


Databases

Research Guides

And More...

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Storytime@Home: Digital Storytime Materials

Missing Storytime at your favorite Library? Our Family and Children's Services librarians are creating Storytime at Home materials for you and you family to enjoy. Every themed Storytime includes top literary picks with easy links to our online Catalog, music, crafting, and literacy tips. Click the photos or the link for more information about each activity.

Get yours by following @PPLDKids on Facebook or get them straight to your email! Subscribe here!


All Storytimes:

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