What's New!

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ice lantern

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries starting Friday, Jan. 14, 2022. Watch this project (a favorite from last winter) at: https://youtu.be/1spsamOSMtg?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu/

Supplies:

  • Plastic cups in 2 sizes
  • Pipe cleaners
  • Pompoms and other doodads or baubles or other items of your choice
  • Battery operated tea light candle
  • Tape
  • Water
  • Freezer
  • Paper towel
  • Additional baubles or doodads
  • Weights, like rocks

Directions:

This is an engineering challenge! For more step-by-step pictures of project, open pdf link below.

  1. Twist your pipe cleaners up the inside of the larger cup.
  2. Slide the smaller cup inside with the pipe cleaners in between the large and small cups.
  3. Carefully push pompoms and/or other baubles or doodads between the 2 cups also.
  4. With the tops of the cups even, crisscross two pieces of tape across the top of the cups.
  5. Placing cups on a paper towel, gently fill the larger cup with water until it’s about 1 inch from the top. You do not want water to go into the smaller cup. You may need to add something to weigh down the smaller cup.
  6. Place in the freezer until it’s frozen solid. This could take about 5 hours.
  7. Observe your creation! You may notice that the smaller cup is higher as is the water/ice level. This is a great illustration of how water expands as it changes states from a liquid to a solid.
  8. Remove from freezer and let sit about 10 mins., carefully remove the smaller cup (and tape). Then remove the larger cup. You may need to cut the cups off.
  9. Turn on the battery operated candle and place it in the center of your lantern. Put your lantern outside to admire!

Based on https://www.steampoweredfamily.com/activities/engineering-ice-lantern-s…

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At home calapult

Create a catapult using things from around the house. This project is only limited by your imagination and the things you find around the house!
Supplies:

  • Cylindrical object (sturdy cardboard tube, soup or other can, sturdy plastic bottle, rolling pin)
  • Stretchy hair elastic or rubber band
  • Spoon (wooden, metal, or combination)
  • Something to propel (ball, marshmallow, pompom, wad of paper, etc.)

Directions:

  1. Wrap the hair elastic or rubber band around your cylindrical object twice.
  2. Slide your spoon under the elastic where it meets in an X. It should be perpendicular to the cylindrical object.
  3. Load a projectile in the bowl of the spoon. Apply force to the opposite end of the spoon and watch it fly.
  4. Experiment with a variety of objects. What combination propels your object the farthest?
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Homeschool Art Show blog

It’s time to get creative!

Homeschoolers, grades K - 12, can submit one artwork (drawing, painting, sculpture, needlework, etc.)  for this non-juried exhibit.

Submit your art between Mon., Mar. 21 - Tue., Mar. 29, 2022.

Artwork will be dropped off and displayed at the East Library Children’s Department throughout the month of April.

Contact jfleishhacker@ppld.org for more information.

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origamienvelope

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, Dec. 17, 2021.

Supplies & Directions:

Step 1
Gather your supplies.
Provided in your bag: 2 blank sheets of paper to make 2 envelopes, stickers
From home: colored pencils/crayons/markers

Step 2
Cut your blank sheet of paper into a square (just fold over and trim part of the bottom off; you
might need a grownup’s help with this).

Step 3
Fold your square of paper into an envelope following the steps seen in the pdf link below.

Step 4
After your envelope is folded, decorate your envelope with stickers and whatever else you like! And send it to someone
special!

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Star projector

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Supplies and Directions:

Supplies in Take and Make:

  • Cup
  • Toothpick
  • Sticker
  • Flashlight
  • Big Dipper template

Supplies you provide:

  • Scissors
  • Blank paper and crayons or markers, optional

Directions:

  1. Cut your Big Dipper template out on the dotted line.
  2. Turn your cup upside down and use the sticker to attach the template to the bottom of the cup.
  3. Use the toothpick to poke a hole in each “star”.
  4. Get your flashlight. Turn off the room lights and cover the windows.
  5. Shine the light through the cup and onto the table or flat surface. Experiment to find the spot where you see the Big Dipper.

Think about it:
What could you do if you had a second flashlight? Could you make the Big Dipper disappear without turning off your flashlight?
Try this with a friend:
Get a flashlight for each of you. Have one of you be the Starmaker and one the Sunshine.
The Starmaker should project the Big Dipper onto your surface.
While the Starmaker has the Big Dipper projected, the Sunshine should use their flashlight to mimic the rising sun. What do you see?
What about when the Sunshine mimics the setting sun?
Think about it:
Why do stars only come out at night?
Is the sun the only light source that keeps us from seeing stars?
Is it harder to see stars in the city or country?
Follow up:
Can you make other constellations?
Can you find the Big Dipper outside in the night sky? Why or why not?
Can you draw a backdrop on which to project your constellation?
Based on https://mysteryscience.com/sky/mystery-5/stars-daily-patterns/128

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Jean Ciavonne 2022 Unexpected Garden blog

Unexpected Gardens: Poems on Everyday Bravery

Open Wed., Dec. 1 - Tue., March 1

The award ceremony date is tentatively set for Sat., April 16


Plants look for ways to survive beyond any given odds and it takes bravery to bloom where we’re not expected. How do we create habitats in which we can blossom and grow? Looking back at the last couple of years, how do you describe survival and thriving? What does everyday bravery look like to you?

Questions to ask yourself as you write your poem:

  • Can we see, smell, hear, and taste the imagery in your poem?
  • Have you used rich vocabulary that tells us a story or paints a picture?
  • Does your poem reflect the theme?

Six winners will receive a book and $50 each! The contest is open to all fourth and fifth graders in the Pikes Peak region.


Eligibility:

Open to all fourth and fifth graders in the Pikes Peak Region.

Contest Rules:

  1. One entry per student. Teachers are urged to review poems and submit no more than five per class.
  2. Each poem must be the original work of the contestant.
  3. Poems will be judged on originality, including poem title and adherence to the theme.
  4. Submit two typed, double-spaced copies of each poem on 8 ½” x 11” paper (no handwritten submissions or illustrations will be accepted.) Include ON A SEPARATE PIECE OF PAPER: name, telephone number, home address, school name and address, and teacher and principal’s names. Poems will not be returned. Please keep a copy.
  5. Entries must be postmarked by Tue., March 1, 2022.

Submission of a poem constitutes full permission to exhibit, use and publish the poem for any purpose – printed or electronic media – and to publish the name, school, and photographs of the student without compensation.

Submissions

Entries may be mailed to:

The Jean Ciavonne Poetry Contest

c/o Christa Funke

Pikes Peak Library District

P.O. Box 1579

Colorado Springs, CO 80901-1579

 

For more information, contact Evan Childress: echildress@ppld.org


2021 Winners:


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tweenbracelet

Take and Makes for this project, for ages 9-12, will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, Dec 3, 2021. Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/7UU9Yarq59Y?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFebLULGu2RriY_RSSZgaH-X

Supplies & Directions:

Supplies provided in kit: cord, beads, keychain ring
Supplies from home: scissors

  1. Write down the initials of your name and decode them using the binary code key provided. (Or see pdf below for the code key.)
  2. Use blue and green beads to represent 0 and 1 - one color will represent the number zero, and the other color will represent the number one.
  3. Tie a double knot at the end of your cord.
  4. Put the beads for your first initial on the cord.
  5. Tie another double knot to separate the initials.
  6. Put the beads for your second initial on the cord.
  7. Tie a double knot.
  8. Use the remaining cord to either tie the beads around your wrist as a bracelet, or affix the cord to the keychain ring. Cut off any access cord. Enjoy your binary bracelet or keychain!

*This project was created in honor of Hour of Code. Learn more about Hour of Code at code.org!

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journal

Take and Makes for this project (ages 7 and up) are currently available at PPLD area libraries.

Watch the Giving Thanks video tutorial on YouTube: https://youtu.be/6oRb42V4l-E?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

Supplies and Directions:

Supplies Included: Gratitude Journal (cover and pages—pages are already in the correct order); stickers for decorating; ribbon for securing pages and decoration

Supplies from Home: Crayons, markers, and/or pens; stapler or hole punch; scissors; glue stick or Elmer’s glue; old magazines or photos to cut for a collage. (A collage is a visual art form that uses photographs or paper/fabric images that are glued onto a backing.)
You can find all the instructions with explanatory photos in the video!

Step 1: Prepare Your Gratitude Journal

  1. The pages of your Gratitude Journal should already be in order. Make sure the Rainbow Journal page is on top. (This page is a full spread, so it needs to be in the middle of your journal.) The cardstock Cover should be on the bottom of the stack (it will form a front and back cover after folding in half).
  2. Carefully arrange your pages and cover making sure that all edges are even. Fold the cover and pages in half with a sharp crease using your thumb or the side of a pen.
  3. Stapler Method: Secure pages to the Cover using a stapler. Staple as close to the center crease as you can (without stapling over the crease). Staple the top and bottom of your journal.
  4. Hole Puncher Method: Hole punch on the crease at the top and the bottom. Use the ribbon included or any yarn, string, or twine you like to thread through the holes. Secure ribbon with a knot or bow on the cover (outside) of your journal.

Step 2: Be Creative (or Not) in Designing the Cover

  1. Write your name on the line provided. Be creative: use a fancy pen or marker; use a fancy writing style.
  2. Add stickers to decorate
  3. OR draw or collage to decorate
  4. OR just leave it as is. It’s up to you!

Step 3: Find a Comfortable Place, Choose a Page, and Begin Journaling
There are many ways to journal. You can free write on the topic of gratitude and thankfulness. Also, you can use various art forms. Try our acrostic poem page. Or create collage pages with copies of photos or old magazine images. Drawing is another way to express yourself in your journal. Most of all, make your Gratitude Journal meaningful to you.

Why a Gratitude Journal?
Studies show that practicing gratitude makes us happier. Focusing on people and things that you are thankful for can help you feel joyful.
When we express appreciation, it is good for friendships. When we tell people thank you and what you like about them, it helps us focus on the positive things about a person, and then we feel better about our friendships. Telling someone what you like about them or acknowledging a person’s kindness helps them to feel good, too.

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Celebrate the Holidays with PPLD 2021 Blog

From cookbooks and classes, DIY gifts, holiday playlists, and winter strolls and more! PPLD has all the programs, tools, and resources to help you make the best of the holiday season!

Resources


December 2021 National, Public, Religious, Weird Holidays


PPLD Friends Bookstore

Get gifts for your family while supporting your Library! The Friends sponsors and supports numerous programs and events to further the enjoyment of reading and love for books for all individuals. The Friends of PPLD are best known for their volunteerism, their bookstores in each library (you never know what you will find in the ever-changing inventory of previously-read books and magazines) and, of course, the bi-annual Friends Book Sales.

Books, CDs, Movies, Magazines, and more from $.25 to $3 Or shop for specialty items online!

Do you love books, reading and libraries? Have you considered becoming involved in your community? One easy step covers it all! JOIN THE FRIENDS NOW!


Programs


Take and Makes

  • Finger-Knit Winter Garland

    Decorate your home for the winter season with this easy finger-knit garland.

  • Binary Code Bracelets

    Celebrate Hour of Code by using beads to create a bracelet or keychain with your initials in binary, the language of computers. For ages 9+.

  • STEM Star Projector

    Create a star maker to make a model of the Big Dipper or other constellation to shine onto a dark wall! For ages 5-12. Available while supplies last.

  • Origami Envelopes

    Get creative and craft a fun origami envelope! For ages 5-12. Available while supplies last.


Support your library with a charitable gift today! Click here to make your donation. Thank you!


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dinorama

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, Nov. 12, 2021.

Supplies and Directions:

Step 1
Gather your supplies.
Provided in your bag: cardstock, clay, moss, dinosaur
From home: colored pencils/crayons/markers, scissors, tape
Step 2
Cut your cardstock strip so that you have a strip to make the ground of your dinosaur habitat and a strip to make a background (you might need a grownup’s help with this).
Step 3
Decorate both strips of cardstock with your markers. Maybe there are a bunch of leafy plants in the background or a big sun; maybe the ground has a river running through it.
Step 4
Secure your strips with tape so the background stands up.
Step 5
Now add the 3D things! Use the clay to mold rocks, mountains, dino eggs - whatever you like!
Add the moss to give your habitat some extra plant life. Finally, name your dino and put them in
their new home!

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tattoo

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, Nov. 5, 2021.

Supplies and Directions:

Materials we provide: Dry Erase Marker
Materials you provide: Glass or ceramic surface (Pyrex pans, plates, bathtubs, etc.), Water

  1. Draw a picture on your smooth glass/ceramic surface with a dry erase marker.
  2. Cover the drawing with some water (the warmer the better).
  3. Watch while your drawing lifts off the surface and floats around on the water!
  4. You can push the drawing around to your heart’s content.
  5. After you have watched your drawings come to life in the water, stick your hand into the swirling color and it will stick to your skin like a tattoo!

TIPS:

  • You will be more successful if you draw a solid picture (e.g. a solid shape).
  • When the drawing lifts off the surface, it will not maintain its shape.
  • The skin tattoo will wash off very easily.

This works because dry erase markers are mostly made up of alcohol and a release agent made of silicon oils. When you write on the plate or Pyrex dish, the alcohol evaporates and just leaves behind the ink and release agent. We all know that oil and water don’t mix, so the ink with the oils in the release agent just float to the top!

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animal crossing keychain

Take and Makes for this project for ages 9-12 will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, Oct 29, 2021.

Supplies and Directions:

Supplies Included: Mini glass bottle, jump ring, metal eye hook, keyring, mini recipe card
Supplies Needed (from home): scissors, pliers, clear glue.

  1. Cut out the DIY mini recipe card (there’s an extra just in case). Remove the tape from the cork and discard. Take the cork out of the bottle and remove the metal eye hook and the jump ring. Place the recipe card in the bottle.
  2. Screw the metal eye hook into the center of the top of the cork by hand.
  3. Take the jump ring and loop it through the metal eye hook and the end of the key ring to connect the cork to the keyring.
  4. Use pliers to close the jump ring.
  5. Apply glue to the edges of the cork, and place in the bottle. Put the cork back in the bottle, pressing down to help seal the glue. Be careful since the bottle is made of glass!
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vanishingghosts2

Materials Needed:

  • Biodegradable Packing Peanuts
  • Black Permanent Marker
  • Small Bowl
  • Water

Directions:

  1. Use a black permanent marker to draw a ghost face on each packing peanut. Remember, they MUST be biodegradable packing peanuts. (That means they are made of starch, not polystyrene.)
  2. Fill a small bowl with room temperature water.
  3. Place one ghost on top of the water and watch what happens.

You will start to see small bubbles appearing on the sides of the packing peanut ghost. And then the ghost will disappear right before your eyes! Your results may depend on the type of Biodegradable Packing Peanuts you use. (about 5 – 10 min.)
If the melting packing peanuts are taking too long to disappear, try using hot water to help speed up the process.

 

Why Do Biodegradable Packing Peanuts Melt?
These new packing peanuts are made out of biodegradable corn starch, which means they break down easily instead of just sitting in the garbage dump for years and years like the older style ones. The water helps break them down even faster whether water temperature will affect the speed they dissolve.

  • How fast do the ghosts dissolve in different temperatures of water? Get a stopwatch and time it.
  • Make a chart to record your results.
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cerealism

TAKE AND MAKES for this homeschool project (Ages 7 Up) will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, Oct. 22, 2021.
Watch the Cerealism: Out-of-the-Box-Art video tutorial on YouTube: https://youtu.be/kHjyAqjtMUst

Supplies Included in Take and Make and Needed from Home

In Take and Make:

  • Cereal box or other consumer brand box (if your Take and Make does not include one, you can use one from home)
  • Book jacket / scrapbooking paper
  • Examples of Cerealism Collage sheet

From Home:

  • Scissors
  • Clear Elmer’s glue

Directions: You can find all the instructions with explanatory photos in the video and pdf link below.

Step 1: Prepare Your Box

  1. Open your cereal (or other consumer brand) box at both ends.
  2. Open the cereal box along the glued side seam so that it lays flat.
  3. Cut the front cover away from the back, along the side panel connected to the back.
  4. Cut off all top and bottom flaps. *Save the flaps
  5. Cut away the side panel from the front cover.
  6. Cut away the narrow strip from the outside of the back cover.

The front box cover will be your collage material. The back cover with side panel will serve as the foundation/background for gluing your collage to.

Step 2: Decide How You Will Cut Your Front Cover into Collage Pieces
Choose one of these four ways to cut your box cover (but wait until Step 4 to cut).

  1. Cut down the long side of your box front, making strips about ¼ inch wide. Cut each strip into 3 to 5 pieces. Arrange them “boardwalk” style, placing the pieces out of order.
  2. OR cut your box front horizontally, into 4 thick strips. Cut each strip into 3 squares. Cut each square into smaller squares and rectangles.
  3. OR cut your box front in half horizontally. Cut each half into 4 squares. Cut each square into random angles (e.g., triangles and trapezoids).
  4. OR you can combine all cutting techniques … strips, squares and rectangles, and random angles. (*WARNING: This choice is very challenging to collage!)

Step 3: Decide How You Will Sign Your Artwork (just like Michael Albert, Cerealism Artist)
Three ways to find/make your initials for “signing” your collage:

  1. Using the flaps from your box, look for the first letter of both your first and last name. If you find letters that are the size and style you like, cut around them in a square or rectangle and save them to add to your collage later.
  2. OR make your initials in block letters on the back of one of the box flaps and cut out around the shape of the letters. When you turn them over, they’ll look just like the cereal box and will be very tricky to find in your collage.
  3. OR you can search for your initials on the book jacket in your Take and Make, cut out around them in a square or rectangle, and place them in your collage later on.

Step 4: Create Your Cerealism Masterpiece
*TIP: Work from bottom to top OR top to bottom.

  1. It helps to cut about an inch wide strip off the top of your box front.
  2. Next, cut your box into sections using one of the cutting techniques above (Step 2).
  3. Each time you cut up a smaller section, practice arranging the pieces on your background. NO GLUE YET!
  4. As you arrange, decide on how much space you’ll leave between pieces.
  5. Cut larger pieces into smaller pieces when you need to. You’ll need all sizes to fit your spaces. You can also cut small pieces from your leftover box flaps and panels.
  6. When you’re ready to glue a section down, do it one piece at a time. Place a small dot of glue on the back of your piece, smooth it over the back surface, place your piece, and press firmly.
  7. When you have glued the first section down, continue to cut, arrange and glue one section at a time.
  8. Remember to add your initials into your collage somewhere in a bottom section!
  9. When your collage is complete, you can frame it by cutting the book jacket and/or the decorative paper into mosaic-like pieces, gluing them down to make an interesting border OR … you can just trim the background to fit the finished collage!
  10. Challenge your masterpiece admirers to find your “signature”!
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leaf sprites

Take and Makes for this Make project will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, Oct. 15, 2021.

Supplies and Directions:

Step 1.
Gather your supplies.
Provided in your bag: cardstock leaves to color and cut out, pipe cleaners
From home: colored pencils/crayons/markers, scissors, tape or glue
Step 2.
Color in your leaves (or find some real leaves outside!). Try mixing colors to get your perfect fall leaf. Using a marker or pen, draw faces on your leaves.
Step 3.
Cut out each leaf carefully (you might need a grownup’s help with this).
Step 4.
For each leaf: cut a pipe cleaner in half. Tape or glue both halves to the back for the arms and legs. Bend them however you like to make your leaf unique!
Step 5.
Have fun with your little leaf sprite friends!

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static electricity ghosts

Take and Makes for this project are available starting today, Oct. 8, 2021, at area PPLD libraries.

Supplies and Directions:

Materials Provided: White Tissue Paper, Balloon
Materials you Provide: Scissors, Head of Hair, Marker, Spooky Music (optional), tape (optional)

Directions:
Cut several ghosts out of your tissue paper. Each ghost should be about 1.5 inches long. Draw eyes on each ghost with your marker.
Place your ghosts on a flat surface.
Blow up your balloon and tie the end. Rub it through your hair really fast for about 10 seconds to add a static charge.
Move the balloon near your ghosts. They should begin to rise toward the balloon. See if you can get them to rise, move, and dance around. You should be able to get the ghost to move from several inches away.
If you want the ghost to rise without sticking to the balloon, try taping just the tip to your surface.

The Science behind it:
As you rub the balloon through your hair, you are building up negatively charged electrons on the surface of the balloon. They are then able to pull light positively charged items toward them.

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papelpicado

Take and Makes for this project for ages 9-12 will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, Oct 1, 2021.

 

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month by making papel picado, “punched” or “perforated” paper. This traditional folk art is often made by drawing an intricate design and using a chisel to cut several layers of tissue paper. Because this art form is created using materials that disintegrate in the elements, not many historical pieces remain. Often elaborate, these festive banners are used at many celebrations in Mexico and areas with Hispanic roots and heritage. Use scissors to cut out your own version of this traditional art form.

Supplies and Directions:

Tissue paper, scissors, template (find online or draw), tape (washi or masking)

  1. Find or draw a symmetrical design to use as a template. Check out one of the links below for ideas. Fold the template in half.
  2. Stack two to three pieces of tissue paper in a pile and fold it in half.
  3. Slip the tissue paper inside the folded template so the folded edges are on one side.
  4. Cut out the outside of the template, cutting through the tissue paper inside.
  5. Cut out the inside shapes in the template, folding the template around to gain better access to the different shapes to cut out.
  6. Once the template is entirely cut out, remove the tissue paper pieces and unfold them.
  7. Repeat steps 1-6 with more templates and tissue paper.
  8. Using a long, flat surface, such as a table, unroll a long strip of washi or masking tape, leaving it attached to the roll.
  9. Starting at the end, attach the top of each papel picado (tissue paper design) to the washi or masking tape. Unroll more tape as needed, tearing it off the roll once all papel picado have been attached to the banner.
  10. Fold over any tape hanging over across the top of the banner.
  11. Hang your banner up and enjoy!

Adapted from https://happythought.co.uk/how-to-make-papel-picado/

 

More information about papel picado can be found at https://www.internationalfolkart.org/learn/lesson-plans/papel-picado-(d…

 

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DINOvember 2021

Celebrate dinosaurs this DINOvember with PPLD! Check out a Dinosaur Storytime and be on the lookout for dinosaurs in your Library! Find the dinosaur at your Library and go to the desk for a prize!


DINO Programs

Dinosaur Resource Center

Celebrate DINOvember with Pikes Peak Library District by attending the Dinosaur Resource Center program for kids ages 3 - 12! Come and learn about these amazing creatures that roamed the earth thousands of years ago.

 

Take and Make Dinorama

Make a habitat for a tiny dinosaur and decorate it with all kinds of fun supplies! Name your little dino and make sure to read it your favorite stories! For ages 5 - 12, while supplies last.

 

Virtual Puppet Show: Dinosaurs!

  • When: Mon., Nov. 1 - Thu., Dec. 30
  • Where: Virtual

ROAR! Do you want to be a dinosaur? Go back in time and discover the pre-historic steps of the gentle giants, primeval predators and leaping lizards that once stalked the earth. Fascinating dino-facts are revealed as erupting volcanoes, catchy tunes, and life-like puppets make this colossal creation come to life! Presented by the Center for Puppetry Arts. Duration 45 min.


DINOsources

Explore the world of making this October with All Pikes Peak Makes! A maker is someone who creates – to be innovative, to solve problems, to bring something beautiful into the world, or simply to have fun. They have an idea and they bring it to life. Making can encompass just about anything, from high tech to low tech to no tech, from art to fabrication to artistic fabrication, from needles to table saws to software. Join us Mon., Oct. 11 - Sun., Oct. 24 as we celebrate making in the Pikes Peak region – by exploring outer space as well as local maker hubs, tinkering, thinking, and, of course, making!

Celebrate making with us!


Events

All Pikes Peak Makes @ Knights of Columbus Hall Are you ready to get hands-on with some creative projects? Looking to learn more about creative organizations and resources in our community? Join us for APPM @ KCH!

This year, due to pandemic safety measures, we'll be getting together for a smaller All Pikes Peak Makes event at the newly opened Knights of Columbus Hall. Local creative organizations will bring hands-on projects for the whole family to enjoy. Explore the world of making this October with All Pikes Peak Makes!
MESO – Mobile Earth and Space Observatory The MESO bus is coming to PPLD for All Pikes Peak Makes! MESO is a “science center on wheels" with hands-on educational and research activities focused on earth and space sciences, renewable energy, and scientific instrumentation.

Participants explore the process of science, and in-depth scientific concepts. Scientists-educators engage people directly with scientific tools such as solar and celestial telescopes, spectroscopy, infrared cameras, augmented reality sand table, gravity wells, and much more!

Community Makerspace Tours

  • Monumental Impact You know the library offers makerspaces, but did you know there are other great makerspaces in our community as well? Join us for a tour of Monumental Impact, a space designed to help high school students with programs in technology, engineering, and entrepreneurship. Interested in robots? This is the tour for you!

    Drop in at any time during these hours, but the first 20 attendees of this tour will receive an exclusive APPM tote bag with ideas about how to make it your own!

  • Manitou Art Center You know the library offers makerspaces, but did you know that we have an amazing new relationship with the Manitou Art Center as well? The Manitou Library is now co-located with the MAC and PPLD cardholders have access to their incredible facilities. Join us for a tour of the Manitou Art Center, which to provides an environment in which artists, tinkerers and collaborators can flourish. Interested in woodworking, metalworking, textiles, or ceramics? The MAC has equipment and space for all of these and much more - this makerspace tour is for you!

    While you’re visiting, be sure to check out the MESO bus in the parking lot! Learn more. Drop in at any time during these hours, but the first 20 attendees of this tour will receive an exclusive APPM tote bag with ideas about how to make it your own!

  • Visit a PPLD Makerspace Visit a PPLD Makerspace between Mon., Oct. 11 and Sun., Oct. 24 and receive an exclusive APPM tote bag with ideas on how to make it your own.
  • Take and Make: Solar Bug Make your own solar powered insect that moves around and makes noise! Cut out your bug, decorate it to the nines, and then make a simple circuit using conductive tape, a solar cell, and a motor. Take and Makes will be available beginning on Mon., Oct. 11 at locations TBD. Available while supplies last.


These events are in partnership with Cool Science.

Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated from Tue., Sept. 15 - Thu., Oct. 15, recognizing the contributions and influence of Hispanic American to the history, culture, and achievements of the United States. PPLD hosts several opportunities to learn and celebrate.


Hispanic Heritage Celebration

Visit community booths, enjoy children’s activities, get a library card, watch dancers from Ballet Folklorico de Barajas and Danzas Folkloricas Panamericans, have a tasty a snack provided by local food trucks, and listen to a Spanish language storytime. Painted Pottery Take and Make Available Fri., Sept. 17 at all locations while supplies last. Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with a fun painted pottery craft. We will provide the terra cotta pot, paint, and pattern and seeds to grow a plant. Tween Twist Take and Make Available Fri., Oct. 1 at all locations while supplies last. Hone your scissors skills by creating Papel picado, small banners made by cutting designs into crepe or tissue paper. For ages 9 - 12.


Resources

September highlights suicide prevention. The booklist link below has good resources for parents and children.
See also: https://nationaltoday.com/world-suicide-prevention-day/

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, Sept. 3, 2021.

Supplies and Directions:

Materials we provide: Plastic cup, plastic sandwich bag, rubber band

Materials you provide: scissors, water, interesting specimens to observe

Directions (see pdf link below for additional step-by-step photos):

  1. Cut a hole in the side of the cup along the bottom. This doesn’t need to be neat. It’s designed as an access point for you to get specimens into the bottom of your cup.
  2. Stretch one layer of the plastic bag over the top of the cup and secure it with a rubber band.
  3. Find a specimen and put it in your cup through the hole. (A specimen is an insect, leaf, flower, etc.)
  4. Pour a small amount of water onto the plastic wrap. You want it to be a small pool.
  5. Look through the water at your specimen. The water has created a lens and magnifies your specimen.
  6. Repeat with other specimens.

How it works: A microscope uses mirrors and lenses to bend light so that an image appears larger than it is. In our microscope, the water creates a convex lens. It bends the light that passes through it and makes the specimen appear to be bigger.

 

Supplies:

  • TP tube
  • Mylar sheet
  • Straw
  • Cardstock circle
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Tape
  • Markers or other things to decorate

Directions:

  1. If you'd like, decorate your tp tube.
  2. Cut the mylar sheet into 3 equal pieces that fit to make a triangle inside the tube without falling out. Cut them a little bigger to start first. We cut ours 10 cm x 3.6 cm (3.94 inches x 1.42 inches).
  3. Line up the mylar strips with a tiny strip between them. Tape them together. Then tape them together into a triangle. The shiny side is toward the center. Slide the triangle into the tube.
  4. Cut the straw so the bendy end is about 6 inches long. Tape it to the tp tube so the bendy part hangs over the end.
  5. Cut out your cardstock circle. Poke a hole in the center. Decorate the circle using markers, stickers or anything else you have at home.
  6. Place the straw through the hole in the circle. Slide it until the circle is over the bendy part of the straw so it turns easily.

Look into your kaleidoscope and manually turn the circle. You should see lots of changing designs!

kaleidoscope 1kaleidoscope 2kaleidoscope 3kaleidoscope 4

kaleidoscope 5kaleidoscope 6kaleidoscope 7

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, August 20, 2021. Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/bShFYRZCMW4?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFenhH3jVzKk-QmaHXdAFOBq

Supplies and directions:

Provided in your bag: rocket template, straw, and pipette
From home: markers, scissors, and tape

Step 1
Color your rocket and cut it out.

Step 2
Trim your pipette with scissors so that it fits on the back of your rocket; tape in place with the
opening pointing down.

Step 3
Trim your straw to whatever size you want, put it in your pipette, and you're ready to launch!
Give your straw a big puff of air and watch your rocket fly!