What's New!

KidsMAKE: Clothespin Butterflies

Take and Makes for this project for ages 5-12, will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, April 23, 2021.

Supplies and Directions:

Step 1.
Gather your supplies.
Provided in your bag: clothespin, coffee filter, pipe cleaner
From home: you will need glue, scissors, washable markers, other coloring materials (optional), water (a spray bottle makes this easier), and something to lay your butterfly on while it dries.

Step 2.
Decorate your coffee filter with colorful designs using washable markers. Once complete, place the coffee filter on a cookie sheet or plastic bag to protect your work surface. Mist the coffee filter with the spray bottle filled with water. Watch the colors blend! Set aside to dry.

Step 3.
Decorate clothespin with markers or other coloring materials. Make any design! Set aside to dry.

Step 4.
Once the coffee filter is dry, fold it in half. Take your scissors, cut the filter into a football shape starting at the crease and cut out to the edge (you may need a grownup’s help with this). Unfold coffee filter. Cut-outs should be on the sides of the filter when lying flat on your work surface. Pinch the top and bottom of the filter to meet in the center. Open the clothespin and place the coffee filter inside.

Step 5.
Curl your pipe cleaner into antennas and put inside the clothespin. Use glue to secure it all. Take your completed butterfly and enjoy it outside, in your room, and share it with your friends!

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Discovery Kits

Discovery Kits are a collection of interactive items that patrons can check out to explore new topics, hobbies, and interests at home. There are Discovery Kits for all ages, from toddlers to adults. Learn more about the different kits here.

They are currently available at:


Kits:

  • Round Looms
  • Electronic Playground
  • Lego Mindstorms EV3
  • Bee Bots
  • Survive the Quake Engineering Kit
  • Remote Control Gear Bot
  • Ultimate Fort Builder
  • Cubelets Discovery Set
  • Code & Go Robot Mouse Activity Set
  • MAGNA-TILES Building Set
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STEM: Balancing Buddy

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning this Friday, April 16, 2021.

The video instructions are available at: https://tinyurl.com/PPLDVirtualSTEM

Supplies and Directions:

Materials included: Cork, two 12 inch bamboo skewers, toothpick, modeling clay, googly eyes
Materials needed: glue, paint or markers (optional)

  1. Push the pointy end of a skewer into one side of the cork at a 45 degree angle; repeat on the other side just opposite the first skewer.
  2. Push the toothpick in the center of the bottom of the cork. (*The skewers should be pointing down.)
  3. Roll two equal-sized balls of clay and press them onto the bottom ends of the skewers.
  4. Glue the two googly eyes on the cork. You’ll need to allow time for glue to dry. If you want, you can use paint or a marker to add more details to the face.
  5. Place the tip of the toothpick on your finger and see if it balances. If it leans too much to one side, adjust the angle of the skewers one at a time until the cork stands upright when balanced on the tip of your finger.

Now, have some fun! See if you can gently spin your Balancing Buddy on the tip of your finger. Try walking around the house while keeping the Balancing Buddy in place. Can you balance Balancing Buddy on your elbow? Your knee? What other experiments can you do with your Balancing Buddy?

balancing buddybalancing buddy

The science behind the project:

Everything has a center of gravity, which is the point at which its mass is evenly distributed. The clay balls are heavier than the cork, so they bring the center of gravity to the bottom of the toothpick. That’s why the bottom of the toothpick will balance on your fingertip!

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Tween Twist: Origami Fun

Take and Makes for origami fun, for ages 9-12, will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, April 9, 2021.

Supplies:

Take and Makes will supply assorted Origami paper
Optional supplies needed needed from home: Scissors and a pen, pencil, or marker

Directions:

Star Wars X-wing Starfighter
Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/GyOw1JMO4hI and see pdf below for pictures.

  1. Fold Paper in half.
  2. Fold paper in half again to create a small square.
  3. Fold the square into a triangle.
  4. Unfold paper completely. Fold sides into each other to create a large triangle. You may want to watch the video for this step.
  5. Fold bottom corner of top side down to the crease. Repeat on the other side.
  6. Flip paper over and follow step 5.
  7. Fold bottom corner of one side up so that it creates a new triangle with a flat side on top. Repeat on other side. Flip paper and repeat.
  8. Fold the bottom edge to top of new triangle edge. Repeat on 3 other sides. This will complete the wings.
  9. Fold wing tips down to create guns on the wings.
  10. Enjoy your finished X-wing fighter!

See directions below for a cool Tortoise project also!

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Early Literacy: Tissue Paper "Stained Glass"

Take and Makes for this project, for ages 2-5, are available starting April 2, 2021 at area PPLD libraries.

Brighten up a wintry day with a tissue paper "stained glass" decoration. Hold your finished project up to a window or a light and let the colors shine through! For ages 2-5.

Supplies:

Included in kit:

  • 2 pieces wax paper
  • 4 strips construction paper (for frame)
  • 2 pieces of tissue paper

Supplies you provide:

  • Glue stick or tape
  • Child-safe scissors, Optional

Directions:

  1. Cut or tear the tissue paper into smaller pieces.
  2. Glue tissue paper to one of the pieces of wax paper until the wax paper is filled, or the design is complete. Don’t worry about the tissue paper being over the edge. It will be trimmed later. NOTE: It is easier to spread the glue on the wax paper and then lay the tissue paper on the glue.
  3. Take the 4 strips of construction paper and glue them to the edges to create a frame.
  4. Trim the frame.
  5. Glue the 2nd piece of wax paper onto the tissue paper and frame.
  6. Find a window to display your “stained glass"!

Your child can use child-safe scissors to cut the tissue paper. However, when a child tears pieces of paper, they improve hand strength in the small muscles in their hands. These small muscles are important in many fine motor skills – coloring, handwriting, buttoning buttons, building puzzles, and more! Tearing paper also improves hand-eye coordination and the ability of hands to work together. Both skills are needed to write and to use scissors.

What other works of art can you and your child create with torn paper?

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Homeschool: Bean Germination Experiment

Take and Makes for this homeschool experiment for ages 6-12, will be available at area PPLD libraries starting this Friday, April 2, 2021.

Introduction:

How do seeds transform into plants? What happens when a bean seed begins to grow? Watching a sprout emerge from a dry seed is nothing short of miraculous. You will plant beans inside a plastic bag to watch roots form and leaves emerge right before your very eyes. You will also compare how beans grow in light and dark environments.

Supplies Included in Take and Make Kits:

  • 2 plastic zipper storage bags
  • 10 uncooked pinto beans (remove from bag)
  • 2 paper towels
  • Data Sheet for Light Experiment
  • Data Sheet for Dark Experiment
  • Bean House Template

Supplies from home:

  • Water (in bowl or sprayer)
  • Scissors
  • Scrap paper to label beans with date
  • Scotch tape or glue stick
  • Pen or Pencil
  • Crayons or marker
  • Ruler

Safety Tip: Dried beans are chocking hazards for small children. Adults will need to supervise this activity.

For This Experiment:

  1. Experiment Light: choose a sunny window where the seeds will get plenty of light, but won’t be blasted by intense sun all day.
  2. Experiment Dark: Find a closed drawer or closet that is dark and not opened very often.

Directions:

  1. Fold paper towels so they will fit inside the bags.
  2. Dampen paper towels with spray bottle (not too wet!) and place inside bags. You will need to add water to paper towels when they dry out over time.
  3. Put 5 beans into each bag on top of paper towels (leave room between them to grow!) and zip closed.
  4. Write the date on scrap paper, label either Light or Dark, and tape to each bag.
  5. Color/decorate the frame of the Bean House Template with markers or crayons. Fold it in half lengthwise and use scissors to cut along the dotted lines (you are cutting out a large square). Tape the Light Bean Bag into the Bean House.
  6. Tape the Bean House (Light Bean Bag) to a window. Put Dark Bean Bag into a dark place.

Now you are ready to prepare your data sheets. Use the Scientific Method questionnaire on the back of each sheet to make predictions about how each bag of seeds will grow. Use the front sides of the sheets to collect data. You will make drawings and take measurements. Do this every 3- 5 days and see if your hypothesis for each bean bag comes true! Do the seeds grow the same in both bags? Can you think of other variables to try besides light and dark?

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Kids at Home Art Show!

The annual Homeschool Art Show will once again take place in a digital format. But again, ALL students in grades K - 12 across the Pikes Peak Library District are invited to participate, whether they are doing in-person learning, a hybrid model, or are learning at home. All types of art--paintings, sketches, sculptures, photographs, fiber works—will be accepted for this non-competitive event. Please take a photo of the artwork and submit along with the title of the work, artist’s first name, and age. Submissions will be accepted from April 1 - 15, 2021 (one entry per person please).

Upload your artwork at https://ppld.librariesshare.com/ppldhomeartshow

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KidsMake: Truffula Tree Pencil

Take and Makes for this project for ages 5-12, will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, March 26, 2021.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/nNIaTK7sFgA?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

Supplies and Directions:

Step 1

  • Gather your supplies
  • Provided in your bag: a bendy pencil, feathers, and a Mad Lib
  • From home: you will need glue (preferably a liquid glue like Elmer's) and a pencil sharpener

Step 2

  • Glue your feathers to the erasure side of the pencil

Step 3

  • Add a little pressure to the feathers around the pencil. This will help keep them in place.

Step 4

  • Wait for the glue to dry

Step 5

  • Use your Truffula Tree pencil to create a silly story using the Mad Lib! Try not to read the story until you've filled out all the blank spaces. You might need help from a grownup with this.
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SPRING BREAK Take and Make Activities

PPLD's Family & Children's Services presents Spring Break programming! Take and Makes for Spring Break activities (for ages 2-12) will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, March 19, 2021.

Supplies:

  • 1 ball
  • 1 piece sidewalk chalk
  • 1 bottle bubbles and wand
  • 1 yo-yo (Age 5+)

Activities:

PPLD presents Spring Break: Yo-Yo Lessons from an Expert- Luke Renner https://youtu.be/tTN818dpyD8?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFcFDhKGVTI5KnQchNqAEbSR
These activities support physical exercise, gross motor skill development, brain development, and hand/eye coordination.

Ball Activities - Can you roll the ball back & forth with a friend? How about play catch? Can you throw it in the air and catch it? Try to toss it into a container, getting farther away with each throw. Build a contraption to roll your ball down. More ball activities can be found here: https://frugalfun4boys.com/indoor-ball-games-kids/

Bubble Activities - Blow bubbles! Blow big ones and little ones. Blow double and triple bubbles. Try to catch them on your bubble wand. Can you catch them with other things or even on your body? Can you pop them before they land? Turn on some music and have a bubble dance! Here are some ideas for toddlers: https://www.redtedart.com/bubble-activities-for-toddlers/

Chalk Activities - Go outside to draw with your chalk! Create an obstacle course. Play hopscotch. Draw a picture. Have someone trace your body to make a self-portrait. Write encouraging things for people walking by. Instruct passers-by to do silly things. Play Tic-Tac-Toe. Create a target and see if you can hit it with your ball. Here are some more activities: https://www.thebestideasforkids.com/sidewalk-chalk-ideas/

Yo-Yo Activity – For Age 5+ –Take a beginner yo-yo lesson with yo-yo champion Luke Renner. Click here for more information. He will teach you the basics of how to use the yo-yo and a few tricks. Be careful with your yo-yo, it can be dangerous for younger children. You can find the video here too!

If you are already an expert check out his website for more cool tricks: http://www.lukerenneryoyomagic.com/tricks.html


The possibilities are endless with these simple supplies. See how creative you can be!

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Every March, Women's History Month is celebrated. Here's is a children's booklist of great books at PPLD. Click on the pdf link below.

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KidsSTEM: Color Wheel Spinner

Take and Makes for this project will be available starting this Friday, March 12, 2021.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/8avBll-4qnc?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

Supplies:

Materials included in kit: circle template, cardboard, piece of string about 36”

Materials needed from home: crayons, colored pencils or markers, scissors, glue stick, sharp pen or pencil (to poke holes)

Directions:

  1. Take template of color wheel or print out a copy below.
  2. Color in the sections red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple. For an accurate color wheel, red should be opposite green, yellow opposite purple, and blue opposite orange.
  3. Cut out your circle template.
  4. Glue your circle to the piece of cardboard and cut it out again.
  5. Carefully poke two holes in the center of the color wheel, side by side.
  6. Thread your string through both holes, then tie the ends in a knot.
  7. Hold each end of the string. The cardboard circle should be about midway between the ends. Wind the string by spinning the wheel in a motion similar to a twirling a jump rope.
  8. Gently pull the string tight to get the wheel spinning. If you continue moving your hands in an in and out motion, the circle should continue to spin.

Explanation:

As the wheel spins, what do you notice about the colors? The colors disappear!

As the wheel is spinning fast, your eyes blend the colors together and the color wheel looks white.

White light, like sunlight, is made of all the colors in the rainbow. When light hits a colored object, most of it is absorbed and only one color is reflected. A red object, for example, absorbs almost the full spectrum of light, reflecting red only. When the color wheel was spinning fast enough, the colors changed faster than your eyes could see the individual colors and send the signals to your brain, so the reflections of all of the colors blended together and you saw white light!

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Kids at Home Art Show

The annual Homeschool Art Show will once again take place digitally! UPDATE: Submission deadline has been extended to Fri., April 30.



All students in grades K-12 across the Pikes Peak Library District are invited to participate, whether they are doing in-person learning, a hybrid model, or are learning at home.


All types of art from paintings, sketches, sculptures, photographs, to fiber works and more will be accepted for this non-competitive event. Please take a photo of the artwork and submit along with the title of the work, artist’s first name, and age.

Learn more HERE.

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Tween Twist: Finger Knitting

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/xJ0lqs_BoLg?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

Supplies:

  • Yarn
  • Your fingers

Directions:

  1. Take the end of the yarn and loop it around the pointer finger of your non-dominant hand (if you are right-handed, tie the knot around the pointer finger of your left hand; if you are left-handed, tie the knot around the pointer finger of your right hand). Optional: Tie a knot to keep the yarn loop in place.
  2. On the same hand with the knot, weave the yarn around your fingers. Go behind your middle finger, in front of your ring finger, around your pinky, behind your ring finger, in front of your middle finger, and behind your pointer finger.
  3. Repeat the weaving pattern so that you have two loops of yarn around each finger.
  4. You want the loops of yarn around your fingers to be loose enough to slide off your fingers but tight enough that they don’t fall off accidentally. Use your thumb to hold the loose end of the yarn tight.
  5. Take the bottom loop of yarn on your pinky finger and pull it over the top loop of yarn and off your finger. You should have only one loop of yarn on your pinky finger.
  6. Repeat for each of your fingers. Pull the bottom loop of yarn over the top loop and off your fingers.
  7. Push the remaining loop of yarn on each finger down toward the base of your fingers. They are now the bottom loops of yarn.
  8. Repeat steps 3-8 until you’re ready to be done with your finger knitting.
  9. To cast off (or end your project), cut the yarn so you have about three inches left. Thread the end of the yarn through the loop of yarn on each finger, starting with the pointer finger and ending with the pinky.
  10. Pull each loop of yarn off your fingers and pull the loose end tight. Tie the end of the yarn in a knot around one of the loops of yarn to fasten. Cut off the extra “tail” of yarn.
  11. If you would like to take a break while working on your knitting, use a long, rounded object (a pen, pencil, chop stick, or knitting needle). Slide the loops of yarn off your fingers and onto object and put in a safe place until you’re ready to start finger knitting again.

To restart your project, slide the loops of yarn back onto your fingers. Remember that the loose end of thread will be on your pointer finger and that the knitting will lay against the back of your hand. Repeat steps 3-8 to continue knitting.

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Vote for Your Favorite Children's Book!

What is your favorite children’s book for children 12 and under? PICK ONE picture book, beginning reader book, chapter book, or children’s non-fiction book!

Anyone may vote but please vote only once. Teachers may return this form with your students' favorite titles but please be sure to indicate how many students are voting for which title. Adult fiction or non-fiction will be excluded. A PPLD reading list of the most popular children's' book titles will be available right here in May, 2021.

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Homeschool Take and Make: Hurricane Building Challenge

Watch this homeschool project at: https://youtu.be/Hes9P7sXTD4?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFcQoPQnZvsy70uOGw-GdBLE

Supplies:

  • 2 half sheets of cardstock; 4 craft sticks
  • 1 gable roof template- see below
  • 1 hip roof template sheet of aluminum foil
  • 1 “plate of fortune cookies” (photo on cardstock)
  • Glue
  • Scotch tape
  • Packing tape
  • Shallow jar lid
  • Sheet for foundation (cardboard, foamboard, or cardstock)
  • Flat bake sheet (optional)
  • Leaf blower, electric fan, or hair dryer
  • squirt bottle or watering can with sprinkle spout
  • Baking rack (or similar object)
  • Plastic dishpan tub (optional)

Directions:

See detailed directions and templates in the pdf links below!

Photo by Jo Kassis from Pexels

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Early Literacy Take and Make: Paper Strip Collage

Have fun tearing or cutting strips of paper and creating a collage. A collage is a work of art made by gluing pieces of different materials or different size materials to a flat surface.

For this project, your child will glue strips of construction paper to the white paper to create a unique work of art. You'll need a piece of white paper and a few colors of construction paper plus glue.

Directions:

  1. To begin, have your child use child-safe scissors to cut the construction paper into strips or different size pieces. Your child can tear the paper if you do not have child-safe scissors.
  2. Let your child glue or tape the construction paper onto the white paper however they want to create their collage.

Early Literacy Tip:

This project helps young children develop the fine motor skills they need to hold pencils and crayons. Having strong motor skills will help children as they begin the process of learning how to write. How can cutting or tearing paper develop this skill? As children tear or cut the paper, they are building the small muscles in their palm and hand. They are also enhancing their eye-hand coordination. They must be able to see what they are tearing or cutting while moving their hand. Learning how to use scissors plays an important role in developing fine motor skills. Here are some tips for teaching your child how to use child-safe scissors:

  • To help your child remember how to hold a pair of scissors, draw a smiley face on the thumbnail of your child’s cutting hand. The smiley face reminds them to keep their thumb up when cutting.
  • Cutting paper can be tricky; practice cutting playdough first.
  • Cardstock is easier to cut than paper. Let your child cut old greeting cards or old playing cards.
  • Provide activities that use tools such as tongs, hole punches, tweezers, eyedroppers, and clothespins to strengthen fine motor skills necessary for cutting.
  • It might sound easy, but teaching young children how to cut with scissors is a very complex task. Try using this rhyme to help your child remember how to hold and use scissors properly:
  • Two fingers on the bottom
    and the thumb on top.
    Open the mouth and go
    chop, chop, chop.

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KidsMake: Winter Wands

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/C1oVgbWPcIQ?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

Supplies:

  • Paper star
  • Large craft stick
  • White paper to cut out a snowflake
  • Silver sequins
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Markers
  • Tape
  • Other decorative bling

Directions:

  1. Glue your craft stick to the back of your star so it looks like a wand. Add a piece of tape to keep it extra secure.
  2. Using the white paper, cut out your own snowflake to glue onto your star (you might need to cut your paper into a square first and you might need a grown up’s help with this).
  3. Decorate the craft stick with markers and add sequins and any other decorations to your wand that you would like.
  4. Make some wintery magic.
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PPLD Challenge: Library Lovers Month

Enter your creations in our PPLD Challenges! Randomly selected entries will be featured on PPLD’s websites and social media accounts and one randomly drawn entry will receive a gift certificate and prize pack of curated craft books from the Friends of the Library.

Love Letters to the Library

February is Library Lover's Month! Show us your love by writing us a love letter or note.

Post a photo of your note on Facebook or Instagram any time from Mon., Feb. 15 - 28 and make sure to include the hashtag #ppldchallenge and tag @ppld to be eligible to win. Alternatively, you can send your photo to ppldchallenge@ppld.org and we will post it to social media for you!

Want to post anonymously? Use the webform here.

Rules for participation:

  1. Please participate in good faith.
  2. Keep competitions civil and fun!
  3. PPLD reserves the right to remove inappropriate content, including but not limited to obscene or offensive statements or personal attacks. Learn more about our policies here.
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KidsSTEM: Ice Lanterns

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/1spsamOSMtg?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

Supplies:

  • Plastic cups in 2 sizes
  • Pipe cleaners
  • Pompoms and other doodads or baubles
  • Battery operated candle
  • Tape
  • Water
  • Freezer
  • Paper towel
  • Additional baubles or doodads
  • Weights, like rocks

Directions:

This is an engineering challenge! For more step-by-step pictures of project, open pdf link below.

  1. Twist your pipe cleaners up the inside of the larger cup.
  2. Slide the smaller cup inside with the pipe cleaners in between the large and small cups.
  3. Carefully push pompoms and/or other baubles or doodads between the 2 cups also.
  4. With the tops of the cups even, crisscross two pieces of tape across the top of the cups.
  5. Placing cups on a paper towel, gently fill the larger cup with water until it’s about 1 inch from the top. You do not want water to go into the smaller cup. You may need to add something to weigh down the smaller cup.
  6. Place in the freezer (or outside if it’s cold enough) until it’s frozen solid. This could take about 5 hours.
  7. Observe your creation! You may notice that the smaller cup is higher as is the water/ice level. This is a great illustration of how water expands as it changes states from a liquid to a solid.
  8. Remove from freezer and let sit about 10 mins., carefully remove the smaller cup (and tape). Then remove the larger cup. You may need to cut the cups off.
  9. Turn on the battery operated candle and place it in the center of your lantern. Put your lantern outside to admire!

Based on https://www.steampoweredfamily.com/activities/engineering-ice-lantern-st...

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LENA Start

LENA Start is a 10-week program where parents learn how to increase conversational turns with their babies and toddlers.

Available sessions:

Tuesdays, June 15 - Aug. 17 from 2 - 3 p.m.: Register here!

Thursdays, June 17 - Aug. 17 from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m.: Register here!


LENA device in vestHave you ever wondered how much you talk to your baby/toddler? Would you like to learn ways to increase talk and get your child ready for school?

This 10-week program will help parents, with children 0-32 months, increase conversational turns. Each week a child will wear a "talk pedometer" to track the number of adult words, conversational turns, and minutes of electronics they are exposed to. We will increase conversational turns by the end of the 10 weeks. We will meet weekly to give you tips on how to increase conversational turns and each parent will receive a free book each week! The child will receive a gift at graduation and three gift cards throughout the program!

For more information contact Milissa Fellers, mfellers@ppld.org.

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Tween Twist: Light Up LED Cards

Starting Friday, Feb., 5, 2021, visit your favorite Library location to pick up a Take & Make (materials for the program), while supplies last. For ages 9-12.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/YVNFFC8UttI.

Supplies:

  • Card printed on cardstock
  • Button cell battery
  • LED light
  • Copper tape
  • Colored pencils or markers
  • Tape
  • Thumbtack
  • Pencil, or pen (to poke a hole in the cardstock)

Directions:

  1. Color in the template first
  2. Use a thumb tack, pencil, or pen to poke a hole through the middle of the robot’s heart (for the LED light to go through).
  3. Fold the card in half.
  4. Lay the copper tape along the two paths (polarities) of the circuit, following the diagram. Leave space at the corner where there’s a drawing of the LED light. Reserve some copper tape for step 6.
  5. Add the LED light by inserting the wire legs through the hole on the front of the card and bending the wire legs to reach the circuit path. Match the shorter wire leg with the negative path (the copper tape leading to the circle) and the longer wire leg with the positive path (the copper tape going through the dotted “fold” line. Don’t worry if your LED light placement doesn’t exactly match the drawing on the diagram – as long as the leg wires of your LED light connect with the copper tape, it should work.
  6. Secure the legs of the LED light using small pieces of copper tape.
  7. Add the battery negative side down inside the circle on the template and secure it by taping only the half closest to the LED light down to the card. If your battery is smaller than the circle on the template, center it in the middle of the circle.
  8. Fold the corner of the card over to create a switch to turn the card on and off.
  9. If you want, write a greeting in your card, and give it to someone special.
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KidsMAKE: Rainbow Scratch Art Bookmarks

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning this Friday, Jan. 29, 2021.

Supplies and Directions

Provided in your bag: a bookmark, a stylus, and a ribbon
From home: you will need a book, so you can use your new bookmark!

  1. Think about what you want to draw on your bookmark: your name, a space sky, a flowery garden, stripes, polka dots, anything you like!
  2. Using the stylus, scratch your scene into the bookmark. Keep in mind the hole goes at the top for your ribbon, so make sure you scratch your scene the right way up.
  3. After you're done with the rainbow scratching, tie your ribbon through the hole at the top of the bookmark to give it even more color!
  4. Pick a book and use your colorful bookmark!

Need help choosing a book? Check out our booklists with recommendations for everything from mysteries to humor!

Check out our many KidsMAKE videos at: tinyurl.com/PPLDVirtualKidsMake

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Check out these stats and our top title of 2020 below.


  • Physical material checkouts: 1,845,866
  • Additions to physical collection:18,000 titles and 58,000 items, plus 15,570 magazines
  • OverDrive:
    • Checkouts: 2,430,575
    • Patrons: 61,278 patrons; an increase of 22%
  • Freegal:
    • Song Downloads: 76,007
    • Songs Streamed: 248,986
  • Kanopy: 58,201 videos streamed
  • Hoopla: 40,813 checkouts, movies and television mostly
  • New cardholders during 2020: 26,215

Top 10 Adult Titles


Top 10 Young Adult Titles


Top 10 Children's Titles

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Early Literacy Take and Make: Stickers in a Frame

Create your own work of art using the stickers and frame.

Before your child can learn to write, they must develop the small/fine motor skills which are used to grip a crayon/pencil. Peeling the back off the stickers and placing them in the frame provides your child with the opportunity to develop these skills.
To prepare young children for writing, provide them with opportunities to use their hands and fingers. This will help them later when they hold crayons and pencils.

  • Open and close containers with lids
  • Cut with child-safe scissors
  • Finger paint with paint, shaving cream, yogurt, or pudding
  • Use a paintbrush
  • Play with play dough and clay—roll, smoosh, pat, pound, and use tools like popsicle sticks or stamps
  • Lace Cheerios onto pipe cleaners
  • Lace pipe cleaners into the holds on a colander
  • Draw, scribble, or write with crayons, pencils, and markers
  • Put together puzzles
  • Build with small blocks
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Virtual STEM Favorite: Measuring with Daisy

Supplies:

  • Ruler (12" or 18" or 36") or measuring tape
  • Yarn or string
  • Scissor
  • A stuffed animal or your pet

Directions:

  1. Measure, as best you can, your pet or stuffed animal and determine its length in inches.
  2. After you know how many inches, cut a piece of string or yarn the same length.
  3. Take this piece of string and measure items around your house. How many cats (or hamsters or dogs, etc.) long is your kitchen? Your table? Your bed?

Please leave a comment below, tell us what you used to measure items around your house.

You can watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCU1Ks8mBf0

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