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Old Colorado City Library (OL)

Old Colorado City Library

Address:
2418 West Pikes Peak Ave - map it!
Colorado Springs, CO 80904

Phone: (719) 634-1698
Contact Us

Hours:
Monday - Thursday: 9 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Friday and Saturday: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sunday: Closed
Holiday Hours and Closures

Bus Route: 3

  • Friends of Old Colorado City Library
  • Old Colorado City Library Facebook

Friends of Old Colorado City Library

The Old Colorado City Friends Book Store is open during regular Library hours.

Meetings are on the 3rd Saturday of January, April, July, and October.

Click here to learn more about the Friends of the Pikes Peak Library District.


 

What's New!

Gay Houghtaling

A decade ago, current PPLD Maker in Residence Gay Houghtaling saw an art exhibit made up entirely of suitcases filled with found objects. This exhibit introduced her to the art of assemblage, the art of displaying a collection of objects in a way that expresses a meaning or idea. Gay works with Who Gives a Scrap, a local creative reuse store, to provide craft swaps and classes through the Pikes Peak Library District. Gay has an eclectic teaching background that includes Kindergarten in an overseas classroom, language acquisition and cultural studies for children moving overseas, fourth grade art, and reentry programs for tweens and teens. She currently homeschools her 12 year old grandson.

She will be teaching classes throughout Pikes Peak Library District and hosting open studio hours at Library 21c.

Assemblage Boxes
Join local assemblage artist Gay Houghtaling and learn about the art of assemblage. Use a wide variety of art, craft, and found objects to create your own boxed assemblage inspired by fashion, memory, and your own story.

Studio Hours at Library 21c
Wed., Oct. 24 at 6 - 9 p.m.
Thu., Oct. 25 at 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Sun., Nov. 11 at 2 - 5 p.m.
Thu., Nov. 15 at 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Sat., Nov. 17 at 1 - 4 p.m.

Comments: 0
Call for Makers

The makerspaces and studios in Pikes Peak Library District are great places for generating creativity, innovation, and learning. To foster such endeavors, PPLD has a Maker in Residence program.

What are we looking for?

  • People with creativity and skills to teach and share
  • People who are excited to introduce others to their expertise
  • Techy people
  • Artsy people
  • Musical people
  • People with well-developed ideas for their studio project and classes that are detailed in their proposals and can be accommodated at multiple PPLD locations
  • A wide variety of different proposals from across the making spectrum

We are currently searching for makers and artists who are able to participate any time during 2019.

Program Outline

  • Contracted position for eight (8) weeks.
  • Fifteen (15) hours of studio time, usually at Library 21c held on various days/times throughout the contracted period to cover a wide variety of the library’s open hours. This time will be split into at least four (4) different sessions. A portion of our makerspace will be designated to have the project being worked on by the maker on display.
  • Two (2) programs/classes presented at Library 21c, two (2) programs/classes at East Library, one (1) program/class at Sand Creek Library, one (1) program/class at the Manitou Arts Center, and two (2) programs/classes at other PPLD locations for a grand total of eight (8) classes.
  • All programs/classes will be made available to the general public, with PPLD responsible for participant signup.
    • All program/class times and locations are to be determined by PPLD.
    • These programs/classes must present our patrons with an activity-based, hands-on opportunity to learn a new skill.
    • These programs will be mainly geared toward ages 16 and up.
    • These are not usually eight (8) different class topics, instead usually one (1) or two (2) different classes offered multiple times.
    • Contract payment of $1,100, with up to another $450 reimbursement for supplies for public programs.
    • Contractor will be responsible for procuring all necessary consumable supplies. PPLD will reimburse Contractor for supply costs based on actual detailed receipts. All leftover supplies will become the property of PPLD.
  • Any resulting artwork or product created by the Contractor will become the property of PPLD.
  • Contractor may be asked to coordinate with PPLD in the making of a PPLD produced video that promotes Contractor’s specific class content at PPLD.
  • Contractor is responsible for any travel costs related to the Independent Contractor Agreement activities.

Application Process

  • Complete and submit this application.
  • The call will close on Tuesday, October 23.
  • Interviews will be held for makers who are being considered.
  • If offered a residency, the maker must sign PPLD’s Independent Contractor Agreement, fill out an IRS W9 form, and complete a PPLD paid background check.
Comments: 6

An exploration of folklore and the process of immigration, cultural belonging, and frayed threads of ancestry. Centering on the Celtic cultures, Willson & McKee will weave music, songs and stories into a net to catch the heart of being human in any culture.

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We are in the process of evaluating our Winter Adult Reading Program and we want to hear from you! Please take a few moments to answer our survey by October 28. The Winter Adult Reading Program and all potential activities are geared for patrons ages 18+.

Comments: 1
2019 Profile in Courage Essay Contest

Essay contest for High School students--First place wins $10,000 cash award!

In Profiles in Courage, John F. Kennedy recounted the stories of eight U.S. senators who risked their careers to do what was right for the nation. These leaders demonstrated political courage by taking a stand for the public good in spite of pressure by interest groups, their political party, or even their constituents. The Profile in Courage Essay Contest challenges students to write an original and creative essay that demonstrates an understanding of political courage as described by John F. Kennedy in Profiles in Courage.

The maximum word count is 1,000 with a minimum of 700, not including citations and bibliography. Use at least five varied sources such as government documents, letters, newspaper articles, books, and/or personal interviews.

All submissions must adhere to contest requirements.

The winner receives a $10,000 cash award. The winner and her/his family are invited to the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library in Boston to accept her/his award and participate in Profile in Courage Award events from May 18 - 20, 2019. Travel and lodging expenses will be paid for the trip to Boston for the winning student and her/his parents.

The contest deadline is January 18, 2019.

For more information, visit https://jfklibrary.org/essaycontest

Comments: 0
Arts Month

Pikes Peak Library District is proud to partner with the Cultural Office of the Pikes Peak Region (COPPeR) by providing a wide array of Arts Month programming throughout October.

Arts Month is an annual initiative to raise awareness for the quality, diversity, and value of the arts in our community. Building on the popularity of National Arts & Humanities Month, our local initiative is being orchestrated by COPPeR and is open to participation by all area artists and arts organizations. The official call to action during Arts Month is to “have at least one new cultural experience with family or friends during the month of October.”

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PPLD Board of Trustees

Get to know – and get help from – Pikes Peak Library District’s Board of Trustees

On the evenings of Wed., Oct. 10 and Tue., Oct. 16, members of the PPLD Board of Trustees will be shadowing our library employees at seven different branch locations. Board members will be working everything from circulation to security to helping our patrons! They’ll be available for library related assistance, and be there to answer any questions you may have about PPLD. Make sure to stop by and see our board members at your favorite library branch!

Wed., Oct. 10

Tue., Oct. 16

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Urban peak Supply Drive, Friday Sept. 21-Monday Nov. 8

As part of All Pikes Peak Reads (APPR), Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) is hosting a Supply Drive from Friday, Sept. 21 to Monday, Nov. 5 for Urban Peak Colorado Springs! Urban Peak serves youth experiencing homelessness in Colorado Springs. Visit your local library to drop off supplies!

A list of their needs is below.

Clothing/Hygiene:

  • Ponchos**
  • Raincoats**
  • Tarps**
  • Chapstick**
  • Men’s New Boxer Briefs, Size Medium**

Food:

  • Coffee**
  • Tea**
  • Salsa**
  • Enchilada Sauce**
  • Taco Shells**
  • Ranch Dressing**
  • Ketchup**
  • BBQ Sauce**
  • Hot Sauce**
  • Canned Vegetables**
  • Canned Beans**
  • Canned Fruit**
  • Canned or boxed soup**
  • Velveeta/nonperishable cheese**
  • Olive Oil**
  • Pam Cooking spray**
  • Bulk dry seasoning (chili powder, garlic powder, salt, pepper)**

Household:

  • Shower Curtain and hooks
  • Cleaning supplies
  • Broom/dustpan
  • Laundry detergent
  • Paper towels
  • Dish washing soap
  • Can Openers
  • Backpacks
  • Flash drives

**indicates greatest need

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Matt de la Peña

Matt de la Peña is coming to Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD)!

de la Peña is the author of one of the short stories in our All Pikes Peaks Reads (APPR) title, Flying Lessons and Other Stories, edited by Ellen Oh.

Matt de la Peña is the New York Times Bestselling, Newbery Medal-winning author of six young adult novels (including Mexican WhiteBoy, We Were Here, and The Living) and four picture books (including Love and Last Stop on Market Street). In 2016 he was awarded the NCTE Intellectual Freedom Award. Matt received his MFA in creative writing from San Diego State University and his BA from the University of the Pacific where he attended school on a full basketball scholarship. de la Peña currently lives in Brooklyn NY. He teaches creative writing and visits high schools and colleges throughout the country.

He will be at Library 21c on Thursday, November 8, at 6:30 p.m., with a free presentation that is open to the public.

Don't miss this award winning author!

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Monique Santos

PPLD's Maker in Residence for July/August 2018 was paper crafting instructor Monique Santos, a Colorado native and enjoys all things “Colorado”! A perfect day would be a morning hike with a friend, cup of coffee, afternoon of playing with the girls and dinner with the family. When she is not busy as a wife and stay at home mom of two daughters 6 & 4 she enjoys being a part of the Colorado Springs community. Whether it be at her daughters school, community centers, crafting events or the library she is passionate about sharing her love for creating.

She taught classes throughout Pikes Peak Library District, as well as hosted open studio hours at Library 21c.

Visit PPLD's Maker/Artist in Residence page for more information about this program.

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Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) is pleased to announce the selected titles for All Pikes Peak Reads (APPR) 2018, which will run from September 10 - November 17.

For a complete list of events, click here.

Our selected adult title is The Newcomers: Finding Refuge, Friendship, and Hope in an American Classroom by Helen Thorpe. The book explores themes of diversity, multiculturalism, compassion, immigration, endurance, resiliency, and hope. PPLD will use these themes while planning programs of community interest. Our selections for teens and children titles also explore similar themes. (For a list of book club discussion questions for The Newcomers, click here.)

Our title for teens and young adults is Flying Lessons and Other Stories edited by Ellen Oh. Flying Lessons was published in partnership with We Need Diverse Books.

Our children's title is Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Peña. Last Stop on Market Street was the 2016 Newbery Award winner.

This fall we will present a variety of programs to the community including author visits, film screenings, community discussions and panel presentations, theater productions, art installations and gallery exhibitions, and more. We will be undertaking many of these with our community partners.

We are delighted that our selected authors will be able to join us in the fall. Helen Thorpe will be visiting at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, October 2 at Library 21c. Matt de la Peña (who also wrote a short story included in Flying Lessons and Other Stories) will visit at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, November 8 at Library 21c.

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The Teen Art Contest is for teens and by teens. Teens create the art, and teens determine the winners.

The theme for our 2018 Teen Art Contest was "Hidden Beauty." Teens were encouraged to show us where they have found hidden beauty in the ordinary, everyday world.

All of the artwork will be displayed at either Penrose Library, East Library, or Library 21c during the month of April.

Here are the winners!

Best In Show
Clear by Isabella Huhn

High School - First Place
Letting Go by Celine Hanlon

High School - Second Place
Masked by Elizabeth Ward

Middle School - First Place
Beauty Is in the Eye of the Beholder by Connor Murdock

Middle School - Second Place
Beauty of the Mountain by Adyline Poirson

Coordinator’s Choice - High School
Color through Clutter by Rebecca Gearhart

Coordinator’s Choice - Middle School
A Shoe by Adia Byron

You can view the winners here:
Teen Art Contest 2018 Winners

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A new exhibit of images from Pikes Peak Library District’s Special Collections photograph archive captures the response of many residents of Colorado Springs and the Pikes Peak region to the inauguration of President Donald Trump and his first 100 days in office. The exhibit will be on display at East Library in February, followed by visits to other PPLD locations (see full schedule below).

The response began with the Women’s March held on Saturday, January 21, 2017. The day began with speakers and performance artists in Acacia Park, followed by a march along the streets of Downtown Colorado Springs. Observers estimated the crowd to be in the range of 7,000 participants, which places it among the largest public demonstrations in the history of Colorado Springs.

The collection also includes images from a pro-Trump rally held in Acacia Park, marches and rallies against the Dakota Access and Keystone Pipelines, an anti-Muslim immigration ban protest, a Climate Justice Vigil, and the March for Science.

Numerous groups served as organizers, sponsors, and supporters of these events. Included were SURJ (Showing Up for Racial Justice), the El Paso County Republican Party, UCOS (Unite Colorado Springs), NAACP Colorado Montana Wyoming State Conference, NAACP Colorado Springs Branch 4001, the Colorado Springs Council for Justice, the Pikes Peak Justice & Peace Commission.

The First 100 Days! Exhibition Schedule
February: East Library
March: Fountain Library
April: Rockrimmon Library
May: Old Colorado City Library
August: Monument Library
September: Library 21c
October: Penrose Library
November: Ruth Holley Library
December: Sand Creek Library

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Repair Café Volunteers Needed

PPLD's Repair Café is in need of BIKE fixers! Fill out a volunteer application at ppld.org/repair-cafe or stop by your local library!

Repair Café is a neighborhood initiative that promotes repair as an alternative to tossing things out. At a Repair Café you’ll find the tools and materials needed to repair your broken items, as well as knowledgeable volunteers who will show you how to do it. Repair Trainers will offer a diagnosis and suggested remedy for broken items, repairing items when possible and otherwise explaining what parts you may need to obtain to complete the repair.

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Best Workplaces 2017

At an awards ceremony on Mon., Nov. 27, 2017 at the Antlers hotel, Pikes Peak Library District was named Best Workplace by The Gazette in the Extra Large Company (300+ employees) category.

According to The Gazette, PPLD "ranked high among its employees in social responsibility, providing meaningful work, confidence in leadership, being a place workers would recommend to others for employment and operating with strong values and ethics."

Here is a video The Gazette created, which was shown at the ceremony.

Comments: 4
Charles and Tauni Orndorff

PPLD's Makers in Residence for November/December 2017 were Charles and Tauni Orndorff. The Colorado Springs natives have been making costumes and props for over 15 years. Their skills include sewing, fabrication, 3D design, and much more. They are currently instructors at the Pikes Peak Makerspace where they teach resin casting, silicone molding, and vac-forming.

They taught classes about creating silicone molds throughout the Library District, as well as hosting studio hours at Library 21c.

Visit PPLD's Maker/Artist in Residence page for more information about this program.

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Congratulations to the winners of our first All Pikes Peak Writes, PPLD's adult fiction writing contest. You can read the winning entries by clicking here.

1st Place
"I Don't Blame Him for Dying" bu Andrew Beasley

2nd Place
"Puddle" by Andrea Malcom

3rd Place
"The Photograph" by Jacqueline Peveto

Honorable Mention
"Apostrophe" by Ariane Peveto

Honorable Mention
"Dr. Luckwood" by Jill Long

Comments: 0

The Teen Art Contest is for teens and by teens. Teens create the art, and teens determine the winners.

The theme for our 2017 Teen Art Show & Contest was Transformation Teens were encouraged to show us how art impacts your life, or how it transforms the world around you.

All of the artwork will be displayed at either Penrose Library, East Library, or Library 21c during the month of April. Questions? Contact Becca Phillipsen at (719) 884-9800, x6336 or rphillipsen@ppld.org.

Here are the winners!

Best in Show

"Mirror Reflection" by Aleyah B.

High School

1st Place: "My Fantasy" by Elizabeth W.
2nd Place: "Summer Sunsets" by Kaylee T.
Coordinator’s Choice: "Hands of Time" by Mary R.

Middle School

1st Place: "Transportation through Time" by Liberty H.
2nd Place: "Evolution" by Mikayla R.
Coordinator’s Choice: "Coy Fish Pond" by Kristine B.

You can view the winning works here:

2017 Teen Art Contest Winners

Comments: 1
Check Out Colorado Backpack

Reserve your free State Parks Pass and Backpack today by clicking here!

This program is a partnership with the Colorado Department of Education, State Library, local library systems, and Colorado Parks and Wildlife. It is meant to encourage Coloradans to visit our State Parks and experience all of the great outdoor recreation that this state has to offer.

Each backpack, which checks out for one week, includes:

  • State park pass hang tag for the rear-view mirror
  • Guide to Your 42 State Parks
  • Binoculars
  • Leave No Trace™ card
  • Colorado Wildlife Guide
  • Activity ideas list
  • Colorado Trees and Wildflower Guide
  • Fishing Basics tip sheet
  • Program evaluation card

Click here for more information about this program.

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PPLD now has Sorenson videophones and Video Relay Service-equipped laptops available for patron use. VRS allows people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or speech-impaired to communicate using American Sign Language through video equipment. It replaces TTY or Text Telephone.

Videophones are now available at the East Library and Library 21c.

VRS-equipped laptops are available at the following PPLD locations: Cheyenne Mountain, High Prairie, Manitou Springs, Monument, Old Colorado City, Ruth Holley, and Sand Creek libraries.

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Beginning Jan. 9, 2017, PPLD will no longer charge fines on overdue children and teen items. Removing overdue fines will provide greater opportunity for children and teens to use the full range of library services. Currently, 15% of children and teen cardholders are blocked from checking out items at the library due to overdue fines.

Also, overdue fines on DVDs and games will be reduced from 25 cents per day to 10 cents per day.

PPLD seeks to foster literacy and life-long learning for children and teens. The Library regularly evaluates policies to see what barriers for service exist and evaluates how to eliminate such barriers. The Library’s Board of Trustees approved the new policy at their December meeting.

Items that will not accrue overdue fines must be designated as “juvenile” or “teen” in the Library catalog. The policy will take effect for any items checked out January 9 or after. Lost item and damage fees will still apply.

Overdue notices will still be sent as reminders to return Library items. Items not returned within 21 days of the due date will be considered lost, and the full cost of the item will be charged to the patron’s account.

Click here for more information

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Add Your Book Review to PPLD.orgHave you read a really great (or really bad) book lately? Tell us all about it! Just fill out this book review form and your review will be posted in the Book Reviews section of ppld.org.

Happy reviewing!

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Deb Bartos

PPLD's Artist in Residence for September and October 2016 was Deb Bartos, an oil painter who loves exploring the natural world and teaching students about color. She continues to develop her knowledge about how light and color work together, and is fascinated by the process.

Visit PPLD's Maker/Artist in Residence page for more information about this program.

Comments: 0
It's Back to School Time!

PPLD would like to wish all our students and parents a great school year. Here are some resources we offer to help with your studies:

And of course, you can always chat with a librarian by clicking the "Chat Now!" button, or email us at Ask a Librarian.

Good luck out there!

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Sarah Pottenger, Winner My Westside-Our Voice Essay Contest

Old Colorado City Library is pleased to announce the winners of our essay contest, My Westside--Our Voice. Our generous Friends of the Library supported this programming with a $100 prize for first place. The winner, Sarah Pottenger, is also published in the November 21, 2013 edition of the Westside Pioneer. Enjoy reading her essay along with our runners-up, Andrea Corley and Victor Shepard.

Your Westside is My Westside Now, by Sarah Pottenger - Winner

I’m a third-generation Colorado Springs native, and I’ve never wanted to live anywhere else. I grew up near Academy Boulevard, but some of my best memories are of visits to the Westside, whether to visit my parents’ old haunts, see the house where my grandmother was born, or just to take the car to the mechanic. Driving to the Westside was an event, taking half an hour.

I lived in that same house off Academy for twenty years. Then my family downsized from our house to a duplex just north of Old Colorado City. We moved here in 2010, and though it was a terrible move, we were here. For my parents, returning to the Westside was like coming home. For me, it was a dream come true. Every week one of us remarks that we still can’t believe we get to live here, even after nearly four years.

As a lifelong reader, I love the Old Colorado City Library. We can drive there in just a few minutes, or walk in half an hour. I probably visit three times a week, and it’s the prettiest, friendliest library in town. We’re also just minutes away from Fire Station #5, housing the wonderful firefighters who not only came to our rescue when my bedroom flooded during the September 12 storm, but also arrived within moments when my dad suffered a heart attack right before Christmas last year.

When we were children, my brother and I loved to come to the Westside. The Creamery was (and still is) our favorite ice cream shop. We liked to visit souvenir stores, dipping our hands into wooden bins brimming with polished rocks. My parents pointed out houses belonging to friends and relatives. My mom told stories about running downhill from school and spending nights with her grandparents, one set on Chestnut and one set on Uintah.

I have always loved it here. I pinch myself every day, hardly believing that I get to live here, that every time the car heads west, I’m going home.

The Circle in the Square, by Victor Shepard - Runner-Up

It’s funny how memories work. The passing of fifty five or so years doesn't diminish the desire to somehow recapture the beauty and love that were experienced so long ago. I know the ice cream was much sweeter and creamier then. The flowers my grandma raised were much more fragrant than flowers are today. And most definitely people were so much kinder then. People didn't have the apprehension and distance that is so prevalent today. At least that’s the way I choose to remember it.

Every child looks forward to summer and my summers always included visiting my grandmother in the “burg” of Colorado City. This was the main highlight of every summer and a time that I remember fondly. Grandma’s house was only a block away from the library where I read the adventures of the places I was going to visit one day when I was “old.” In close proximity were the drug stores with real fountains like Cooper-Lidke and the Rexall, a good place to get a chocolate or cherry Coke. Then I’d buy a fifteen cent wooden plane at the Duckwalls, which would last about ten minutes. In the center of this playground neighborhood was a park to play in with a central square and the treasure of the town, the first capitol of Colorado. This park was a hub where the entire neighborhood was welcomed and encouraged to come to.

Wednesday nights in the “burg” were the most special because that was the night when there was square dancing in the park. Although I was only six or seven, it was a weekly ritual that included special food and more importantly, staying up late. I’d get to wear my little cowboy boots and western shirt and get pinches from my grandma’s friends. Watching the big people in their fancy clothes, swiftly moving through difficult dance maneuvers, was quite a sight. But they all seemed happy and certainly appeared to be having a good time. Eventually, the inevitable happened, grandma wanted me to ask a very apprehensive little girl to dance. I was not a completely willing participant in the process but the coaxing finally compelled us wee ones to join in the confusing mob moving to an old man’s call on a screechy microphone. We were both confused and afraid of being trampled by the big people as they sashayed and promenaded around in close order. Somehow we devised our own rhythm and moves and somehow managed to avoid serious contact and injury. The more time we spent dancing the more fun it became. The dance seemed to last late into the night, and I must have been especially tired, as my grandma was forced to carry me home.

Yes, memories can cause us to smile and dancing can still wear me out but I wouldn't trade a moment I've experienced for half a dollar. I still love the park, the band shell and the fistful of valuable and memorable experiences that Bancroft Park has given me throughout many happy years.

Lower Gold Camp Road Today "Ties", by Andrea Corley - Runner-Up

I am a transplant, not a native Westsider. I came here to college and really never left. I have lived in the same place on the Westside for 46 years. I married a local man with Westside ties – railroad ties. His grandfather bought one of the railroads that traveled through the Westside to Cripple Creek a century ago, tore it up, sold the rolling stock and made a toll road for automobiles on the CS&CCDRY bed. It is now called the Gold Camp Road.

Yesterday, driving with a friend on Lower Gold Camp Road, we passed the ground-breaking for a new facility east of my friend’s home at The Village at Skyline. She did not know what is to be built there, but reading the current Westside Pioneer I learned it is to be a memory facility called Morning Star at Bear Creek. I thought” how fitting” in an area full of my family’s memories. The road we were traveling on next to this new facility was once-upon-a-time the initial part of what was called the Corley Mountain Highway. It was gently graded for train traffic first, as the route west out of Colorado Springs to the foothills for the railroad nicknamed ( because it was) the Short Line to Cripple Creek. Now a city street, Lower Gold Camp Road has become, according to Bill Vogrin in the Gazette, a race track for prospective buyers testing their new cars.

Next time you are there, testing or not, imagine the trains going and coming on that very roadway, loaded with freight or gold ore depending on the direction of travel, plains or mountains up ahead, tracks and ties, not tires, underneath you. Then, remember the clickety-clack rhythm of any train ride you have taken, and this becomes Time Travel for the Twenty-first Century with memories of your own. For me, a transplant in my adopted neighborhood, it becomes ties to my family members in their own time and place.

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