High Prairie Library (HI)

High Prairie Library

Address:
7035 Old Meridian Rd. - map it!
Peyton, CO 80831

Phone: (719) 531-6333, x7003
Contact Us

Hours:
Monday and Tuesday: 9 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Wednesday - Thursday: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Friday - Saturday: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sunday: Closed
Window Hours:
Monday and Tuesday: 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Wednesday - Thursday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Friday - Saturday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sunday: Closed
Holiday Hours and Closures

Bus Route: None

  • Friends of High Prairie Library
  • High Prairie Library Facebook

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High Prairie Library Sustainability Practices

High Prairie Library has been noted for is environmental efforts, becoming a silver level partner with Colorado’s Environmental Leadership Program (ELP) in October, 2019, and a gold level Audubon Habitat Hero in December, 2019.

We also support our sustainable efforts through our seed library and garden and will be partnering with the Fresh Start Center food pantry starting in spring 2020.

Click here for more information about the Environmental Leadership Program.

Click here to learn more about our seed library.


Friends of High Prairie Library

The High Prairie Friends Book Store is open during regular Library hours.

Contact glolesher@gmail.com for more information.

Click here to learn more about the Friends of the Pikes Peak Library District.


 

What's New!

Check out our new virtual services!

Updated April 2, 2020

While our physical locations remain temporarily closed until further notice, you can still use the Library remotely, anywhere and anytime. Our librarians are bringing their services to you!

To view what’s scheduled, visit our “virtual library” calendar of events. For videos, head over to Facebook for our live events and past recordings. (Soon, we’ll post recorded videos on our YouTube channel!)

Here are some of the current virtual opportunities and experiences available to the community:

For adults:

  • Get recommendations during our interactive reader’s advisory!
    Mondays & Thursdays, 1 - 2 p.m. (hosted on Facebook by PPLD Adult Education)
    Looking for new books, authors, movies, and TV shows? Our librarians have plenty of recommendations and will give real-time suggestions!

  • Participate in a live virtual book club!
    Tuesdays, 3 - 4 p.m. (Zoom; see our Facebook events for log-in access.)
    Share what you have been reading and get recommendations from other readers. Also, learn about PPLD resources that can help you find your next great read! It will take place on Zoom each week.

  • Watch a poetry reading!
    Wednesdays, 3 p.m. (hosted on Facebook by PPLD Adult Education)
    Tune in for a weekly poetry reading. Can’t make it live? You can always view the videos whenever it’s convenient for you.

  • Watch a selected movie, and then join us for a live community discussion!
    Fridays, 4 p.m. (Zoom; see our Facebook events for selected movies and more details.)
    We supply the movie list, you supply your own popcorn! Each week our team will feature several movies from PPLD’s streaming movie service, Kanopy, then host curated discussions about the selected movies. View the movie anytime leading up to the discussion, which will take place using Zoom. (Please note that some movies may be rated R and contain adult themes.)

  • Check out staff picks from Regional History & Genealogy!
    Daily (hosted on Facebook by PPLD Special Collections)
    The team will share a post each day, highlighting individual staff member’s interests.

For kids & families:

  • Participate in a virtual Storytime!
    Mondays & Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. (hosted on Facebook by PPLD Kids)
    A children’s librarian will invite you to join in a sing-along and then read a children’s book. Can’t make it live? You can always view the videos whenever it’s convenient for you.

  • Try a new craft or experiment at home!
    Tuesdays & Thursdays, 10:30 a.m. (hosted on Facebook by PPLD Kids)
    A children’s librarian will lead an art, craft, or experiment project with items that can be found in a cupboard. Can’t make it live? You can always view the videos whenever it’s convenient for you.

  • Join us for a virtual song & rhyme time!
    Saturdays, 10:30 a.m. (hosted on Facebook by PPLD Kids)
    A children’s librarian will lead a “Baby/Toddler Time” program that focuses on songs and rhymes. Can’t make it live? You can always view the videos whenever it’s convenient for you.

For teens:

  • Test your skills in a digital escape room!
    Mondays
    Looking to put your puzzling skills to the test? Check back here each week, and we'll provide a new digital escape room to try with your family at home or virtually with friends. First up, visit the Hogwarts Digital Escape Room, created by Sydney Krawiec, Youth Services Librarian, at Peters Township Public Library in McMurray, PA.

  • Be a part of the review crew!
    Anytime
    Anyone from 13 - 18 years old can write an original book review and get an hour of volunteer credit! Check out some past book reviews for examples. Those who are interested can contact our Young Adult Services team to find out more and get started.

Our team continues to explore and expand virtual opportunities that we can bring to you, wherever you may be. Right now, we’re creating new virtual experiences that will launch in the coming days and weeks. Bookmark this page to stay tuned for new additions and updates!

Comments: 0

Last updated April 2, 2020

En español

Pikes Peak Library District is committed to providing Library resources and services to you during these unprecedented times. Thanks to the public’s investment and taxpayer support, we can continue to deliver access to information and opportunities that impact lives and build community across El Paso County.

While our physical locations remain temporarily closed until further notice, you can still use the Library remotely, with many resources available 24/7.

Here are some ways to get the most out of your virtual Library experience:

  • Download our mobile app to view your account, browse and download from our collection, and more. (Pro tip: There are also apps for Libby, OverDrive, Freegal, Kanopy, RBdigital, and more.)
  • Stream and/or download from our digital collection! There are so many options – digital books, audiobooks, comics, magazines, music, and videos – that you can access from almost anywhere.
  • Check out our new virtual services! Our librarians are bringing their services to you, anywhere and anytime. Watch a virtual storytime with your kids, participate in a virtual book club, try a digital escape room, join us for a community movie discussion, do an at-home craft or experiment, and more. (Looking for something else to do? Bookmark the web page and check back often for new updates!)
  • Ask a librarian! We’re here to answer your questions virtually! Use our online “contact us” form – and select “general information / ask a librarian” – to submit your inquiry and receive email follow-up soon.
  • Participate in the Winter Adult Reading Program! It has been extended until further notice. Read books and complete virtual activities to earn prizes, which will be available for pickup after PPLD locations reopen.
  • Use our databases to conduct research for businesses, nonprofits, legal matters, and more. You also can learn a new language, plan your next adventure, and do genealogy research.
  • Have kids or teens in your home? We have ample resources for children and teenagers, including homework help, reading, games, creating, planning for the future, and more. (Also, see above for new virtual services!)
  • Dig into some regional history and genealogy. For example, our digital collection features historic photographs, pamphlets, manuscripts, maps, oral histories, films and more that highlight the rich history of the Pikes Peak area.
  • Find a good book! Check out recommendations, reading lists, and more.
  • Don’t have a library card? Get started and gain online access today.

That’s not all! Our Library staff also assembled and vetted a growing list of free online resources for all ages; no library card needed. Resources include live streaming, virtual tours, activities, and much more. Topics cover arts and culture, kids and teens, learning and reading for adults, professional support and development, and science and nature.

Our team continues to explore and expand virtual opportunities that we can bring to you. Right now, we’re adding to our digital collection, as budget allows, and creating new virtual experiences that will launch in the coming days and weeks.

Stay tuned for more updates from PPLD. We’re here to serve you now and into the future.

Comments: 23

Last updated April 2, 2020

All PPLD facilities will remain temporarily closed until further notice, following state orders and national guidelines regarding the COVID-19 pandemic. During this time, we remain in regular communication with El Paso County Public Health and other local agencies to coordinate and respond together as a community. PPLD’s team continues to evaluate the situation, and we will provide Library updates as circumstances change.

Here’s what you can expect during the temporary closure of all PPLD locations across El Paso County:

  • Use the Library remotely! Stream and download books, audiobooks, comics, magazines, music, and videos. Use our databases to conduct research, access ample resources for kids and teens, and more from your couch.

  • Check out our new virtual services! Our librarians are bringing their services to you, anywhere and anytime.

  • Returning items: Please keep all Library materials at this time. We are not accepting any returns in our book drops; they will be locked for the time being.

  • Checked out items: Due dates have been extended until May for all physical Library materials that are currently checked out. Please check your PPLD accounts either through our Catalog or on the PPLD mobile app for the new return dates, which will be listed by item.

  • Holds & wait lists: Available holds will not expire, and patrons will be able to pick them up when PPLD reopens. Places in hold queues will not change. You can still suspend holds via your account.

  • Fines & fees: We officially went fine-free for most Library materials in early 2019, as long as they are not lost or damaged. (See above regarding checked out items.)

  • OverDrive: Since more patrons are using PPLD digital resources online, cardholders can have 10 checkouts for a total of 14 days each; the holds limit remains at a total of 30. PPLD will continue to add copies of digital materials to our collection as our budget allows. Some digital checkouts can be returned early so others have opportunity for access. Instructions for checking out and returning are available here.

  • Library programs, mobile services, & reservations: All Library programs and events, in addition to public meeting and study room reservations, have been cancelled through at least Sun., April 19; do note that this may be extended depending upon public health guidelines. All scheduled stops and visits by our mobile library services have been suspended as well.

  • Library card signup: Register online and start using your card immediately! If you sign up online during this time, your temporary account will be available for 90 days (instead of the usual 12-day limit), giving you immediate access to OverDrive and other digital resources from home.

  • Account expirations & renewals: Library card/account expirations will be extended, including accounts that expired in the past 24 months.

  • Interlibrary loans: All are temporarily suspended, and requests will be put in a queue. Current due dates have been extended until PPLD reopens. While this change won’t be reflected in accounts, you will not be penalized for keeping these materials.

  • Winter Adult Reading Program: It will be extended until further notice, and all prizes will be held until PPLD locations can reopen.

  • WiFi access: All library facilities continue to provide open WiFi access, which should be available outside of PPLD buildings.

  • Book donations: Please keep books that you intend to donate. Direct such questions and concerns directly to the Friends of PPLD (online form).

  • Have other questions? Use our online “contact us” form to ask about your account, PIN access, or anything else. Select “general information / ask a librarian” to receive prompt email follow-up.

Have questions about COVID-19?
We understand that people may be concerned about COVID-19 and how it may affect them. Please check out the following public resources for more information:

What should I do?
To help stop the spread of germs and any contagious illness, local health experts recommend that everyone should take everyday preventive actions and practice good hygiene like:

  • Frequently and thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer, if you cannot wash your hands.

  • Only use a face mask if you’re ill or have been exposed to a sick individual. Stay home if you’re sick.

  • Keep your hands away from your eyes, nose, and mouth; avoid touching with unwashed hands.

  • Cover your mouth with tissue when coughing or sneezing, and then properly wash your hands.

  • Clean surfaces and personal items, such as cell phones, using household disinfecting products.

  • Consider how your daily activities could be impacted if COVID-19 does spread within our community; create a personal preparedness plan.

What is COVID-19?
There is a global pandemic situation involving a respiratory illness named COVID-19, which is caused by a new coronavirus that spreads through coughing or sneezing, much like influenza (also known as the flu). Since much is still unknown about the novel virus, no vaccine is currently available to prevent COVID-19 infection. There are a growing number of confirmed and presumptive cases in Colorado, including in El Paso County.

For current information and updates on the pandemic:

Comments: 24

Where Is It?
For the last several months, Pikes Peak Library District worked diligently to update and remodel PPLD’s online Catalog, designed with you, our patrons, in mind. We incorporated new features and re-arranged things to provide a cleaner, easier-to-use interface, which gives the catalog a modern, up-to-date look. Some features and links have moved around, so we’ve created this guide to help you navigate it.

The new Catalog went live March 8!


New Features
  • The number of holds, total copies, and available copies are readily visible.
  • The item status is clearer: checked in, checked out, on hold shelf, or being transferred between Libraries.
  • “Add Author Alert” allows patrons to sign up to receive notifications when items by their favorite authors are added to our Catalog. They only need an email address to create an account and can select their preferred format(s).
  • When searching the Catalog within one of our Libraries, that location’s items will show up on top. (When patrons search from home, locations will be listed alphabetically.)
  • Series info, as well as related titles and authors, are now more easily accessible through the Details tab.
  • Options to limit search results are now in drop down menus instead of patrons having to scroll through the myriad options.
  • Links have been pared down or moved to the bottom of the page for less visual clutter.

Additional Information
Comments: 7
Census 2020

The 2020 Census is closer than you think! It is important to fill it out so that local agencies (PPLD included!) have accurate information to use when designing community services. It's safe, easy, and required for all citizens to fill out.


Households will receive a letter with instructions for responding to the census online or over the phone.

Between April 8–16, the Census Bureau will send a paper questionnaire to households that have not yet responded to complete the census by mail.

Beginning in May 2020 households may receive an in-person visit from a Census Bureau employee.


Here’s a quick refresher of what it is and why it’s essential that everyone is counted.
  • Everyone counts: The census counts every person living in the United States once, only once, and in the right place.
  • It’s about fair representation: Every 10 years, the results of the census are used to reapportion the House of Representatives, determining how many seats each state gets.
  • It’s in the Constitution: The U.S. Constitution mandates that everyone in the country be counted every 10 years. The first census was in 1790.
  • It’s about $675 billion: The distribution of more than $675 billion in federal funds, grants, and support to states, counties, and communities are based on census data. That money is spent on schools, hospitals, roads, public works, and other vital programs (like libraries!).
  • It’s about redistricting: After each decade’s census, state officials redraw the boundaries of the congressional and state legislative districts in their states to account for population shifts.
  • Taking part is your civic duty: Completing the census is mandatory: it’s a way to participate in our democracy and say “I COUNT!”

Census data are being used all around you:

  • Residents use the census to support community initiatives involving legislation, quality-of-life, and consumer advocacy.
  • Businesses use census data to decide where to build factories, offices, and stores, which create jobs.
  • Local governments use the census for public safety and emergency preparedness.
  • Real estate developers use the census to build new homes and revitalize old neighborhoods.

Your privacy is protected.
It’s against the law for the Census Bureau to publicly release your responses in any way that could identify you or your household. By law, your responses cannot be used against you and can only be used to produce statistics.

The Census Bureau uses a different method to count people in group living situations, called “group quarters,” such as college student housing, prisons, military barracks, and nursing homes. People experiencing homelessness (and who are not staying in a household) will be counted at the places where they receive services, such as shelters and soup kitchens.

2020 will be easier than ever.
In 2020, you will be able to respond to the census online. The online questionnaire will be available in 13 languages.


Click here to learn more!

Comments: 0
Maker in Residence: Textile Art with Textiles West

When you think of your community, what comes to mind? Learn how to create a fabric collage that celebrates the beauty of our Pikes Peak region. Attendees will create two collages – one for the community art installation, and one to take home! Come learn some fun and simple embellishment techniques using fabric markers and hand embroidery stitches to add detail to your collage.

For ages 12+. Registration is required. 

Please help ensure that other patrons have the opportunity to participate in this program by only registering for one class session.


Class Dates



Create Together

Interested in helping assemble the community art installation? Join Liz and Ruth from Textiles West as they piece together textile illustrations of the Pikes Peak region, made by community members all across El Paso County. These fabric collages will be assembled into an art installation piece that will be displayed at Monument Library in June 2020 for everyone to enjoy.
Create together
No registration is required, just drop in at Monument Library!


Public Reception

See the culmination piece of the Spring 2020 Maker in Residence, Textiles West. Makers Liz Kettle and Ruth Chandler will be available to chat with attendees about the creation of the final textile installation piece, in collaboration with local community members. Light refreshments will be provided, courtesy of Tri-Lakes Friends of the Library at Monument Library.

Sun., June 7 from 2 – 4 p.m.

The art piece will be on display at Monument Library, available for viewing from June 1 – 30, 2020.


The Makers


Textiles West's teachers are all experts who know the power of creating and understand that for many, textiles are a much more accessible art form than traditional art forms.

Liz Kettle

Liz KettleThrough her work, Liz Kettle tells tales that are personal as well as those that speak of relationship, humanity, and the earth. She chooses a nontraditional palette of fabric and stitch because she believes they connect us and draw us closer in a way that cannot be achieved with traditional art materials alone. Liz uses a variety of techniques drawing from the deep wells of quilting, mixed media collage, and paint to tell and support each unique story.

Liz is the co-founder and Director of Textiles West, a Textile Art Center that aims to inspire widespread awareness, participation, and appreciation of textile and fiber arts.

Liz is passionate about teaching and is a co-author of two books; Fabric Embellishing: The Basics and Beyond and Threads: The Basics and Beyond. She is also the solo author of First Time Beading on Fabric, Layered and Stitched and Know Your Needles. Liz has articles published in Quilters Home, Quilting Arts, Quilting Arts In Stitches and Cloth Paper Scissors Studios, and has appeared in the PBS show Quilting Arts TV.

Ruth Chandler

Ruth ChandlerRuth Chandler grew up in Japan where the vibrant color and texture of Japanese fabric, combined with the simplicity of Japanese design, caught Ruth’s attention. Ruth learned basic Sashiko from an elderly neighbor and at the age of four, and began to create and sew her own clothes at the age of ten which became an outlet for her imagination and creativity.

She made her first quilt in 1990, a queen size, hand-appliquéd and hand-quilted Hawaiian pineapple quilt, and she has never looked back. In her own unique style she loves to use new techniques mingled with the old and her work usually shows the influence of her years spent in Japan. Shibori, Boro, Sashiko, and indigo dying are her love, however she also teaches garment sewing and other classes to children and adults.

Ruth teaches locally at Textiles West in Colorado Springs, and nationally at Art and Soul Retreats. Ruth has written several articles for Quilting Arts magazine, blog posts for Havels’ Sewing, and has work published in several books. Additionally, Ruth is one of the co-authors of the best-selling book, Fabric Embellishing: The Basics and Beyond, and is the solo author of Modern Hand Stitching.

Ruth may be contacted for nationwide classes at ruthachandler@comcast.net

Comments: 0
Tax Time!

It's that time again. Taxes are due on Wed., July 15. Lucky for you PPLD has all the information you need to file on time. Visit our Tax Information page for more.


Good luck and happy filing!

Comments: 2
Scrap Exchange with Who Gives a Scrap image

In collaboration with Who Gives a SCRAP Creative Reuse Center, we are hosting an arts, craft, and hobby material exchange! Bring in your new, clean/gently used and unwanted craft materials and exchange them for tickets to exchange new-to-you craft supplies!

Please only bring in crafting supplies and not items that are considered trash, in bad condition, or items that can be recycled.

We will also have a fun up-cycling craft so you can take your time and check for new inventory! No registration required.

Comments: 0

The top 10 of 2019 are here! Learn more about what the Pikes Peak Region read in 2019 and add any you missed to your 2020 reading list!


Adult Books
  1. Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens
  2. Becoming by Michelle Obama
  3. The Reckoning by John Grisham
  4. Educated: a Memoir by Tara Westover
  5. Wolf Pack by C.J. Box
  6. TransAtlantic: a Novel by Colum McCann
  7. Redemption by David Baldacci
  8. Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty
  9. Unsolved by James Patterson
  10. The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

Teen Books
  1. Nowhere Boy by Katherine Marsh
  2. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K Rowling
  3. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling
  4. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
  5. Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
  6. Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins
  7. The Giver by Lois Lowry
  8. On the Come Up by Angie Thomas
  9. To All the Boys I've Loved Before by Jenny Han
  10. Carve the Mark by Veronica Roth

Children's Books
  1. Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
  2. Harry Potter and the Socerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling
  3. Rain Reign by Ann M. Martin
  4. Nowhere Boy by Katherine Marsh
  5. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Meltdown by Jeff Kinney
  6. The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate
  7. A Long Walk to Water: a Novel by Linda Sue Park
  8. Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
  9. Warriors in Winter by Mary Pope Osborne
  10. The False Prince by Jennifer Nielsen

eBooks
  1. A Dangerous Act of Kindness by LP Fergusson
  2. Redemption: Amos Decker Series, Book 5 by David Baldacci
  3. The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides
  4. Wolf Pack by C.J. Box
  5. After the Flood: A Novel by Kassandra Montag
  6. An Anonymous Girl: A Novel by Greer Hendricks
  7. Run Away by Harlan Coben
  8. Connections in Death by J.D. Robb
  9. The 18th Abduction by James Patterson
  10. Neon Prey by John Sandford

eAudio
  1. The Silent Patient (unabridged) by Alex Michaelide
  2. Girl, Stop Apologizing: A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals (unabridged) by Rachel Hollis
  3. Redemption: Amos Decker Series, Book 5 (unabridged) by David Baldacci
  4. The Giver of Stars: A Novel (unabridged) by Jojo Moyes
  5. City of Girls: A Novel (unabridged) by Elizabeth Gilbert
  6. The Dutch House: A Novel (unabridged) by Ann Patchett
  7. The Institute: A Novel (unabridged) by Stephen King
  8. Daisy Jones & the Six: A Novel (unabridged) by Taylor Jenkins Reid
  9. The Turn of the Key (unabridged) by Ruth Ware
  10. The Guardians: A Novel (unabridged) by John Grisham
Comments: 0
Winter Adult Reading Program: Imagine Your Story

Spring is here, but it’s not too late to join the Winter Adult Reading Program! Imagine Your Story: Fantasy, Mythology, and Fairy Tales, the 2020 Winter Adult Reading Program, is extended until further notice due to the COVID-19 pandemic. All prizes are being held until PPLD locations reopen. Sign up today - just click below!

Click here to register.


To complete the Winter Adult Reading Program, you can either read eight books, or read four books and complete four virtual activities.

Need some suggestions for activities? We’re here to help:

  • Write a book review.
  • Read a book you should have read in high school or college.
  • Read a new genre. Get suggestions here.
  • Read a book about a place you would like to visit.
  • Read a book and then watch the movie it’s based on (use Hoopla or Kanopy with your Library card to watch the movie!).
  • Sign up for a Nextreads Newsletter.
  • Explore the PPLD Digital Collections.
  • Participate in an online book discussion (details to come!).

Prizes
We believe your hard work should be rewarded, so once you complete all eight activities, visit any Library location to pick up a chocolate bar from the Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory, an enamel pin, and a mug. Open to ages 18+.

Click here for a printable reading log.


Comments: 22
The Jean Ciavonne Poetry Contest

Thank you for your interest and participation in the Jean Ciavonne Poetry Contest.

Because of the evolving situation surrounding COVID-19, Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) has made the decision to close all Library facilities until further notice. As a result, the Jean Ciavonne Poetry Contest Awards Reception is postponed, new date to be determined, and the judging process is on hold at this time. We are sorry for any inconvenience this may cause and appreciate your understanding! We extend our gratitude to the dedicated students and teachers who worked hard on their submissions.

Stay tuned for more information, and visit our COVID-19 page to learn more about the Library’s temporary closure.


Poetry Stew: Poems About Food
Children may write about any food, real or imagined.
The Jean Ciavonne Poetry Contest is open to all fourth and fifth graders in the Pikes Peak region.

How to get started:
The food you write about can be a favorite food, a food that you want to try, or even something you never want to eat again! It can even be from your imagination! Try to avoid writing a list of foods, and instead use all of your senses to describe it. How does it taste, feel, smell, look, and maybe even sound?
  • Describe a food you remember eating when you were little. Did you love it or hate it?
  • What are your favorite foods? Remember the first time you tried your favorite food. Do you eat special foods for special occasions, such as holidays or birthdays?
  • If you had to eat the same food every day, for every meal, for the rest of your life what would it be, and why?
  • Have you ever cooked or baked something before? Was it a success or a disaster?

Prizes
Six winners will receive a book and $50 each!
Eligability:
The contest is open to all fourth and fifth graders in the Pikes Peak region.

Contest Rules:  

  1. One entry per student. Teachers are urged to review poems and submit no more than five per class.
  2. Each poem must be the original work of the contestant.
  3. Poems will be judged on originality, including poem title and adherence to the theme.
  4. Submit two typed, double-spaced copies of each poem on 8 ½” x 11” paper (no handwritten submissions or illustrations will be accepted.) Include on a separate piece of paper: name, telephone number, home address, school name and address, and teacher and principal’s names. Poems will not be returned. Please keep a copy.
  5. Entries must be postmarked by March 3, 2020.

Submission of a poem constitutes full permission to exhibit, use and publish the poem for any purpose – printed or electronic media – and to publish the name, school, and photographs of the student without compensation.

Entries may be mailed to:

The Jean Ciavonne Poetry Contest
c/o Carol Scheer
Pikes Peak Library District
P.O. Box 1579
Colorado Springs, CO 80901-1579

Or email entries, following guidelines above to: cscheer@ppld.org

Questions?
Call Evan Childress at 531-6333, ext. 6069


The awards will be announced in April, and the award ceremony will be April 11, 2020.
Comments: 6
Medicare 101 image

Are you thinking about retiring in the next few years? Are you unsure about how health insurance and Medicare will affect you once you turn 65? Are you helping your parents navigate their Medicare coverage? Join us to learn about Medicare and your health insurance options, to be a better informed consumer and to be secure in your health insurance choices.

Presented by PPACG Area Agency on Aging staff, this two-hour presentation covers the basics of Medicare A, B, D and all other insurance options, such as Medicare Supplements/Medigaps, Medicare Advantage plans and Medicare Part D. Come get unbiased information from the AAA Senior Insurance Team to help you successfully navigate your transition to Medicare and retirement.

Registration required. You can choose a link below or call (719) 389-8968.

For information on additional classes visit PPACG Area Agency on Aging, or call (719) 471-2096.

Comments: 0

make it personal
In Pikes Peak Library District’s Makerspaces, we offer access to tools, materials, and machines to help bring your creative vision to life. Before you visit our spaces, make sure to familiarize yourself with our Makerspace Policy, and review information about accessing the spaces. Using the Makerspaces requires a little bit of background, so review the section below for the craft you are interested in. Use #MakeItPersonal to share your creations on social media with us!


Need some project inspiration? You can:

DIE-CUTTING

  • Learn: Use the die-cutters at PPLD’s makerspaces to safely and accurately cut or draw designs on paper, vinyl, iron-on transfer materials, cardstock, sticker paper, select fabrics, and other materials. All three makerspace locations offer the Silhouette Cameo 3, and Library 21c also has a US Cutter LaserPoint Vinyl Cutter 25” available for use.

    Come in to use these machines during regular Open Hours at East Library and Sand Creek Library, and during Library 21c’s regular hours of operation, unless a program is scheduled in the space.

  • Design: Browse free designs on the Silhouette Design Store or create your own design using the Silhouette software. It’s easy to bring a clipart file from the internet into the software and add your own touches to it. Use the step-by-step instructions available with every die-cutter machine in the makerspaces.
  • Create: Vinyl sheets and cardstock are available for a small fee at all PPLD makerspaces – call the location of your choice for more information about colors and availability, or feel free to bring your own materials. Each space also has tools for weeding and cutting materials used with the die-cutters.

SEWING

  • Learn: PPLD makerspaces provide a variety of sewing machines to support your textile needs! Our three spaces provide standard sewing machines, embroidery machines (4”x4” workspace), and 3/4 thread overlock sergers, while East Library also provides an industrial machine that can tackle heavy-duty projects.

    These machines are available on a first come, first served basis during Open Hours at East Library and Sand Creek, and during Library 21c’s regular hours of operation, unless a program is scheduled in the space.

  • Design: Find a sewing pattern at a local store, online (we love Pinterest!), or in a book. PPLD’s collection features many types of sewing books, with patterns for quilts, stuffed animals, dolls and outfits, tailored clothing, and much, much more. New to sewing? We’ve got a book for that!
  • Create: Assorted thread and needles are provided, in addition to basic sewing notions such as pins, clips, scissors, fabric measuring tape, rotary cutters and cutting mats. Speak with staff today about how to get started on a sewing project!

3D PRINTING

  • Learn: Make your own tools and trinkets with PPLD’s 3D printers!

    These machines require a badging certification to ensure you understand basic machine operation and safety practices. To become badged, simply watch a video online and take a short quiz. You must get all answers correct to pass the quiz, but can retake it if necessary.

  • Design: You can create your own project using free, open-source software like Tinkercad (great for beginners) or Fusion 360 (good for more advanced models). Not sure you want to dive in to making your own design right away? Search for what you want on Thingiverse, a community for making and sharing 3D printable designs. You can search Thingiverse for keychains, bookmarks, planters, ornaments, and all sorts of other fun and useful items.
  • Create: After you’ve completed the badging quiz and designed or chosen your file, come in to a PPLD makerspace to print it! 3D printers are available on a first come, first served basis during Open Hours, and all makerspace locations have a variety of printer filament to use (call the location of your choice to ask about availability if you have a specific color in mind). Outside filament is not allowed, and prints are weighed after completion; each print costs $0.05 per gram for normal filament or $0.10 per gram for specialized filament. If it’s your first time using a 3D printer or you have any questions, staff will be available to help walk you through the steps.

LASER ENGRAVING/CUTTING


PPLD Make It Personal :30 from PPLD TV on Vimeo.


Makerspaces
  • Make at East
    • 5550 N. Union Blvd.
    • Open Hours:
      • Monday: 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
      • Tuesday: 1 - 8:30 p.m.
      • Wednesday: 5 - 8:30 p.m.
      • Thursday: Closed
      • Friday: 1 - 5 p.m.
      • Saturday: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.
      • Sunday: Closed
  • Make at Library 21c
    • 1175 Chapel Hills Dr.
    • Open Hours: Make is open during regular library hours, as long as the room is not in use for programs or other reservations.
  • Make II at Library 21c
    • 1175 Chapel Hills Dr.
    • Open Hours:
      • Mondays: Closed
      • Tuesdays: 2 - 8 p.m.
      • Wednesdays: 2 - 6 p.m.
      • Thursdays: 2 - 8 p.m.
      • Fridays: Closed
      • Saturdays: 1 - 5 p.m.
      • Sundays: Closed
  • Make at Sand Creek
    • 1821 S. Academy Blvd.
    • Open Hours:
      • Monday: 1 - 5 p.m.
      • Wednesday: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
      • Friday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Comments: 0
eBooks for All!

Publishers are Putting Libraries and Patrons in a Bind
New lending and purchasing models place financial burdens and time limitations on libraries.

Recent moves by book publishers to limit library access to eBooks and eAudiobooks will create increased financial burdens for libraries and wait times for patrons.

The eBook collection at Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) is so popular that the system’s digital circulation now ranks within the top twenty in the nation. PPLD cardholders have already surpassed one million checkouts on OverDrive, one of several eBook services offered by the Library District.

Hachette, Penguin Random House, Simon & Schuster, Blackstone Publishing, and Macmillian Publishers, among others, are changing their lending models for eBooks and eAudiobooks. While these changed lending models vary slightly from publisher to publisher, each change limits library access to digital books and will increase wait times for new releases and other titles.

“Unfortunately, these drastic steps by book publishers are putting Pikes Peak Library District in an extraordinarily difficult position,” said John Spears, Chief Librarian and CEO of PPLD. “Our digital circulation is incredibly high, and we know these new measures are going to increase wait times for our patrons.”

Most of the changes include new purchasing models, so that instead of libraries having perpetual access to each book they purchase, they have to re-purchase the books after two years.

As of Nov. 1, Macmillan Publishers imposed an eight-week embargo on public libraries for the purchase of new eBook titles. Libraries may only purchase a single copy of new eBook titles during the first eight weeks of its release, during which time the titles will be available through marketplace vendors.

“This is an equal access issue for our patrons,” Spears says. “We know that not everyone with a library card will be able to bypass these increased wait times by simply purchasing the digital book somewhere else, and they shouldn’t have to. We urge publishers to reverse or modify these changes, and encourage our patrons to speak out if they agree.”

To learn more about eBook restrictions and how to take action, go to ebooksforall.org.

Comments: 35
Teen Gaming

Gaming programs are designed to provide teens and tweens with a fun, safe program where they can socialize with their peers!

Live Action Clue!
Imagine the board game clue – but live! The rules will likely be a little bit different, but we’ll play a version of the board game but with real people. The murder, however, will still be fake.

Find your Live Action Clue game here.

Escape Room
Time Warp escape Room: You're lost in time and the secret to getting back to 2019 is locked in a box! Can you break in, or will you be stuck in ancient Egypt, the Wild West or the Incan Empire forever? Ages 12-18.

Retro Games
Join other gamers to explore the world of classic video games on the Nintendo and Super Nintendo Classic Consoles.

Click here for Retro Game events!

bingo
BINGO

Please join us right after school for a quick hour of B-I-N-G-O! There will be snacks AND prizes. No registration necessary, just drop-in and bring your friends!

Click here for Bingo!

Tabletop Gaming
tabletop gaming
Love playing board games? Want to try out new games each month and meet other teens interested in board games? Come to the Teen TableTop Gaming! We will learn and play a different game (and sometimes get out old favorites as well!). Drop by and maybe you'll discover your new favorite game! (See specific event for details.)

Click here for tabletop games!

Dungeons & Dragons Club

dungeons & dragons
Join teens who are passionate about Dungeons and Dragons!

Click here to find the club nearest you!

Comments: 0
All Pikes Peak Reads 2019

Stay tuned for the 2020 selections and theme! To get caught up, check out last year's selections:

All Pikes Peak Reads is Pikes Peak Library District's annual program geared towards improving literacy and fostering dialogue across social, cultural, and generational lines. Each year, we select APPR titles that focus on a variety of timely topics and coincide with our planned community-wide programming. In 2019, our titles explored themes of crossings, peace, multiculturalism, identity, friendship, and memory.


Our selected adult title for 2019 was TransAtlantic by Colum McCann.
TransAtlantic
Summary: A tale spanning 150 years and two continents re-imagines the peace efforts of democracy champion Frederick Douglass, Senator George Mitchell and World War I airmen John Alcock and Teddy Brown through the experiences of four generations of women from a matriarchal clan.

About the author: Colum McCann is the author of six novels and three collections of stories. Born and raised in Dublin, Ireland, he has been the recipient of many international honours, including the National Book Award, the International Dublin Impac Prize, a Chevalier des Arts et Lettres from the French government, election to the Irish arts academy, several European awards, the 2010 Best Foreign Novel Award in China, and an Oscar nomination. In 2017 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts. His work has been published in over 40 languages. He is the co-founder of the non-profit global story exchange organisation, Narrative 4, and he teaches at the MFA program in Hunter College. He lives in New York with his wife, Allison, and their three children.


We also selected a book of poetry, Citizen Illegal by Jose Olivarez.
Citizen Illegal
Summary: Citizen Illegal is right on time, bringing both empathy and searing critique to the fore as a nation debates the very humanity of the people who built it." —Eve Ewing, author of Electric ArchesIn this stunning debut, poet José Olivarez explores the stories, contradictions, joys, and sorrows that embody life in the spaces between Mexico and America. He paints vivid portraits of good kids, bad kids, families clinging to hope, life after the steel mills, gentrifying barrios, and everything in between. Drawing on the rich traditions of Latinx and Chicago writers like Sandra Cisneros and Gwendolyn Brooks, Olivarez creates a home out of life in the in-between. Combining wry humor with potent emotional force, Olivarez takes on complex issues of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and immigration using an everyday language that invites the reader in.

About the author: José Olivarez is the son of Mexican immigrants. His debut book of poems, Citizen Illegal, was a finalist for the PEN/ Jean Stein Award and a winner of the 2018 Chicago Review of Books Poetry Prize. It was named a top book of 2018 by NPR and the New York Public Library. Along with Felicia Chavez and Willie Perdomo, he is co-editing the forthcoming anthology, The BreakBeat Poets Vol. 4: LatiNEXT. He is the co-host of the poetry podcast, The Poetry Gods and a recipient of fellowships from CantoMundo, Poets House, the Bronx Council on the Arts, the Poetry Foundation, & the Conversation Literary Festival. His work has been featured in The New York Times, The Paris Review, and elsewhere. In 2018, he was awarded the first annual Author and Artist in Justice Award from the Phillips Brooks House Association and named a Debut Poet of 2018 by Poets & Writers.


Our young adult and children’s title for 2019 was Nowhere Boy by Katherine Marsh.
Nowhere Boy
Summary: Fourteen-year-old Ahmed, a Syrian refugee, and thirteen-year-old Max, an American boy, are bound by a secret that sets them on the adventure of a lifetime.

About the author: Katherine Marsh is an author of books for children and young adults including Nowhere Boy, which is being published in over a dozen languages; The Night Tourist, winner of the Edgar Award for Best Juvenile Mystery; Jepp, Who Defied the Stars, a New York Times Notable; and The Door By The Staircase, a Junior Library Guild selection. A former journalist and managing editor of The New Republic, Katherine spent three years in Brussels, Belgium with her family and flock of chickens. She now lives in Washington, DC with her husband, two children, two cats and three chickens.


Every fall we will present a variety of programs to the community including author visits, film screenings, community discussions and panel presentations, theater productions, workshops, music programs, and more. We will be undertaking many of these with our community partners.

Comments: 2

Pikes Peak Library District is pleased to announce the winners of the 2019 Jean Ciavonne Poetry Contest for Children:

Colin Bevan - "Bahamas"
Mayah Bolenbaugh - "The Essence of Warmth"
Eva Goroski - "Bioluminescent Beach at Night"
Brody Karr - "Papayalulu Paradise"
Sally Peterson - "The Mystical Land"
Jana Yuschalk - "Darkling Dwabidisador"


Bahamas
By Colin Bevan

Fisherman rip tonight’s dinner from the ocean
Bloody hands filet the dead fish
Smells of fresh fish turns my head
Salt fills the air rusting old boats
Charcoal beach fires cook todays catch
Warm water surrounds my feet
Small birds run from the waves
Boats dot the horizon for miles
Paradise, I hope I never leave


The Essence of Warmth
By Mayah Bolenbaugh

Firewood receives the spark
Steam rises from the bread, fresh from the oven
Soft snuggle from a purring kitten
Sip a large mug of cider under a changing tree in the fall
Enter a cabin to kick off winter’s freeze
Submerge in hot springs as the snowflakes dance
Comfort and serenity, as the shower pours through your hair
Earth is nourished by the elements
Now the sand takes in the sun
The day’s last hour bathed in dark orange sunshine on a summer’s day


Bioluminescent Beach at Night
By Eva Goroski

Twilight creeps up the coast
Waiting for the moon to come with a gleam
Shells adorn the beach like jewels
Stars twinkle and glimmer like diamonds
Tide pools shine with a radiant beam
The ocean has an eerie glow
Bioluminescent dinoflagellates show off in a chain of lights


Papayalulu Paradise
By Brody Karr

I dream of a land called Papayalulu
It’s a tasty paradise for me and you-you
It’s hard to get to - this is true-true
First you must make a papaya canoe-noe
Row your canoe-noe to the end of the sea
And soon Papayalulu you will see

As papaya trees sway in the papayamint breeze
You can paddle down to the Papaya Juice River with ease
You can even lean over and take a sip
But better take care - your canoe-noe might tip
Look out! What’s that I hear?
It’s Papaya Juice Falls - better stay clear!

Safe at last upon the shore
What’s that sound I cant ignore?
It’s the singing papaya birds high in the trees
A song so sweet my ears it does please
I think I’ll stay a while in this land
Papayalulu is oh so grand!


The Mystical Land
By Sally Peterson

I know a place, not far away
It glistens and it gleams.
I go there every time I sleep
It’s called the “Land of Dreams.”

So when I sleep I don’t count sheep
Or toss and turn in vain.
I just fly to the “Land of Dreams”
In my one-man twinbed plane.

Each night I fly right out the door
And pass the moon and sun.
I’m going to the “Land of Dreams”
To have some dream like fun.

And when I land on snow white sand
A lovely sight I see.
A wondrous civilization is
Stretched out in front of me.

A mountain looms above you
If you look to the west.
On the east there is a river
And a town where you can rest.

There are bubbles in the air
That are floating in the breeze.
You can smell the scent of honey,
And hear the rustling trees.

Then my views were interrupted
By a woman clad in white.
She was the noble Queen
Of this land of truth and right.

“Welcome” she said. “Welcome
Won’t you come to my estate”
And she pointed to a castle
With a shiny marble gate.

“Of course” I said, “how gracious,
How could I refuse?”
We started towards the castle
And she told me all the news.

We walked into the town
Where the buildings stand so tall.
Everything is vibrant
From the big to really small.

The people there wear brilliant robes
Of many different hues.
There are feathers on their hats
And feathers on their shoes.

Aromas that are new
Are wafting towards my face.
I wonder what the food is like
In this amazing place.

We came to a kiosk
Where a man was selling food.
The food was shaped like balls
Some were red and some were blue.

They tasted sweet and juicy,
And suddenly I knew!
They were little berries,
And in the fields they grew.

A woman selling flowers
Gave me a bouquet.
It smelled just like sweet roses
In my wildflower spray.

The red flowers were the largest.
The blue flowers were large, too.
The yellow flowers were tiny.
My favorites were the blue.

We entered a cute clothes shop
Filled with rows of silk,
They were soft and they were comfy,
And smooth and cool like milk.

I chose a robe with red, blue, and yellow
For they would match my blooms.
I got nice shoes and a fine new hat
With fluffy little plumes.

Next we went to a pet shop
And saw a little dog.
He was not like mine at all, though.
My dog is brown like a log.

But this dog had new colors.
This dog was so bright!
So were all the other dogs.
It was a crazy sight!

I thought the cats were normal
Until I heard them speak.
They spoke such perfect English
I fought the urge to shriek!

A bird screeched in the background
And I turned in surprise.
The bird that was behind me
Had creepy human eyes.

The castle was our last stop
And it was getting late.
I was getting pretty tired
When I walked up to the gate.

The gates were swiftly opened.
We ran to a bench and sat.
It was nice to calmly sit there
And hear the robins chat.

Said the Queen “Oh heaven help us.
The feasts about to start”
We raced inside the castle
And I couldn't calm my heart.

I changed my clothes and entered
The room of the great feast.
There were many fruits and veggies
And for meat they had roast beast.

Many fancy people
Were invited here to dine.
Some were very famous.
All were very fine.

They all told me hello
Then sat and ate and ate.
I listened to their stories
As I cleaned off my plate.

A toast was to be done.
I lifted my cup.
Then “beep” went my alarm clock
And quickly I woke up.


Darkling Dwabidisador
By Jana Yuschalk

To bed I went on that ordinary night,
Not knowing in the morning what I may fight.
I woke up on a pile of hay,
Wondering what would fill my day.
Surprised and frightened, I immediately felt.
Suddenly, I wished I could just melt.
It seemed so sunny without any rain.
Smells of sweat hovered over the plain,
From jumping creatures who seemed insane.
The so-called “Dwabis” had a mane.
No animals were there.
Not even a bear.
I was informed, this was Dwabidisador.
Wow, I really need to study by geography more!
The Dwabi’s legs were awfully long.
They jumped then fell, I am not wrong.
The sound of jumping pounded the ground.
Their favorite hobby was jumping. That I found.
The language they spoke was also Dwabidisador.
At least I don’t need to study my languages much more!
“Dwabi fell down,” they said over and over again.
“English without pronouns,” I thought. Until then,
A young Dwabi who was probably only four,
Came up and said, “Why don’t you enter that door.”
I did as he commanded only to find,
A Dwabi whose name was Filabind.
He bought me a cupcake with sprinkles on top,
The smell was so sweet I thought I would pop!
All that was better than the taste, was the smell.
It looked and smelled like sweet caramel.
The taste was Dwabilicious.
Red velvet without mush.
After I finished my delectable cupcake,
I was sure Dwabidisador wasn't fake.
Then we departed and walked a long ways.
We entered a place called “Dwabi’s Good Maze”.
Since Filabind was my guide, he led me through,
A portal that said, “How do you do?”
Filled with wonder and awe, I heard a loud, “MOO!”
Before I knew it, I was back home on our farm.
Lying in my bed was my noisy alarm,
Trying to wake me up from my-dream?
What it was, it filled me with gleam!

Comments: 0

The Teen Art Contest is for teens and by teens. Teens create the art, and teens determine the winners.

The theme for our 2019 Teen Art Contest was "Opposites Attract! "

All of the artwork will be displayed at either Penrose Library, East Library, or Library 21c during the month of April.

Here are this years winners, which you can also view below!

Best In Show
“Poseidon’s Goldfish” by Cole R.

High School - First Place
“Opposites Attract” by Isaiah R.

High School - Second Place
“A Spectrum” by Preston S.

Middle School - First Place
“Steamy” by Teddy K.

Middle School - Second Place
“Concrete Jungle” by Ava K.

Coordinator’s Choice - High School
“Calm Before the Storm” by Lydia M.

Coordinator’s Choice - Middle School
“Strong and Courageous” by Chloe H.

You can view the winners here:

Teen Art Contest 2019 Winners

Comments: 0

Pikes Peak Library District sparks development, opportunity, and inspiration for everyone across El Paso County. Whether you've got a young one who's learning to read, or you're a lifelong learner looking for a new skill, the library has something for you.

We are excited to share stories of how the Library positively impacts the lives of our patrons.

To tell your story, click here to take our short survey or use the hashtag #shareyourspark on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

INSPIRATION

PPLD sparks inspiration. In this video, hear Price Strobidge's story about how the library helped him become Poet Laureate of the Pikes Peak Region.

OPPORTUNITY

PPLD sparks your opportunity. In this video, hear Allan's story about how the Library helped him improve his English language skills and provide him with GED test preparation. Read more about Allan's personal growth and development through the Library in this article from The Gazette.

DEVELOPMENT

PPLD sparks your development. In this video, learn about how our children's areas are free, safe places that encourage development and growth.

Stay tuned to learn how PPLD can spark your opportunity and your inspiration.

Comments: 0

Have you heard about auto-renewals? Beginning Mon., Feb. 11, 2019, PPLD will save you the step of renewing your checkouts.

The day before items are due, the library’s system will automatically renew them if there are no holds and they haven’t already been renewed twice.

There are some exceptions to the materials that can be automatically renewed, including:

  • Rapid Read, Rapid View
  • eBooks, eAudios
  • Equipment
  • Interlibrary Loans

Patrons will receive an email notice letting them know what, if anything, was renewed as well as the new due date.

Comments: 10

Overdue books? Fear not. Pikes Peak Library District will no longer charge you for being a little bit late on your returns.

The library will officially eliminate overdue fines Fri., Feb. 1, just in time for a county-wide celebration of Library Lover’s Month. Patrons will no longer be financially penalized for books that are late in returning to the library.

“Our mission as an organization is to eliminate barriers to information and resources, not create them,” said Director of Library Services Tim Blevins. “We had a trial run of eliminating overdue fines and didn’t see longer hold times for patrons, but did see a positive impact on borrowing. It makes perfect sense for us to permanently eliminate these fines.”

Fines, Blevins says, are particularly prohibitive for the community’s most vulnerable families. Plus, overdue fines accounted for less than one percent of the library’s overall revenue in 2017.

There will still be fees assessed for lost or damaged materials. Materials are considered lost if they are 21 days overdue.

Additionally, Pikes Peak Library District will roll out automatic renewals later on in Library Lover’s Month. The day before books are due, the library’s system will automatically renew them up to two times, so long as no other patron placed a hold on the material.

There are some exceptions to the materials that can be automatically renewed, like rapid reads, e-materials, and equipment checkouts.

“What we’ve seen here, and in library facilities across the country, is that by taking these steps to increase ease of access to materials, use of library resources and checkouts is positively impacted,” Blevins said. “We’re here to help people access the resources they need to achieve their goals. This is just one more way for us to do a better job of achieving that mission.”

Comments: 3

We want to celebrate your successes! Pikes Peak Library District is looking for stories about how our resources and staff have helped enrich minds, fuel learning and growth, spark imagination and ideas, build community and connections, and/or achieve goals.

To tell your story, click here and take our short survey.

Comments: 9
Linda Riley

PPLD Maker in Residence for January/February 2019, Linda Riley learned to knit when she was a young girl, taught by her granny when growing up the Chicago suburbs. She continually grew her skills and eventually began creating her own unique patterns. Her original designs have been published in both print and online outlets. Her project portfolio ranges from simple items such as hats and scarfs all the way to full size afghans and cable knit sweaters. Mittens are her favorite item to knit!

Visit PPLD's Maker/Artist in Residence page for more information about this program.

Comments: 2

The 2018 Teen Fiction Anthology is here!

Click the link below to read the award winning stories from the 2018 Teen Fiction Writing Contest.

Comments: 0

The Teen Art Contest is for teens and by teens. Teens create the art, and teens determine the winners.

The theme for our 2018 Teen Art Contest was "Hidden Beauty." Teens were encouraged to show us where they have found hidden beauty in the ordinary, everyday world.

All of the artwork will be displayed at either Penrose Library, East Library, or Library 21c during the month of April.

Here are the winners!

Best In Show
Clear by Isabella Huhn

High School - First Place
Letting Go by Celine Hanlon

High School - Second Place
Masked by Elizabeth Ward

Middle School - First Place
Beauty Is in the Eye of the Beholder by Connor Murdock

Middle School - Second Place
Beauty of the Mountain by Adyline Poirson

Coordinator’s Choice - High School
Color through Clutter by Rebecca Gearhart

Coordinator’s Choice - Middle School
A Shoe by Adia Byron

You can view the winners here:
Teen Art Contest 2018 Winners

Comments: 0
Joanna Bolek

PPLD's Maker/Artist in Residence for March/April 2018 was Joanna Bolek. She has taught art processes in the context of mindfulness/awareness for over 20 years to diverse populations. She has a masters degree in art education. She is also a qualified meditation and Dharma Art instructor.

Sarah tought throughout Pikes Peak Library District, as well as hosting open studio hours at Library 21c.

Visit PPLD's Maker/Artist in Residence page for more information about this program.

Comments: 2
Repair Café Volunteers Needed

PPLD's Repair Café is in need of BIKE fixers! Fill out a volunteer application at ppld.org/repair-cafe or stop by your local library!

Repair Café is a neighborhood initiative that promotes repair as an alternative to tossing things out. At a Repair Café you’ll find the tools and materials needed to repair your broken items, as well as knowledgeable volunteers who will show you how to do it. Repair Trainers will offer a diagnosis and suggested remedy for broken items, repairing items when possible and otherwise explaining what parts you may need to obtain to complete the repair.

Comments: 0
Best Workplaces 2017

At an awards ceremony on Mon., Nov. 27, 2017 at the Antlers hotel, Pikes Peak Library District was named Best Workplace by The Gazette in the Extra Large Company (300+ employees) category.

According to The Gazette, PPLD "ranked high among its employees in social responsibility, providing meaningful work, confidence in leadership, being a place workers would recommend to others for employment and operating with strong values and ethics."

Here is a video The Gazette created, which was shown at the ceremony.

Comments: 4

Congratulations to the winners of our first All Pikes Peak Writes, PPLD's adult fiction writing contest. You can read the winning entries by clicking here.

1st Place
"I Don't Blame Him for Dying" bu Andrew Beasley

2nd Place
"Puddle" by Andrea Malcom

3rd Place
"The Photograph" by Jacqueline Peveto

Honorable Mention
"Apostrophe" by Ariane Peveto

Honorable Mention
"Dr. Luckwood" by Jill Long

Comments: 0
Barbara Dimond

PPLD's Maker/Artist in Residence for May/June 2017 was Barbara Dimond. She considers herself a mixed media artist working in out of the box processes in collage, as well as paper mache. Originally from New York City, she has been living in Colorado Springs and New Mexico for her adult life. Trained as a handmade paper artist, she collects papers and fibers found, bought, and prepared. Barbara teaches art around the region and has been on the faculty of the Fine Arts Center Bemis School of Art for well over 20 years. She loves to share her artistic ideas and processes with her students. Barbara went to the City University of New York, getting a degree in art and art education. She then did her graduate work in Southwest Studies at the Colorado College.

Visit PPLD's Maker/Artist in Residence page for more information about this program.

Comments: 0

The Teen Art Contest is for teens and by teens. Teens create the art, and teens determine the winners.

The theme for our 2017 Teen Art Show & Contest was Transformation Teens were encouraged to show us how art impacts your life, or how it transforms the world around you.

All of the artwork will be displayed at either Penrose Library, East Library, or Library 21c during the month of April. Questions? Contact Becca Phillipsen at (719) 531-6333, x6336 or rphillipsen@ppld.org.

Here are the winners!

Best in Show

"Mirror Reflection" by Aleyah B.

High School

1st Place: "My Fantasy" by Elizabeth W.
2nd Place: "Summer Sunsets" by Kaylee T.
Coordinator’s Choice: "Hands of Time" by Mary R.

Middle School

1st Place: "Transportation through Time" by Liberty H.
2nd Place: "Evolution" by Mikayla R.
Coordinator’s Choice: "Coy Fish Pond" by Kristine B.

You can view the winning works here:

2017 Teen Art Contest Winners

Comments: 1
Check Out Colorado Backpack

Reserve your free State Parks Pass and Backpack today by clicking here!

This program is a partnership with the Colorado Department of Education, State Library, local library systems, and Colorado Parks and Wildlife. It is meant to encourage Coloradans to visit our State Parks and experience all of the great outdoor recreation that this state has to offer.

Each backpack, which checks out for one week, includes:

  • State park pass
  • Leave no trace card
  • Activity idea list
  • Colorado trees and wildflower guide
  • Colorado Wildlife guide
  • Guide to Colorado's 41 State Parks
  • Fishing Basics Sheet
  • Binoculars
  • The Night Sky Guide
  • About the "Checkout Colorado" Backpack Laminated Handout
  • Evaluation/Survey

Click here for more information about this program.

Please contact Meagan Huber at (719) 531-6333, x6062 with any questions.

Comments: 14

PPLD now has Sorenson videophones and Video Relay Service-equipped laptops available for patron use. VRS allows people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or speech-impaired to communicate using American Sign Language through video equipment. It replaces TTY or Text Telephone.

Videophones are now available at the East Library and Library 21c.

VRS-equipped laptops are available at the following PPLD locations: Cheyenne Mountain, High Prairie, Manitou Springs, Monument, Old Colorado City, Ruth Holley, and Sand Creek libraries.

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Beginning Jan. 9, 2017, PPLD will no longer charge fines on overdue children and teen items. Removing overdue fines will provide greater opportunity for children and teens to use the full range of library services. Currently, 15% of children and teen cardholders are blocked from checking out items at the library due to overdue fines.

Also, overdue fines on DVDs and games will be reduced from 25 cents per day to 10 cents per day.

PPLD seeks to foster literacy and life-long learning for children and teens. The Library regularly evaluates policies to see what barriers for service exist and evaluates how to eliminate such barriers. The Library’s Board of Trustees approved the new policy at their December meeting.

Items that will not accrue overdue fines must be designated as “juvenile” or “teen” in the Library catalog. The policy will take effect for any items checked out January 9 or after. Lost item and damage fees will still apply.

Overdue notices will still be sent as reminders to return Library items. Items not returned within 21 days of the due date will be considered lost, and the full cost of the item will be charged to the patron’s account.

Click here for more information

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Have you read a really great (or really bad) book lately? Tell us all about it! Just fill out this book review form and your review will be posted in the Book Reviews section of ppld.org.

Happy reviewing!

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clay snake

PPLD's Maker/Artist in residence for June and July of 2016 was Patricia Moore. Patricia has been making all kinds of crafts forever. She believes in the magic of arts/crafts bringing wholeness and joy into life. She has been teaching arts/crafts to children and adults since around 1985. Patricia believes in Expressive Art and has used that to help children in different programs such as CASA.. Polymer clay is the main medium that she works with finding its possibilities near endless. Patricia lives in beautiful Black Forest on five acres with her teenage sons and many delightful animals.

Visit PPLD's Maker/Artist in Residence page for more information about this program.

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High Prairie Library Launches Seed Library

The High Prairie Seed Library officially launched on Saturday, April 25, 2015!

PPLD is very proud of the hard work that Rhonda Curtis, High Prairie staff member extraordinaire, has put into this 2 year project.

High Prairie Library kicked off the grand opening with a speech from Rhonda (and tutorial), ribbon cutting, cake (carrot), refreshments, and lots of community engagement! In the process of creating the Seed Library we have made some strong connections to our communities in the area, garden clubs, and independent farmers, including generations of growers in the county extending to Calhan.

High Prairie Library will conduct a contest for the biggest pumpkin patrons can grow using the giant pumpkin seeds from the Seed Library! The pumpkins will be judged at the 4th Annual Harvest Festival on October 3, 2015.

A special thanks goes to the High Prairie Friends and staff, who have all contributed both time and resources to help get the Seed Library open.

The High Prairie Seed Library joins the Manitou Springs Seed Library as PPLD's two seed repositories.

Click here to visit the High Prairie Seed Library web page.

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