What's New!

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Announcement

To our Library cardholders and patrons:

As President of Pikes Peak Library District’s Board of Trustees, I wanted to inform you of a decision that was collectively made by the Library’s governing body during a special meeting yesterday.

PPLD’s Board has withdrawn its intent to participate in the November 2022 general election. We heard from the community, listened to feedback, and decided now is not the time to ask voters for additional funding. But, we must continue such discussions if we want to do what’s right for our growing community and the Library District into the future.

As a Library Trustee since 2019, I’m fully aware of PPLD’s need to address its funding challenges and find sustainable solutions as we look ahead to future years. El Paso County has more than doubled in population size since the last voter-approved mill levy increase in 1986. If we want to keep pace with the sprawling growth and ever-changing community needs, we’ll need to continue exploring and assessing options that may involve going to the voters at another time.

Library Trustees and staff heard from more than 1,000 community members during the public input period of the Library’s strategic planning process last month, and we greatly appreciate everyone’s valuable input and engagement. There were many common themes across El Paso County, as well as amongst Library patrons, community leaders, and staff. Two of them were expanding service hours at existing Library locations and adding new PPLD facilities in areas that lack easy access – and those would only be possible with additional funding for the Library District.

As a public institution that’s here for everyone, PPLD currently provides world-class resources, services, and spaces to nearly 700,000 residents across 2,070 square miles. For the Library to continue offering what the community needs and wants, now and into the future, we must consider opportunities for sustainable funding.
Thank you for being cardholders and patrons of our great library system.

Sincerely,

Dr. Ned Stoll
President, Board of Trustees
Pikes Peak Library District


July 20, 2022

Library Board approves resolution indicating intent to participate in general election

During their public meeting on July 20, Pikes Peak Library District’s Board of Trustees took their first steps to place an initiative on the ballot for November 8, 2022. They approved a resolution indicating its intent to participate in the general election to ask voters to approve additional funding for Library services, resources, and spaces.

The last time voters approved a tax increase for PPLD was 36 years ago. Since then, the population of El Paso County has nearly doubled, with 400,000 more residents than in 1986 – and what our Library needs to offer to serve those in the Pikes Peak region has changed immensely. This ranges from our Library’s physical and digital collections to access to technology, community spaces, and programs for the youngest learners in our community.

In general, additional funding would allow the Library District to keep pace with providing world-class spaces, services, and resources across El Paso County. Currently PPLD has 16 facilities, three mobile library services, and a large online hub of resources available to more than 700,000 residents across 2,070 square miles. With additional funds, the Library District could better meet the needs and demands of our growing community via our Library resources, services, and spaces. We want to be able to provide what residents need now and into the future – and fulfill our mission of cultivating spaces for belonging, personal growth, and strong communities.

Here’s a snapshot of how the Library could use additional funding to help residents build better lives and strengthen the foundation of the Pikes Peak region:

  • Support early childhood literacy and development via Library services, programs, and resources
  • Expand community spaces available for use by nonprofits, businesses, and other community groups
  • Expand the Library’s physical and digital collections, including books, magazines, movies, music, research databases, online resource centers, and other things like board and yard games, outdoor and sporting equipment, and gardening and other tools
  • Improve access to technology for families and individuals across El Paso County like K-12 students, adult learners, jobseekers, and residents in more rural communities
  • Expand Library service hours and locations across the county so people can more easily access what they need when and where it’s convenient for them

Public libraries play an important role in every community by welcoming all, fostering connections, enriching lives, and helping people reach their full potential at every step of life. We are grateful to you – our Library cardholders and patrons – for your support of our libraries.

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Palmer Lake Concert Series

Pikes Peak Library District is proud to present the 2022 Palmer Lake Library Concert Series! Concerts will be on Fridays in the month of August from 6 – 7 p.m., starting with Aug. 12.

This season's concert series will be held outdoors at the Palmer Lake Village Green & Gazebo, adjacent to Palmer Lake Library. Bring your lawn chairs or blankets and enjoy the music of this summer concert series.

Depending on state and local directives concerning the COVID-19 pandemic, facial coverings and/or social distancing guidelines may be observed.

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Traci Marques - PPWC

by Traci Marques

Like many places across the country, the Pikes Peak region is experiencing a labor shortage. Employers have job openings but either don’t receive many applications or there are skill mismatches between applicants and available positions. Colorado’s unemployment rate recently dropped to 4.1 percent – the lowest since February 2020 – and there are about 13,000 jobs to fill in both El Paso and Teller counties. That means the work of the Pikes Peak Workforce Center (PPWFC) to connect vital businesses with work-ready job seekers is more important now than ever.

At PPWFC one of our core values is collaboration. We understand the value of partnering with other entities to enhance the quality and depth of our services for job seekers and employers. In today’s world of workforce challenges, it truly takes a village to ensure we’re aligning the skills in our workforce with the needs of local businesses.

One of our most valued relationships is with the Adult Education team of Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD). PPWFC is a one-stop shop that helps job seekers or individuals looking to make a career transition to access a variety of resources and opportunities like job training or workshops. Like other community partners, PPLD is a mandatory partner under our federal grant, Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (WIOA). WIOA ensures a collaborative approach to workforce programs, knowing that there is no wrong door to access workforce services. PPLD’s Adult Education team often enhances our work by providing résumé building and other programs to job seekers who aren’t quite ready to come directly to PPWFC for services. It’s instrumental in ensuring job seekers who walk through our doors are set up for success.

An industry hit particularly hard during the pandemic is the service and restaurant industry. We’re still seeing such businesses experience challenges finding qualified staff, and that’s one reason why we have proudly partnered with PPLD for food industry training courses. This five-week program is led by a professionally trained chef who helps participants secure a ServSafe Food Handlers certificate and find work in the culinary field as a prep or line cook. The most recent class graduated 12 students with the competencies to step right into back-of-the-house restaurant jobs. PPLD’s next round of classes begin Mon., Oct. 10, with applications accepted from Aug. 22 - Sept. 25.

We’re also proud of another partnership with PPLD and School District 11 Schools on our Talent Accelerator Grant to improve digital literacy, which can often be a tremendous hurdle for individuals trying to navigate online job searches and interview processes. This was a pilot program for all three entities. Through this grant, we worked with PPLD to provide three evening courses to help individuals improve basic skills with computers and email, as well as internet and career searches; D11 provided computer lab space, plus referrals from PPLD. Participants not only gained new digital tools but also registered for Connecting Colorado, a state database to help match employers with ready-to-work job seekers.

PPWFC is committed to building strong community partnerships to solve our complex workforce challenges. We can do this by leveraging the subject-matter expertise and proficiencies of organizations across the region. Our relationship with PPLD is just one example of how strategic partnerships maximize our ability to ensure that local workforce aligns with the needs of our business community.

If you or someone you know is in the market for a job or looking to make a career change, start by contacting the Pikes Peak Workforce Center or visiting your local library. We also welcome businesses to reach out if they’re looking to obtain, retain or reskill their staff. PPWFC can connect you to available resources and opportunities and help everyone take the next step in their career.

Traci Marques is the Executive Director/CEO of the Pikes Peak Workforce Center, the American Job Center serving El Paso and Teller counties. Learn more about the Center’s services for job seekers and employers at ppwfc.org.

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Colorado Day

Celebrate Colorado Day Mon., Aug. 1 and enjoy other events throughout the month of August.


Genealogy Basics (Colorado Edition)

Are you interested in researching your genealogy, but aren't sure where to start? Join us for an introduction to basic genealogy research strategies including getting started, organizing research, and selecting and searching for records.

In celebration of Colorado Day, this month's Genealogy Basics classes will focus on researching your Colorado ancestors!


Gift of History Family Fun Day at the Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum

Fun for children, families, and adults.

Children's booth with the Pikes Peak Poet Laureate participating.

Greenscreen photo booth – Take a picture with a historical photo background!

  • Sat., Aug. 6 – 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

The History of the Alexander Film Company

In celebration of Colorado Day, join us for this exciting look into our local history! Established in Colorado Springs in 1927, the Alexander Film Company was the largest producer of advertising playlets for movie theaters in the country. They created the concept of television commercials, which they also produced in the 1950s with the introduction of the television format. At one time, the Alexander Film Company had 600 employees in Colorado Springs and manufactured the popular Alexander Eaglerock biplane until 1931. This presentation will also share video clips of the Alexander Film Company’s award-winning commercials and animations. Did you know? PPLD's archival collections include the Alexander Industries Photograph Collection, which focuses on the staff, activities, and products of the various companies that, over the years, made up Alexander Industries. Take a look at our Digital Collections!


Resources:

Adult

Have you checked out our digital archive? PPLD's Digital Collections features historic photographs, pamphlets, manuscripts, maps, oral histories, films and more that highlight the rich history of the Pikes Peak region. The materials come from the Special Collections of Pikes Peak Library District, housed in the 1905 Carnegie Library in downtown Colorado Springs.

Pikes Peak NewsFinder is our local historical newspaper index. This index contains citations to and scanned images of local news articles and obituaries from the Colorado Springs Gazette and other local newspapers from as early as the 1870s!

Children/Families

Need homework help? Check out our Colorado Homework Help page to get started with biographies, databases, and recommended websites.


Website Links:

Adult

Visit PPLD’s Regional History & Genealogy page to learn how you can research our local history. We have historic photos, manuscripts, books, and more!

Visit PPLD Special Collections’ Facebook page in August! We’ll be posting fun facts about Special Collections all month long!

For immediate release – The Friends of the Pikes Peak Library District will inaugurate a new series of programs, Meet the Author, at 1 pm Saturday, Sept. 17 at the East Library, 5550 N. Union Blvd.

Green, a Colorado Springs outdoorsman, writer and photographer, has written nearly 50 books on rock climbing, hiking and scenic byways all over the West, and particularly in Colorado, since 1977. His newest book is “Hiking Colorado’s Hidden Gems,” from Falcon Press.

His talk about fall color drives will include recommendations on the best regional routes to consider for leaf-peeping this autumn, and discuss some of the landmarks and historic features along the way.

Green is a former Golden Quill Award winner, an annual honor bestowed by the Friends. After his talk, he will have copies of his books for sale and will autograph them.

Admission is FREE for Friends members, or $5 at the door for non-members. To join Friends in advance of the event, visit this link: https://ppld.org/friends/join

Please RSVP for this event so that we may accommodate all who wish to attend and supply free refreshments for everyone. Do so by e-mailing diehlbev@hotmail.com or by texting or calling (719) 573-4894.

For more information, call 719-531-6333, x1461.

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All Pikes Peak Reads 2022

Pikes Peak Library District is pleased to announce the selected titles for All Pikes Peak Reads (APPR) 2022. This year’s titles explore the theme of “reinvention.”

 

All Pikes Peak Reads is Pikes Peak Library District’s annual community reads program that focuses on celebrating literature, improving community connections, and fostering dialogue across social, cultural, and generational lines. Each year, PPLD selects APPR titles that focus on a variety of timely topics and plans a variety of community wide programs. This year’s selected titles explore themes of “reinvention.” Below are the books and descriptions of each selection for 2022.


Adult Selection: The Library Book by Susan Orlean

The Library BookA dazzling love letter to a beloved institution – and an investigation into one of its greatest mysteries – from the bestselling author hailed as a “national treasure” by the Washington Post.

On the morning of April 29, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual fire alarm. As one firefighter recounted, “Once that first stack got going, it was ‘Good-bye Charlie.’” The fire was disastrous; it reached 2000 degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposely set fire to the library – and if so, why?

Weaving her lifelong love of books and reading into an investigation of the fire, award-winning New Yorker reporter and New York Times bestselling author Susan Orlean delivers a mesmerizing and uniquely compelling book that manages to tell the broader story of libraries and librarians in a way that has never been done before.

Susan OrleanIn The Library Book, Orlean chronicles the LAPL fire and its aftermath to showcase the larger, crucial role that libraries play in our lives; delves into the evolution of libraries across the country and around the world, from their humble beginnings as a metropolitan charitable initiative to their current status as a cornerstone of national identity; brings each department of the library to vivid life through on-the-ground reporting; studies arson and attempts to burn a copy of a book herself; reflects on her own experiences in libraries; and reexamines the case of Harry Peak, the blond-haired actor long suspected of setting fire to the LAPL more than thirty years ago.

Brimming with her signature wit, insight, compassion, and talent for deep research, The Library Book is Susan Orlean's thrilling journey through the stacks that reveals how these beloved institutions provide much more than just books—and why they remain an essential part of the heart, mind, and soul of our country. It is also a master journalist's reminder that, perhaps especially in the digital era, they are more necessary than ever.

Author visit

When: Thu., Sept. 29 at 7:30 p.m.
Location: Library 21c
Click here to register


Young Adult Selection: Scythe by Neal Shusterman

ScytheThou shalt kill.

A world with no hunger, no disease, no war, no misery. Humanity has conquered all of those things and has even conquered death. Now scythes are the only ones who can end life – and they are commanded to do so, in order to keep the size of the population under control.

Citra and Rowan are chosen to apprentice to a scythe – a role that neither wants. These teens must master the “art” of taking life, knowing that the consequence of failure could mean losing their own.

Neal Shusterman Bio:

Neal Shusterman is the New York Times best-selling author of more than 30 novels for children, teens, and adults. He won the 2015 National Book Award for Young People’s Literature for Challenger Deep and his novel, Scythe, was a 2017 Michael L. Printz Honor book, and is in development with Universal Studios as a feature film. His novel, Unwind, has become part of the literary canon in many school districts across the country and has won more than 30 domestic and international awards. Shusterman is currently co-writing the pilot episode of Netflix’s adaption of his “timely, speculative thought experiment in perspective, privilege, and identity” (KIRKUS), Game Changer, while his harrowing tale of survival, Dry, is in development at Paramount Pictures. His most recent thriller, Roxy, which was cowritten with his son Jarrod, “portrays the opioid crisis in a way older YA readers can feel and understand” (Booklist).

Neal ShustermanShusterman has also received awards from organizations such as the International Reading Association, and the American Library Association, and has garnered a myriad of state and local awards across the country. His talents range from film directing, to writing music and stage plays, and has even tried his hand at creating games.

Shusterman has earned a reputation as a storyteller and dynamic speaker. As a speaker, he is in constant demand at schools and conferences. Degrees in both psychology and drama give him a unique approach to writing, and his novels deal with topics that appeal to adults as well as teens, weaving true-to-life characters into sensitive and riveting issues, and binding it all together with a unique and entertaining sense of humor. Neal lives in Jacksonville, Florida, but spends much of his time traveling the world speaking and signing books for readers.

Author visit

When: Thu., Sept. 22 at 6 p.m.
Where: Library 21c
Click here for more information


Children’s Selection: The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle by Leslie Connor

The Truth as Told by Mason ButtleMason Buttle is the biggest, sweatiest kid in his grade, and everyone knows he can barely read or write. Mason’s learning disabilities are compounded by grief. Fifteen months ago, Mason’s best friend, Benny Kilmartin, turned up dead in the Buttle family’s orchard.

An investigation drags on and Mason, honest as the day is long, can’t understand why Lieutenant Baird won’t believe the story Mason has told about that day.

Both Mason and his new friend, tiny Calvin Chumsky, are relentlessly bullied by the other boys in their neighborhood, so they create an underground haven for themselves. When Calvin goes missing, Mason finds himself in trouble again. He is desperate to figure out what happened to Calvin and eventually Benny. But will anyone believe him?

Bio of Leslie Connor:

Leslie ConnorLeslie Connor is the author of several award-winning books for children including, two ALA Schneider Family Book/Award winners, Waiting for Normal and The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle, which was also selected as a National Book Award finalist. Her other books include: All Rise for the Honorable Perry T. Cook, Crunch, and The Things you Kiss Goodbye. She lives in the Connecticut woods with her family and three rescue dogs. You can visit her online at www.leslieconnor.com.

Author visit

When:
Thu., Oct. 20 at 10 a.m. – Click here for more information and to register for this time.
Thu., Oct. 20 at 1 p.m. – Click here for more information and to register for this time.
Where: Virtual

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Draw Your Community

We’re celebrating our communities through drawing! Submit a drawing depicting what you love about your community/neighborhood (a place, a person, an idea) for display in a September art show at participating libraries.

All through August, free drawing supplies and drawing classes will be available at Cheyenne Mountain Library, Manitou Springs Library, Monument Library, Old Colorado City Library, Penrose Library, and Rockrimmon Library. All ages and skill levels are welcome to participate.

Submit your drawing in person at one of the libraries above or online here from August 1 - August 31!

Click here for the full calendar of our free drawing workshops from local artists in August. Looking for an online option? Check out How to Draw - Great Courses series on Kanopy!

 

Libraries will display their community’s drawings in September. An online gallery will also be available to browse. Artists are invited to the gallery open houses in September to talk about their work with the public and to meet other artists.

Drawing Workshops

Join local artists to learn the basics of drawing in these workshops! Participants are encouraged to submit a sketch to the community art gallery show we will be putting on in September.

Open Houses

Join us this September to celebrate and appreciate the works of local artists from our Draw Your Community program. This reception will include a meet and greet with artists. Light refreshments provided. No registration required for this free program.

 

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Shivers concert 2022

Returning on Sun., July 31, after a two-year absence, the Shivers Concert Series at Pikes Peak Library District presents “An Evening of Inspirational Word and Song” in honor of Ms. Opal Lee, the “Grandmother of Juneteenth,” featuring special guest Ms. Gigi Coleman, great grandniece of Bessie Coleman the first female African American pilot.

The evening’s musical guests include

  • John Redmon – Pianist
  • Stevie Astley – Soprano
  • Pikes Peak Community College Choir
  • The RoomHouse Multicultural Choir
  • Charles Swinton

This year’s concert is being offered at no charge. Seating is limited, however, so RSVPs are still required. To RSVP, please visit: tinyurl.com/shiversinjuly.

Donations to the Shivers Fund at Pikes Peak Library District will be accepted at ppld.org/foundation/donate.

To view the invitation, click here.

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Care & Share Food Bank

Need extra food for you and your family? We partner with Care & Share Food Bank to bring their “grocer on wheels” to Library patrons weathering life’s storms. Their Mobile Market ensures people have access to fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as pantry staples, right in their neighborhoods. All food is free of charge and open to the public.

July

 August

 September

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Wildfire

Ten years ago, the Waldo Canyon Fire burned through one neighborhood and forced the evacuation of thousands of people. Less than a year later the Black Forest Fire destroyed hundreds of homes north of Colorado Springs. Each fire ended two lives and disrupted countless others. At the time, both fires became the most destructive in Colorado History. The proximity of the fires, both geographically and chronologically, compelled our community to look at wildfires differently.

Visit Special Collections, located at Penrose Library, to see the new exhibit Wildfire, which presents the story of the Waldo Canyon Fire and the Black Forest Fire. Knowledgeable Regional History and Genealogy team members can also help you explore historic resources including our archival records, photographs, and secondary sources. PPLD collects and preserves these historic materials for the benefit of the community.

Whether you lived through these events or are a newcomer to the region, you will learn something about our community with a visit to see this exhibit. Special Collections is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

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sharkgame

Shark Week begins July 24. Here's a preview into our cool shark game Take and Make, for ages 5-12, which will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning July 8, 2022.

Supplies and Directions:

Materials provided in Take and Make:

  • Paper Tube
  • Blue paper
  • Googly Eye Stickers
  • Yarn
  • Bead

Materials you provide:

  • Scissors
  • Tape
  • Markers
  1. Tape blue construction paper around the paper roll.
  2. Create and tape a triangular fin to the top.
  3. Decorate the roll at one end to look like a shark with its mouth open. Use the sticker eyes if desired.
  4. Push one end of the yarn through the bead and tie a double knot. You may need to use a pencil to push the yarn through.
  5. Tie a double knot around the paper roll. Leave approximately 6-8 inches for the ball to swing on. Cut off any excess yarn.
  6. Gently swing the ball and see if you can catch it in the shark’s mouth! Gentle swings are the key!
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Public Input - Library Strategic Planning Process

Pikes Peak Library District recently released its new vision, mission, and values, and now will embark on a strategic planning process for 2023 - 2025.

As part of this, we heard from community members from July 1 - 30. This input will help inform the Library’s direction for the next three years!

In early August, we’ll review and analyze all public and staff input to identify common themes. Then, a planning committee of Library staff, members of PPLD’s Board of Trustees, and community representatives will begin the actual process of developing the strategic plan in August. All collected data will help inform PPLD’s top areas of focus, which will then impact the key strategies and tactics, for 2023-2025.

The Library will release the new strategic plan to the public sometime in October 2022.

Have questions? Contact us!

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Anthony Blog Young

An interview of PPLD patron Philip Riegert – By Anthony Carlson

When I was growing up in Monument, one of the first things my family did when starting to pack for our annual family trip to the east coast was to visit Pikes Peak Library District's (PPLD) Monument Library. Our family car never needed a DVD player to keep us busy on vacations. The Sisters Grimm, Ranger’s Apprentice, and Harry Potter were just a few of the book series that kept mine and my brother’s minds occupied on the 28-hour road trip to visit family. We’d finish reading our book, then trade with each other to read whatever novel or series the other was finishing up.

,p>PPLD wasn’t just a place we visited seeking entertainment for our family on long trips (and to probably save my parent’s sanity traveling with two young boys!), it was a staple in our lives. My mom and dad moved the family to Monument when I was approximately eight years old. Mom would take us to the Monument Library once a week and we would load up on books, movies, and CDs. It was normal for my brother and I to bring home 30 - 40 books and devour them in a week. Even at a young age, the library catalog system was easy enough that I could check out or put books on hold all on my own. However, access to books wasn’t the only thing that made the library feel like the best place to be. Whether it was puppies visiting the library to play with or craft workshops, there was always something fun and adventurous for a kid to do.

Once I transitioned from elementary to middle school, I found myself at the library daily. It was such a great place to do homework, read a book, and provided a safe place to hang out.

Eventually, I started volunteering at PPLD, helping support my favorite program — the Summer Reading program (now the Summer Adventure program). As a kid who loved reading, there was nothing better than reading a bunch of books and being rewarded for completing the program. The prizes I received as I completed books and worked toward finishing the program really motivated me to keep reading. Frankly, the Summer Reading Program is a big reason why I’m such an avid reader today.

Anthony older

My love of the library has only grown over time. When I was a kid I loved the easy access to books, movies, CDs, and the fun programs the library held for the community. However, today I’ve also grown an appreciation for the impact PPLD has on neighborhoods and families. Books aren’t necessarily the cheapest thing in the world. A new hard-covered book will cost you at least $20. Without the library as a resource, many kids and adults would be deprived of the joy of reading. With its wide range of programs and services, the library makes it easy for families new to town to quickly plug in and integrate into a new community. However, what’s amazing is how accessible our library is today. I have three library-specific apps on my phone and can download books directly to my Kindle. I typically rotate through 15 - 16 books at a time. Our library is accessible to the entire community, regardless of whether you want to travel in person to a location or if you simply want to check out a few books from the convenience of your kitchen table. And this is all available to the public for free!

The library inspired my entire family to grow into avid readers. When I was growing up, it gave me a sense of place and community. If you’re someone just dipping your toes into what PPLD has to offer, I encourage you to start with its summer reading program. There are tracks for kids and adults. After all, we’re never too old to be excited about getting free goodies for completing a few good books!


Click here for more People of the Pikes Peak Region stories!


All you need is your library. But your library needs you, too! Support Pikes Peak Library District by making a charitable gift to the PPLD Foundation. Click here to make your donation today. Thank you!

Supplies:

Clean, clear jar with lid
Thin glow stick
Scissors
Table covering or tray
Glitter (optional)
Directions:

With a grown-up's help, cut the tip off the glow stick.
Place the open end of the glow stick in the jar and shake it back and forth so that it splatters. Turn the jar as you splatter.
Add a small pinch of glitter, sprinkling onto the sides of the jar where the splatters are.
Cover with lid and take into a very dark room.
Fireflies are not flies but beetles and do exist in Colorado! They hang out by permanent water sources like ponds, lakes, and streams. Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/LRNWJVQRFYw

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FileFolderAirplane

Take and Makes for this project, for ages 5-12, will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning this Friday, June 10, 2022.

Supplies and Directions:

Materials We Provide:

File Folder

Origami Paper

Rubber Band

Materials You Provide:

Stapler

Scissors

Ruler

Pencil
Directions: (for additional pictures, see pdf link below:
1. Draw a rectangle along the fold of your file folder that’s approximately 4.5 x 7 inches. The folded edge should be part of your rectangle. Cut it out, but don’t cut the folded edge. When you open your rectangle, it should be about 9 inches x 7 inches.

2. Fold one side down to the folded edge. Turn the folder over and do the same to the other side.

3. Fold each side back up to the top. Crease well.

4. Open the folder up along the original fold. Staple the rubber band to one end near that center fold.

5. Use the origami paper to fold a classic dart airplane.

6. Stretch the rubber band around the front of the launcher and around to the back. Hook it to the back near the top.

7. Slide the airplane into the center slot of the file folder launcher. It should rest all the way back against the rubber band.
8. Pull the sides of the launcher apart. The rubber band should propel the airplane forward!

To expand this project, experiment with different weights of paper for your airplane, different rubber band thicknesses, and different launcher lengths. You could also change the trajectory to see how the distance traveled changes.

Based on: https://frugalfun4boys.com/file-folder-paper-airplane-launcher

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Tarjeta de Juego

Have an adventure with Pikes Peak Library District this summer! Summer Adventure presented by Children’s Hospital Colorado helps kids and teens stay engaged and active over the summer months. We know you’re looking for engaging activity ideas, and we are here to help!

Anyone ages 0 - 18 can participate and win prizes through reading, moving, and imagining. Either participate in one of our programs or use one of our activity ideas!

Survey

Finished with the program? Please take our survey and answer a few questions to make next year’s program even better.

 

Sponsored by Friends of PPLD

The adventure runs from Wed., June 1 - Mon., Aug. 15. You can sign up for and start the program on June 1 at ppld.beanstack.org.

Check out our FAQ.

Click here for group registration information.

Have more questions about Beanstack? Email beanstackhelp@ppld.org.

Be in the know: Sign up!

Receive a reminder email at the start of Summer Adventure and emails throughout June, July, and August for summer programs, activities, and more for ages 0 - 18. You can unsubscribe at any time.

 

Event Calendars

 

Game Cards

You can track your progress on the Beanstack app, on the calendars in the Summer Adventure edition of District Discovery, pick up a game card at any Library location, or click here to download and print a physical game card from home!

How to play

  1. Complete an activity (either Read, Imagine, or Move) any day from Wed., June 1 through Mon., Aug. 15.
  2. You can log your progress by recording the dates you complete an activity on Beanstack at ppld.beanstack.org or by using the Beanstack App, available in Google Play or the App Store.  You can also track your progress on the game cards or on the calendars in District Discovery.
  3. You will receive a prize for registering for the Summer Adventure program and a prize when you reach 30 days of activities. You’ll also be entered into the grand prize drawing at 30 days of activities.
  4. Bonus Round: For every additional 10 days of activities you complete after finishing the game (after the initial 30 days of activities), you earn 1 additional entry into the grand prize drawing. You can earn up to four additional entries into the drawing.

If you need assistance, call (719) 531-6333 or visit ppld.org/ask for ways to contact the Summer Adventure staff.

Enliven your Zoom or other virtual conversations with Summer Adventure digital backgrounds: Download below!

Prizes

At registration, ages 0 - 12 can choose a book and ages 13 - 18 can select a book or a journal as their initial prize. After logging 30 days of reading and/or activities, ages 0 - 3 receive a set of bath toy boats, ages 4 - 12 receive a reading award medal, and ages 13 - 18 receive another book or journal.

Grand prizes

After logging 30 days of reading and/or activities, ages 0 - 12 are entered into a Grand Prize drawing for a gift certificate to Kiwico; ages 13 - 18 are entered into a grand prize drawing for a Chromebook®.

*There will be multiple winners throughout the District. Residents of El Paso County are eligible to win the grand prize.

Survey

Finished with the program? Please take our survey and answer a few questions to make next year’s program even better.


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Special Olympics Colorado’s Inclusion Gallery

As part of PPLD's dedication to equity, inclusion, and diversity, we will host Special Olympics Colorado’s traveling Inclusion Gallery exhibit at several locations through the end of 2022.

The Inclusion Gallery showcases acts of inclusion demonstrated through Special Olympics Colorado programs, sports, and more. From taking time with a classmate to showcasing tremendous abilities at the X-Games, these photos inspire.

PPLD patrons can view the exhibit at the following Library locations:

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D11 Summer Lunch

Kids and teens can enjoy lunch (and books) at no cost this summer!

School District 11 will bring their mobile unit to East Library every weekday from June - July!

Anyone up to 18 years old can stop by for a free lunch. In addition to meal service, they'll also have a basket of age-appropriate books that kids and teens can take with them.

Outside of East Library
5550 N. Union Blvd., Colorado Springs, CO 80918
June 1 - July 29 (every weekday except July 4)
11 a.m. - noon

The Summer Food Service Program, funded by USDA, provides nutritious meals to children and teenagers 0-18. There are no income or registration requirements for participation.

To find other nearby summer meal sites, visit KidsFoodFinder.org.

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suncatcher

Take and Makes for this project (from May 13, 2022) may still be available at area PPLD Libraries!

Supplies and Directions:

Materials we provide:

  • Paper plate
  • Contact paper
  • Yarn

Materials you provide:

  • Natural materials
  • Scissors

Directions:

  1. Go outside and pick up a variety of natural materials.
  2. Cut out the center circle of your plate.
  3. Peel the backing off your contact paper.
  4. Place your contact paper sticky side up on your surface.
  5. Place the outside plate circle over the contact paper.
  6. Arrange your natural materials on the sticky side of your contact paper.
  7. Use the yarn to hang your suncatcher.

Based on https://handsonaswegrow.com/craft-for-toddlers-nature-collage-suncatche…

Pikes Peak Library District established the new public service area of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) in January 2021. With this newer public service and dedicated staff, we can ensure our spaces and programs are welcoming and accessible for every resident. This includes those with disabilities, members of the military and their families, older adults, those of different faiths, people of color, immigrants, LBGTQIA+ individuals, those who live in more rural parts, and many other identities within our county.

Here’s a snapshot of their focus and goals: “Pikes Peak Library District is committed to treating all individuals with respect and dignity by embracing the principles of equity, diversity, and inclusion. We will achieve this by following PPLD’s new vision, mission, and values; ensuring our policies and programs promote the representation and participation of all El Paso County community members - past, present, and future.”

This small team provides EDI-focused services and outreach to our community, along with guidance to staff, to name a few things. For example, the EDI team now directly oversees our accessibility resources, services, and programs for the public. This includes ADA accessibility needs, assistive technology available at our Library locations, and our Library Explorers program that’s open to people of all abilities.

They also provide resources and programs specifically for older adults, so people can avoid isolation and loneliness, learn about Medicare, and find whatever else they need at this stage of life. In addition to this, our EDI team has expanded Library outreach to military families and veterans, as well as the faith-based community. They often collaborate with other entities to ensure anyone seeking support can access what they need.
Thanks to our EDI team and other Library staff, we can fulfill a part of our new mission – cultivating physical, digital, and other spaces for belonging – and being here for everyone in our community.


Interview with Shirley Martinez, PPLD’s Director of Equity, Diversity & Inclusion

This was originally featured in our Winter 2022 issue of the District Discovery magazine, and we’re resharing now to address some of your most common questions.

What is equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI)?

Equity is about making sure individuals are treated equitably, not just in jobs. It could be at the grocery store. It could be at the doctor's office. It could be pay.

Diversity is about story. It's about the things that make up who you are, your experiences, your education, background, where you come from, the things that you do.

Inclusion is about the action. It's about the things that you do to include people in decisions, programs, marches, art… That's what inclusion is about.

EDI is about the story that is told and being equitable in order for people to feel like they belong.

It's about ensuring that everybody has a seat at the table, that they have an outlet for their voice. And this doesn't mean that it stops anyone else from having a voice. It's about having dialogue and being able to have courageous conversations and not be offended. You don't have to like what somebody says. We're not there to make everybody change their minds. We're there to educate and provide tools. Hopefully, they get something from it.

What are some common misconceptions about EDI?

I would say 50% of the people think that EDI is about race and race issues between blacks and whites. But when you dig a little deeper, you understand that it's also about individuals with disabilities. It's about women. It's about LGBT. It's about all the things that make us different.

What goals have you set for EDI initiatives at the Library?

One of them is improved staff perception and giving them meaningful work on how to help the Library move itself into a place of being truly inclusive. If we're open to the public, we need to be open to all.

Another way is continued compliance with ADA [Americans with Disabilities Act], with Title II [which prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in all services, programs, and activities]. We look at equipment, our books, our posters, our facilities… Can people use our systems with JAWS [a computer screen reader program]? Are they able to check out a book at the self-checkout?

We also want to build and strengthen relationships with our patrons and contribute to the Library’s community engagement and outreach. We need to reach out to the military veteran community and the faith-based community.

Also with diversity, we need to look at benchmarking, program measures, and accountability. We need to identify what measures are working.

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water balloon parachute

Can your water balloons survive a big drop? Find out with this experiment.

Supplies and Directions:

  • One balloon
  • Water
  • One plastic shopping bag
  • One rubber band

Directions:

  1. Add water to your balloon, don't fill the balloon, leave lots of room to tie the balloon closed.
  2. Cut the ends of the handles of the bags. Tie or rubber band them to the knotted end of a water balloon
  3. Go outside and drop it from a high place to see if it breaks when it lands.
  4. Test and retest until your balloon breaks.
  5. Try it again with another balloon.
  6. See what else you can attach to your parachute and let drop.

Pikes Peak Library District is excited to announce the call for submissions for All Pikes Peak Writes! All Pikes Peak Writes is PPLD’s annual fiction writing contest for ages 12+ and seeks to highlight writers in our community through one contest. This year’s contest will have three categories for Middle School and High School (ages 12-18), Young Adult (ages 19-24), and Adult (ages 25+). Please see the guidelines, rules for entry, and submission form for each category below.

Submissions will be accepted May 15, 2022, through 9 p.m. on July 15, 2022.

Eligibility:
All Pikes Peak Writes is open to El Paso County residents ages 12+

Judging:
Entries will be judged on quality of writing, use of language, plot development and resolution, believable characters, and correct punctuation, grammar, and spelling.

Awards:
Prizes will be awarded for first, second, and third place entries in each category. We will notify participants in mid-August if they have won an award. All winners will be announced on ppld.org and invited to have their story published in an anthology of winning entries.

Please contact hbuljung@ppld.org or mfortune@ppld.org for questions or more information

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Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month

Celebrate Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month with PPLD!

 

Library Program and Craft: Paper Lei
In celebration of Lei Day and Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month, learn the history and story around the lei as you create your very own. All materials will be included for this one-hour program.



Resources:


Regional History & Genealogy Resources:


Website Links:

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Jewish American Heritage Month

Celebrate Jewish American Heritage Month with PPLD!


Resources


Regional History & Genealogy Resources Archival Collections

Website Links: Jewish American Heritage Month: The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Jewish Americans who have helped form the fabric of American history, culture and society.

International best-selling author Jim Fergus has been named the 2022 recipient of the Frank Waters Award by the Friends of the Pikes Peak Library District. Fergus, a Colorado College graduate, received the award and was the keynote speaker at the annual Literary Awards Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, June 18 at the DoubleTree by Hilton, 1775 East Cheyenne Mountain Blvd.

Fergus’s first novel, “One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd,” was published in 1998. The novel won the 1999 Fiction of the Year Award from the Mountains & Plains Booksellers Association. It has since sold over 700,000 copies in the United States.

Fergus has also published a collection of outdoor articles and essays, titled “The Sporting Road.” In 2005, his second novel, “The Wild Girl: The Notebooks of Ned Giles” set in the 1930’s in Chicago, Arizona, and the Sierra Madres of Mexico, was published. In 2018, he published “The Vengeance of Mothers,” a sequel to his first novel. followed by “Strongheart” in 2021. Fergus divides his time between southern Arizona and France, where he also is a best-selling author.

The 2022 Golden Quill award was also presented at the luncheon. The annual prize, given to a local author or publication, went to John Anderson, former El Paso County sheriff, historian and writer. His works include: “Sherlock Holmes in Little London: 1896 The Missing Year”; “Rankin Scott Kelly: First Sheriff of El Paso County Colorado Territory 1861-1867”; and “Ute Prayer Tees of the Pikes Peak Region.”

Proceeds from the event benefitted Friends, who support library district programs and needs.