What's New!

eLearning with PPLD

Pikes Peak Library District has tools and resources to support you in your education journey this year!

First stop: get your card.

  • Either stop by a PPLD facility to sign up, or print out an application ahead of time to bring with you (located here).
  • OR

  • Apply for a card online!
      • You must live within the PPLD service area
      • You will need proof of your current address and a photo ID
      • If you're 15-years-old or younger, you must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.



Learn more about the Library's response to Covid-19.


Brainfuse

Live Homework Help

Live homework help and skills building online with expert tutors in math, science, social studies, and English, plus writing and reading assistance.


Testing & Education Reference Center

Study Guides and Practice Tests

This database provides study guides and timed practice exams for all major college entrance exams and standardized tests, plus college planning, scholarship search, and career exploration tools.


Databases

These platforms provide high-quality educational content and are fun to explore! Access is free with a valid library card and pin number.
Databases include:

  • Academic Search Premiere: Contains full text for more than 2,000 journals, including more than 1,550 peer-reviewed titles. This multi-disciplinary database covers virtually every area of academic study.
  • Consumer Health Complete:A comprehensive full-text resource for consumer-oriented health content covering all areas of health and wellness from mainstream medicine to the many perspectives of complementary, holistic and integrated medicine.
  • CultureGrams: Includes over 200 reports on countries and cultures and state reports outlining the diversity and history of each U.S. state and the District of Columbia. Designed for upper elementary-aged children
  • Gale Virtual Reference Library: Searches our entire collection of Gale eBooks on a variety of subjects, including history, science, government, and more.
  • Learn on Demand: Interactive online training for Microsoft Office software. Includes Access, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, Windows and Word. New users will need to create an account.
  • Lynda.com: Lynda .com offers online video tutorials to help you learn software, creative, and business skills.
  • Opposing Viewpoints in Context: Explore current events and controversial issues by researching multiple sides of a topic. This database aids students in writing argumentative essays and developing analytical thinking skills.
  • Science Reference Center: Provides easy access to a multitude of full-text, science-oriented content. Designed to meet every student researcher's needs, Science Reference Center contains full text for 732+ science encyclopedias and reference books, 195 periodicals, 519 science videos and other sources.

Online Resource Guides

Librarian-Approved Info on Tons of Topics!

Your source for research assistance, subject guides, and library resources.


Mango Languages

Ready to expand your horizons by learning a new language? Mango Languages features 70 language options, including 21 options for those learning English as a second language. Explore languages from Irish to Punjabi in the comfort of your own home, or download the app to learn on the go! Students can go at their own pace. The courses have been created by expert linguists and native-speaking instructors to ensure that the content is grammatically and conversationally correct, as well as culturally relevant.


Workforce Readiness Training

Get ready to get a job or go to college! Work your way through modules focused on professionalism, communication, social skills, and goal setting to prepare yourself for the next big step in your life. Folks below age 15 should focus on the “basic” training while older youth might find the “intermediate” training more appropriate. Complete the training and pass an assessment to earn 10 hours of volunteer credit!




The Homeschool Hub

The PPLD Homeschool Hub has a wealth of resources and tools to support your learning at home efforts. You can also sign up for their newsletter here. Click on “Resources” to find information on getting started; Colorado homeschool law, online courses, concurrent enrollment, and enrichment programs; tutoring; extracurricular activities; support organizations; and more.


Featured Homeschool Resources

Whether you are homeschooling full- or part-time, or simply looking for ways to enrich your child’s education, the online resources featured in this issue provide a variety of elucidating and engaging possibilities.

  • Learning Heroes
    This site provides parents with a picture of their child’s learning needs along with tools to bolster their academic, social, and emotional development. A “Readiness Check” with short questions about reading or math for grades K - 8 will show you where your student stands. You’ll also find learning aids by subject and grade level, ways to identify a child’s character strengths and areas for development, an idea-packed “Anti-Racism Resources Directory,” and more. It’s also accessible in Spanish!
  • GreatSchools
    This resource helps with developing “Emotional Smarts,” learning issues, building character, college prep, and more. A “What Your Child Should Have Learned” section outlines key academic and social benchmarks typical for grades K - 8 along with specific subject check-ins aligned with Common Core State Standards. Short “Milestones” videos clarify grade level expectations by demonstrating what success looks like in reading, writing, and math in grades K - 12. Parents can also access learning activities, vocab words, worksheets, and more by grade level. It’s also accessible in Spanish!
  • Khan Academy
    This site provides free standards-aligned video tutorials and interactive exercises in math, science, and the humanities from kindergarten through the early years of college. The self-paced lessons are organized to build knowledge one concept at a time. Create a free account to track a student’s progress, chart subject mastery, and support their learning needs. Use Khan Academy to tackle new coursework, fill in gaps for subjects already learned, homework help, or as a fun activity. It’s accessible in numerous languages!
  • Understood
    Understood is aimed at supporting kids with learning and thinking differences, like dyslexia and ADHD, by offering customized, accessible resources and a compassionate community. The “For Families” section organizes articles and resources into general topics: understanding and navigating learning and thinking differences; school and learning issues; socio-emotional development; community, including blogs and discussion groups; and “Through Your Child’s Eyes,” interactive simulations to help parents better understand their child’s world. It’s also accessible in Spanish!
  • Wide Open School
    This site offers engaging, high-quality online learning experiences for kids pre-K - 12. Parents can access the content by subject, or plan a full school day by grade level. Other sections are dedicated to virtual field trips, art and music, physical activity, emotional well-being, English-language learners, learning differences, and more.


For Fun AND Learning!

eLibrary: More than Books!

This is the place to go for thousands of free digital materials. First, you'll need to create an account using your library card number and pin. Some services in the eLibrary include OverDrive (eBooks, eAudios, eVideos), Hoopla ( eMusic, eVideos, eComics, eBooks, eAudios), AudioBookCloud (eAudios), Freading (eBooks), Freegal (eMusic), Kanopy (eVideos), and more.


PPLD Kids

You can find plenty of PPLD resources here! Explore:

  • Homework (search by subject to find databases, recommended websites, and more),
  • Read (access booklists by grade level, genre, online resources, and more),
  • Create (hands-on activities and websites),
  • or Parents & Educators (curated information source for adults).

PPLD Teens

Get homework help, book recommendations, virtual programs, research resources, and more!


TumbleBooks

eBooks for Kids!

This curated database of children’s eBooks offers over 1000 titles for kids in grades K - 6. Included are animated talking picture books, read-along chapter books, National Geographic videos, non-fiction books, literacy puzzles and games, books in Spanish and French, and graphic novels (a fan favorite!). Younger kids will enjoy listening to the stories while perusing the illustrations, while older or more accomplished readers can choose from the collection of read-along books featuring narration, sentence highlighting, and automatic page-turning. Each book is accompanied by a reading level, Lexile level, and grade information, plus an optional quiz. There are no limited check-out times or wait lists, so every item is always available to everyone.

Comments: 0
Pikes Peak Poet Laureate Announced

Commemorating the start of Arts Month in Colorado Springs and the Pikes Peak region, Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) is pleased to announce the region’s first Pikes Peak Poet Laureate since 2017.

Ashley Cornelius is a nationally recognized and award-winning spoken word poet in Colorado. Her poetry has been featured at TEDx Colorado Springs, Pikes Peak Community College, the Colorado Springs Women's March, Denver Public Library, Colorado Nonprofit Association, as well as on many stages. Additionally, she was the 2018 Women of the World Poetry Slam Colorado Springs representative and competed nationally. A winner of multiple poetry Slams in Colorado Springs, Cornelius was also the Colorado Springs Independent Best of Artist in 2019 and was recognized by the Colorado Springs Business Journal as a Rising Star in 2021. She is sought after across the nation for speaking engagements and workshop facilitation utilizing poetry.
Ashley Cornelius
“It is an honor to select Ashley Cornelius to serve as the Pikes Peak Poet Laureate,” said Dustin Booth, project chair and PPLD Manager for Knights of Columbus Hall. “She will be an incredible ambassador for the arts in the Pikes Peak region and her poetry inspires those who witness her work to think deeper about the roles we all play in our community.”

Cornelius was selected through a competitive Poet Laureate application and interview process. The Poet Laureate committee contributed to the selection process and included Molly Wingate, Juan J. Morales, Andy Vick, Michael Ferguson, and Susan Peiffer.

Cornelius’s two-year term will begin late October. As Poet Laureate she will work closely with the Library District to build a literary arts community through poetry by developing an appreciation of written and performance poetry, as well as inspiring and celebrating poetry and poets in the Pikes Peak region with dynamic programs of engagement, advocacy, and education.

“This is an incredible honor, and I am excited to serve as the Pikes Peak Poet Laureate,” said Cornelius. “My intentions are to reach as many people as we can through poetry and storytelling and to be a champion for equity, diversity, and inclusion in our local creative spaces.”

PPLD will host an official inauguration ceremony appointing Cornelius as the Pikes Peak Poet Laureate at a celebration on Sat., Oct. 23 at Knights of Columbus Hall, part of the Penrose Library campus in downtown Colorado Springs. The event will start at 6 p.m. and will feature presentations by a few rising stars in the Colorado Springs poetry community, pieces by previous poet laureates, and a keynote presentation by Cornelius.

Comments: 0
Stroll-a-Story

Walk together and enjoy the benefits of a wonderful children’s book and some physical activity.


Tag us on Facebook @PPLDKids and let us know what you think!

Are you ready? Let’s go!


OCC Spooky Stroll

Fri, Oct. 1 through Sun., Oct. 31, take a spooky stroll in Old Colorado City and read We're Off to Find the Witch's House by Richard Krieb and illustrated by R.W. Alley. Find a page at each location on the map above and head inside - there may be a special treat waiting for you! Finish the story at Old Colorado City Library!


Download a map.

Participating Businesses


Silly Stroll

Be on the lookout for our Silly Stroll at a Library near you in the Library windows or on the lawn! Enjoy time outside with the family doing silly activities, making noise and wiggling around. Maybe you can think of some new silly things to do!


Math Stroll

More interested in math? Check it out!

Comments: 0
All Pikes Peak Makes

Explore the world of making this October with All Pikes Peak Makes!

A maker is someone who creates – to be innovative, to solve problems, to bring something beautiful into the world, or simply to have fun. They have an idea and they bring it to life. Making can encompass just about anything, from high tech to low tech to no tech, from art to fabrication to artistic fabrication, from needles to table saws to software. Join us Mon., Oct. 11 - Sun., Oct. 24 as we celebrate making in the Pikes Peak region – by exploring outer space as well as local maker hubs, tinkering, thinking, and, of course, making!

Celebrate making with us!


Events

All Pikes Peak Makes @ Knights of Columbus Hall
Are you ready to get hands-on with some creative projects? Looking to learn more about creative organizations and resources in our community? Join us for APPM @ KCH!

This year, due to pandemic safety measures, we'll be getting together for a smaller All Pikes Peak Makes event at the newly opened Knights of Columbus Hall. Local creative organizations will bring hands-on projects for the whole family to enjoy. Explore the world of making this October with All Pikes Peak Makes!


MESO – Mobile Earth and Space Observer
The MESO bus is coming to PPLD for All Pikes Peak Makes! MESO is a “science center on wheels" with hands-on educational and research activities focused on earth and space sciences, renewable energy, and scientific instrumentation.

Participants explore the process of science, and in-depth scientific concepts. Scientists-educators engage people directly with scientific tools such as solar and celestial telescopes, spectroscopy, infrared cameras, augmented reality sand table, gravity wells, and much more!


Community Makerspace Tours

  • Monumental Impact
    You know the library offers makerspaces, but did you know there are other great makerspaces in our community as well? Join us for a tour of Monumental Impact, a space designed to help high school students with programs in technology, engineering, and entrepreneurship. Interested in robots? This is the tour for you!

    Drop in at any time during these hours, but the first 20 attendees of this tour will receive an exclusive APPM tote bag with ideas about how to make it your own!


  • Manitou Art Center
    You know the library offers makerspaces, but did you know that we have an amazing new relationship with the Manitou Art Center as well? The Manitou Library is now co-located with the MAC and PPLD cardholders have access to their incredible facilities. Join us for a tour of the Manitou Art Center, which to provides an environment in which artists, tinkerers and collaborators can flourish. Interested in woodworking, metalworking, textiles, or ceramics? The MAC has equipment and space for all of these and much more - this makerspace tour is for you!

    While you’re visiting, be sure to check out the MESO bus in the parking lot! Learn more.

    Drop in at any time during these hours, but the first 20 attendees of this tour will receive an exclusive APPM tote bag with ideas about how to make it your own!


  • Visit a PPLD Makerspace
    Visit a PPLD Makerspace between Mon., Oct. 11 and Sun., Oct. 24 and receive an exclusive APPM tote bag with ideas on how to make it your own.

  • Take and Make: Solar Bug
    Make your own solar powered insect that moves around and makes noise! Cut out your bug, decorate it to the nines, and then make a simple circuit using conductive tape, a solar cell, and a motor.

    Take and Makes will be available beginning on Mon., Oct. 11 at locations TBD. Available while supplies last.



These events are in partnership with Cool Science.

Comments: 0

Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated from Tue., Sept. 15 - Thu., Oct. 15, recognizing the contributions and influence of Hispanic American to the history, culture, and achievements of the United States. PPLD hosts several opportunities to learn and celebrate.


Hispanic Heritage Celebration

Visit community booths, enjoy children’s activities, get a library card, watch dancers from Ballet Folklorico de Barajas and Danzas Folkloricas Panamericans, have a tasty a snack provided by local food trucks, and listen to a Spanish language storytime.

Painted Pottery Take and Make
Available Fri., Sept. 17 at all locations while supplies last.
Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with a fun painted pottery craft. We will provide the terra cotta pot, paint, and pattern and seeds to grow a plant.

Tween Twist Take and Make
Available Fri., Oct. 1 at all locations while supplies last.
Hone your scissors skills by creating Papel picado, small banners made by cutting designs into crepe or tissue paper. For ages 9 - 12.


Resources

Comments: 0
Books Unite Us. Censorship Divides Us.

Books Unite Us. Censorship Divides Us.

“I’m offended”….”How can I explain this to my kid?”….”This isn’t what I believe”….The idea that books that present these challenges should be taken off of the shelves, and the opposing assertion that all knowledge should be available to everyone, is the foundation of librarians’ favorite holiday week: Banned Books Week, Sat., Sept. 26 - Sat., Oct. 2.


Programs and PPLD Resources

Teens Eat: Book-tasting
Get ready to sample books and snacks! You will be introduced to four different Banned Books that will each be paired with a related snack.

Child and Young Adult Reading List


Banned Books

When you read a book or watch a movie, ever think to yourself “I’m offended” or ”How can I explain this to my kid?” or ”This isn’t what I believe”? Those thoughts are common and every library has something that offends someone. Banned Books Week is about keeping materials available for all – even if they offend someone.

The American Library Association honors this tradition by taking the time to educate us all on intellectual freedom. Banned Books Week launched in the 1980s after a rise in challenging and banning controversial materials (including Hop on Pop, by Dr. Seuss).), In short, this is your right to read whatever you want, whether someone else agrees with it or not. So this Banned Books Week, go out and explore without limitations! Read the books that you want to read and find the information that you want to know whether it’s offensive, different, scary, magical, or anywhere in between!


The Top 10 National List

The ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom tracked 156 challenges to library, school, and university materials and services in 2020. Of the 273 books that were targeted, here are the most challenged, along with the reasons cited for censoring the books:

  1. George by Alex Gino
    • Reasons: Challenged, banned, and restricted for LGBTQIA+ content, conflicting with a religious viewpoint, and not reflecting “the values of our community”
  2. Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Reynolds
    • Reasons: Banned and challenged because of author’s public statements, and because of claims that the book contains “selective storytelling incidents” and does not encompass racism against all people
  3. All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely
    • Reasons: Banned and challenged for profanity, drug use, and alcoholism, and because it was thought to promote anti-police views, contain divisive topics, and be “too much of a sensitive matter right now”
  4. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
    • Reasons: Banned, challenged, and restricted because it was thought to contain a political viewpoint and it was claimed to be biased against male students, and for the novel’s inclusion of rape and profanity
  5. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
    • Reasons: Banned and challenged for profanity, sexual references, and allegations of sexual misconduct by the author
  6. Something Happened in Our Town: A Child’s Story About Racial Injustice by Marianne Celano, Marietta Collins, and Ann Hazzard, illustrated by Jennifer Zivoin
    • Reasons: Challenged for “divisive language” and because it was thought to promote anti-police views
  7. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    • Reasons: Banned and challenged for racial slurs and their negative effect on students, featuring a “white savior” character, and its perception of the Black experience
  8. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    • Reasons: Banned and challenged for racial slurs and racist stereotypes, and their negative effect on students
  9. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
    • Reasons: Banned and challenged because it was considered sexually explicit and depicts child sexual abuse
  10. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
    • Reasons: Challenged for profanity, and it was thought to promote an anti-police message

Check out challenged titles at PPLD.


Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) believes in freedom of information for all and does not practice censorship. The selection of Llibrary materials is predicated on the patron's right to read and freedom from censorship by others. Library materials may be controversial and any given item may offend some person. Selections for the Library are made solely on the merits of the material, in relation to the development of a collection that serves the needs and interests of a diverse population.

Community members are always welcome to submit a reconsideration request form for Library materials.

Please see our Challenge Materials Policy for more information.

Comments: 0

Our website will be undergoing a software upgrade in September. The website will look and function the same with some minor exceptions:

  • The main upper navigation menu will be white and ‘on click.’ You will have to click on the menu item to see the flyouts.
  • The red message bar that is currently at the very top of ppld.org pages has been moved down below the search bar. Check here for messages about unexpected closures, technical issues, etc.

PPLD.org software upgrade

  • The Local Authors and the Teens areas of the website have a new look - imitating the rest of the site.
  • The mobile site will more closely resemble the desktop site.

It’s also possible on the day of the upgrade that ppld.org will be temporarily unavailable. Stay tuned!

Comments: 0

The “Latina Voices” program celebrates its 10th anniversary with a special event from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Sept. 25 at Library 21c, 1175 Chapel Hills Drive. Presented by the Friends of the Pikes Peak Library District, the event showcases the successes and talents of southern Colorado Latinas. This year’s presenters include:

  • Adriana Jones Rincon, a local musician and dancer and general manager of the Smokebrush Foundation for the Arts in 2017.
  • Juliana Aragón Fatula, poet and writer, author of The Road I Ride Bleeds, Crazy Chicana in Catholic City, and Red Canyon Falling on Churches (winner of the High Plains Book Award in 2016.)
  • AliciaRose Martinez, Summer Programs & College Access Specialist at Colorado College and co-director of the Mariachi Tigre Music Ensemble at Colorado College.
  • Andreanna Trujillo, this year’s emcee, worked in higher education for more than 20 years – both at UCCS and Colorado College, and as a volunteer for a local non-profit, Parents Challenge.

Doors open at 9:30 a.m. and refreshments will be served. There also will be a sale of books by Hispanic authors and a video with highlights from the past 10 years. The event is free and open to the public. Questions? Call (719) 531-6333, x1461.

Comments: 0

September highlights suicide prevention. The booklist link below has good resources for parents and children.
See also: https://nationaltoday.com/world-suicide-prevention-day/

Comments: 0
STEM: Plastic Cup Microscope

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, Sept. 3, 2021.

Supplies and Directions:

Materials we provide: Plastic cup, plastic sandwich bag, rubber band

Materials you provide: scissors, water, interesting specimens to observe

Directions (see pdf link below for additional step-by-step photos):

  1. Cut a hole in the side of the cup along the bottom. This doesn’t need to be neat. It’s designed as an access point for you to get specimens into the bottom of your cup.
  2. Stretch one layer of the plastic bag over the top of the cup and secure it with a rubber band.
  3. Find a specimen and put it in your cup through the hole. (A specimen is an insect, leaf, flower, etc.)
  4. Pour a small amount of water onto the plastic wrap. You want it to be a small pool.
  5. Look through the water at your specimen. The water has created a lens and magnifies your specimen.
  6. Repeat with other specimens.

How it works: A microscope uses mirrors and lenses to bend light so that an image appears larger than it is. In our microscope, the water creates a convex lens. It bends the light that passes through it and makes the specimen appear to be bigger.

 
Comments: 0

Supplies:

  • TP tube
  • Mylar sheet
  • Straw
  • Cardstock circle
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Tape
  • Markers or other things to decorate

Directions:

  1. If you'd like, decorate your tp tube.
  2. Cut the mylar sheet into 3 equal pieces that fit to make a triangle inside the tube without falling out. Cut them a little bigger to start first. We cut ours 10 cm x 3.6 cm (3.94 inches x 1.42 inches).
  3. Line up the mylar strips with a tiny strip between them. Tape them together. Then tape them together into a triangle. The shiny side is toward the center. Slide the triangle into the tube.
  4. Cut the straw so the bendy end is about 6 inches long. Tape it to the tp tube so the bendy part hangs over the end.
  5. Cut out your cardstock circle. Poke a hole in the center. Decorate the circle using markers, stickers or anything else you have at home.
  6. Place the straw through the hole in the circle. Slide it until the circle is over the bendy part of the straw so it turns easily.

Look into your kaleidoscope and manually turn the circle. You should see lots of changing designs!

kaleidoscope 1kaleidoscope 2kaleidoscope 3kaleidoscope 4

kaleidoscope 5kaleidoscope 6kaleidoscope 7

Comments: 0

The Big Book Sale is back at the East Library! There will be thousands of books and media at rock bottom prices, each $2 or less.

  • Friday, October 1, 2021 from 4 – 7 p.m. MEMBERS ONLY PREVIEW. Memberships available at the door or join online and show your receipt.
  • Saturday, October 2, 2021 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Free admission.
  • Sunday, October 3, 2021 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. $5 BAG DAY. Bags provided by Friends.

Volunteers are always needed. Contact us to schedule a time to volunteer.

Comments: 0
KidsMake: Straw Rockets

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, August 20, 2021. Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/bShFYRZCMW4?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFenhH3jVzKk-QmaHXdAFOBq

Supplies and directions:

Provided in your bag: rocket template, straw, and pipette
From home: markers, scissors, and tape

Step 1
Color your rocket and cut it out.

Step 2
Trim your pipette with scissors so that it fits on the back of your rocket; tape in place with the
opening pointing down.

Step 3
Trim your straw to whatever size you want, put it in your pipette, and you're ready to launch!
Give your straw a big puff of air and watch your rocket fly!

Comments: 0
STEM: Evaporation Art

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries starting this Friday, August 13, 2021. Watch this project at https://youtu.be/zGzv7SBx9Iw

Supplies and Directions:

Materials Included:

  • 4 washable markers
  • A pipette
  • A paintbrush
  • White paper

Materials You Provide:

  • A few crayons of different colors
  • A small glass of water
  • A cookie sheet or other flat board or tray
  • Some scotch tape
  1. Use some scotch tape to tape the corners of a piece of the white paper to a cookie tray or other flat board. This will help to keep your paper from blowing away.
  2. Find a sunny spot in a window or a place outside to set your tray. It should be a spot where the sun will shine on your paper for several hours. Use the pipette to make a puddle of water in the middle of the paper. Make the puddle big enough so that the water almost reaches the sides of the paper. Use a crayon to draw around the shape of the puddle. Be careful to draw around the water, not through it.
  3. Wait an hour or so and check on your puddle. Did the puddle shrink? Did it change shape? Use a different color crayon to draw around the puddle’s new shape.
  4. After another hour or so, check again. Each time you check, your puddle will be smaller and you will need to draw a new line with a different color crayon around the new shape. This process will take some time – at least a few hours - so you can do other things while you wait.
  5. After your puddle is completely dry, you should see rings of different color crayon shapes on your paper. Use the markers to color in between the crayon shapes. You can do this any way you want. Then wet the paintbrush in your glass of water and brush over the marker colors you made on the paper to spread the colors. It will look like a watercolor painting! The water won’t stick to the places where the crayon is, so you will still be able to see the original shapes.

You and the power of the sun have teamed up to make some beautiful Evaporation Art!

Here’s the science behind the project:

Evaporation happens when water, a liquid, turns into vapor, a gas, and rises up. You’ve seen what happens to a puddle after a rainstorm. Does the water stay there forever? No. The heat of the sun causes the water to turn into a vapor. It evaporates, and the puddle disappears. The same thing happens in our project. The little puddle you create will evaporate and shrink when exposed to the heat of the sun until it is gone.

 
Comments: 0
Teens & Tweens: Bam! Pow! Magnets

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area libraries beginning, Friday, August 6, 2021. Be sure to check out Free Comic Book Day on Saturday, August 14!

Materials and Instructions:

  • Scissors (you provide)
  • Bam! and Pow! icons (found on PDF below)
  • Epoxy sticker (clear & round)
  • Magnet with adhesive sticker
  1. Cut out a “Bam!” or “Pow!” icon found in the PDF linked below. There are two of each icon on this sheet in case you make a mistake! Or, cut out a 1" circle and decorate it.
  2. Place your icon face up on the table. Take the backing off the clear plastic epoxy sticker and press the sticky side to the top of the colorful side of the icon. You want to be able to see the icon through the sticker. If there is a piece of plastic on the non-sticky side of the epoxy sticker, peel it off and discard.
  3. If the magnet has a separate adhesive sticker, peel the paper backing off one side of the double-sided adhesive sticker and attach to the magnet. If the adhesive sticker is already attached, skip this step.
  4. Remove the backing from the sticker attached to the magnet and stick the magnet to the back of the paper circle.
  5. Congrats you have a magnet! Repeat for the second magnet.
Comments: 0
Octopus Dance Party

Come dance under the sea with us! Twirl, jump, and jam out with family and friends as we celebrate our underwater friends - you might even see an octopus!

Costumes and dressing up are encouraged.

East Library*

Mobile Library Services

Library 21c*

Penrose Library*

Mobile Library Services

High Prairie Library

Rockrimmon Library*

Cheyenne Mountain Library

*Registration required.

Comments: 0

Coding is fun and very cool. Check out this list of coding books for tweens. Click on link below.

Photo by Marta Wave from Pexels

Comments: 0

The purpose of this survey is to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the use of virtual library services by teen patrons within Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD). The survey is comprised of ten questions and is completely voluntary. It should take five to ten minutes to complete. All data is collected anonymously. Direct any questions or concerns to Philip Krogmeier at pkrogmeier@ppld.org.

English: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ZN8CCGJ

Spanish: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/JNHVZF8

Comments: 0
STEM: Water Balloon Parachute

Can your water balloons survive a big drop? Find out with this experiment.

Supplies:

  • One balloon
  • Water
  • One plastic shopping bag
  • One rubber band

Directions:

  1. Add water to your balloon, don't fill the balloon, leave lots of room to tie the balloon closed.
  2. Cut the ends of the handles of the bags. Tie or rubber band them to the knotted end of a water balloon.
  3. Go outside and drop it from a high place to see if it breaks when it lands.
  4. Test and retest until your balloon breaks.
  5. Try it again with another balloon.

See what else you can attach to your parachute and let drop.

Comments: 0
Colorado Day!

Celebrate Colorado Day Sun., Aug. 1 and other events in August!


Genealogy Basics (Colorado Edition) [Virtual]

Are you interested in researching your genealogy, but aren't sure where to start? Join us for an introduction to basic genealogy research strategies including getting started, organizing research, and selecting and searching for records. In celebration of Colorado Day, this month's Genealogy Basics classes will focus on researching your Colorado ancestors!


Knob Hill Street Art Walking Tours [In-Person]

The Knob Hill neighborhood is home to an extraordinary amount of street art. Tour the neighborhood and see the murals at the street level with the street artists who created the art. Learn about the community focused organization, Knob Hill Urban Art District, that creates the murals. Talk with the artists. Experience the art up close. Snake your way through the alleys of the district to find hidden gems. Don't forget your walking shoes!


Library Explorers: Colorado Springs History [Virtual]

Library Explorers programs are designed for adults of all abilities. Join us to learn more about Colorado Springs history using PPLD's Digital Collections. Bonus points if you can find the cat or dog in these historical photos!


Pikes Peak Regional History Symposium [Virtual]

In a year marking the 150-year anniversary of the founding of Colorado Springs by William Jackson Palmer, Pikes Peak Library District is pleased to offer our 2021 Pikes Peak Regional History Symposium virtually! We are excited to celebrate our city's sesquicentennial with you!


Resources

  • Visit PPLD’s Regional History & Genealogy page to learn how you can research our local history. We have historic photos, manuscripts, books, and more!
  • Have you checked out our digital archive? PPLD's Digital Collections features historic photographs, pamphlets, manuscripts, maps, oral histories, films and more that highlight the rich history of the Pikes Peak region. The materials come from the Special Collections of Pikes Peak Library District, housed in the 1905 Carnegie Library in downtown Colorado Springs.
  • Pikes Peak NewsFinder is our local historical newspaper index. This index contains citations to and scanned images of local news articles and obituaries from the Colorado Springs Gazette and other local newspapers from as early as the 1870s!
  • Need homework help? Check out our Colorado Homework Help page to get started with biographies, databases, and recommended websites.

Booklist


Art

  • Teen Art Contest [Virtual]
    PPLD asked teens in Colorado Springs to create a piece of art that connected their personal story with the history of Colorado Springs in order to celebrate the city’s 150th birthday on Sat., July 31, 2021.
  • Then & Now Photo Exhibit [In-Person]
    • All Month at Library 21c, Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. through August 31.

    Local photographer Mike Pach has recreated historic images from the Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum, Pikes Peak Library District and other archives to reveal both the city’s rich history and great progress.


Comments: 0
KidsMake: 3D Jellyfish

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area libraries beginning, Friday, July 23, 2021. Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/nrhKBIg0sl4?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

Supplies and Directions:

Provided in your bag: a paper bowl, streamers, fishing line, assorted decorative materials (decorative materials vary amongst bags)

From home: glue, markers, tape, other decorative materials (optional)

Step 1
Color and decorate the outside of your bowl. Make sure to leave room to draw some eyes if your jellyfish needs them!

Step 2
Cut your streamers in half longways and glue/tape them to the inside rim of your bowl so they are hanging down.

Step 3
Poke a hole in the middle of your bowl and string your piece of fishing line through it; tape it on the inside so it stays in place.

Step 4
Hang your jellyfish up (you can use a piece of tape to attach the other end of the fishing line) and enjoy your new, colorful friend! Give them a name too!

Comments: 0

Celebrate Arts Month with the Rockrimmon Library! The library is hosting a month-long display of art created by our library patrons.


Call for Art

Drop off your artwork during regular library hours to participate in the art show. All entries must include a completed Exhibit Display Agreement form and be ready to hang. Easels and art hangers will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

You may also submit your art online here.


Art Viewing

  • When: Fri., Oct. 1 through Sat., Oct. 30 during regular library hours
  • Where: Rockrimmon Library

Enjoy our month-long display of art created by our patrons.


Open House

Celebrate and appreciate the works of local artists. Light refreshments provided. No registration required for this free program.

Comments: 0
Take and Make: Macrame Mermaid Tail Keychain

Take and Makes for this project, for ages 9-12, will be available at area PPLD libraries starting Friday, July 16, 2021. Watch the YouTube tutorial here: https://youtu.be/5o6RJm9AMGY

Note: If you are not familiar with macrame knotting, watching the YouTube tutorial is highly recommended. The pdf file below will show all the steps in pictures.

Directions:

  1. Attach the cords to the keychain clasp. Secure each of the 48” pieces of cord to the keychain clasp using larks head knots. To create a larks head knot, fold one of the pieces of cord in half. Hold the cord close to the middle so it makes a little loop. Slip this behind the keychain clasp. Pull the two ends of the cord around the keychain clasp and through the loop and pull tight. Your cord should now be wrapped tightly around the keychain clasp. Repeat for the other two 48” pieces of cord.
  2. Use the safety pin or some tape to secure the clasp to something stable. You are now ready to start knotting!
  3. Tie diagonal double half hitch knots. Take the two pieces of cord on the left. Wrap the right cord (the working cord) around the left cord (the filler cord) and pull the end of the cord through the loop. Pull the knot tight and position it toward the top of the filler cord. Repeat to have two (or a double) knots. The working cord becomes the new filler cord and the cord directly to its right becomes the new working cord. Wrap the working cord around the filler cord and pull the end through the loop. Pull the knot tight and position it slightly lower at a diagonal to the first set of knots. Repeat to create your second double half hitch knot.
  4. On the right, make three diagonal double half hitch knots going down and to the left. Repeat the steps above, only going the opposite direction. This will form a nice V shape.
  5. Continue this process for six more rows (there will be seven all together). You should have two double half hitch knots going from left to right and three going from right to left for each row.
  6. For the eighth row, starting on the left you’ll do the one diagonal double half hitch down and to the right, then you’ll hold both the filler cord AND the working cord from the first knot together and tie the second diagonal double half hitch over them both (down and to the right).
  7. Then switch over to the right side and do the same process. The first diagonal double half hitch down and to the left will be normal. For the second knot, you’ll hold the filler cord and the working cord from the first knot together and tie the knot over them.
  8. Finish with a wrapping knot at the bottom. Grab the 20″ long piece of rope and hold it against the ends in a U shape. Then begin wrapping firmly right under the last row of double half hitch knots. Wrap around four times. Thread the end of the cord you’ve been wrapping with through the loop underneath the wraps (the bottom of the U you made earlier). Then pull the short cord sticking out of the top of the wraps until the loop slides up under the wraps about halfway. Don’t accidentally pull it out of the top! Trim the two ends of the wrapping knot and push them up under the wraps. Knot your thread near the end, leaving a couple inches of tail at the end so that you can tie off your thread when you’re done.
  9. Now for the fun part! Cut the fringe at the bottom in an inverted V shape (like a fish tail, or a mermaid tail in this case). If you have a macrame or pet brush, use that to brush the strands out really well. You can also pick the strands apart to create the fringe. Once it’s brushed out, trim it again back into the upside-down V shape. Optional: If desired, you can spray the fringe tail with a stiffener such as some Aleene’s Stiffen Quik spray to help it hold its shape.
Comments: 0
Great Historical Fiction for Kids

It's Colorado Springs 150th birthday this month! 150 years is a sesquicentennial birthday. To celebrate, PPLD children's staff gathered some great historical fiction for kids. The books touch on several different times and places in the history of our country. Click on the pdf link below to see the booklist.

Comments: 0
Makerspaces are Open!

Starting on Thu., July 1, 3D printers will be available for use during Open Hours through walk-ins and reservations at East Library, Library 21c, Sand Creek Library, and Manitou Springs Library! Learn about all equipment available here.

PPLD Makerspace Equipment is also available now at Manitou Springs Library. Learn more about what's available here.

Visit our 3D Printing LibGuide for more information.

Comments: 0

Pages