What's New!

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Arts Month 2021

Did you know that October is Arts Month? Better yet, do you know what Arts Month is all about? (Click here to check out the Cultural Office of the Pikes Peak Region’s website to learn the history of the initiative!) Arts Month is an opportunity to explore the arts and culture of the Pikes Peak Region, trying out new cultural experiences with friends and family . We’ve pulled together all of our upcoming cultural activities in one easy spot. Find the calendar of PPLD Arts Month events HERE.


#Artober Challenge!

Based on art and artist-based challenges for October, PPLD offers its own twist on the idea with their own challenges. Click here to find the Artober challenges. Use #Artober so we can see what you make!


Programs

  • All Pikes Peak Makes Explore the world of making this October with All Pikes Peak Makes! A maker is someone who creates – to be innovative, to solve problems, to bring something beautiful into the world, or simply to have fun. They have an idea and they bring it to life. Making can encompass just about anything, from high tech to low tech to no tech, from art to fabrication to artistic fabrication, from needles to table saws to software. Join us October 11 - 24 as we celebrate making in the Pikes Peak region – by exploring outer space as well as local maker hubs, tinkering, thinking, and, of course, making!
  • All Pikes Peak Makes at the Knights of Columbus Hall on Fri., Oct. 22 from 4 - 9 p.m. Are you ready to get hands-on with some creative projects? Looking to learn more about creative organizations and resources in our community? This year, due to pandemic safety measures, we'll be getting together for a smaller All Pikes Peak Makes event at the newly opened Knights of Columbus Hall. Local creative organizations will bring hands-on projects for the whole family to enjoy.

Registration required for the programs below:

 


Virtual Playlists

  • Virtual Kids Make Children’s staff from around the district lead an art or make project for kids ages 5 - 12.
  • Virtual Teens Make Need some new craft ideas? PPLD teen librarians have you covered!

Resources

  • Reserve a Pikes Peak Culture Pass to explore museums and attractions in the Pikes Peak region at no cost – all you need is a Library card! By collaborating with local organizations, PPLD provides free admission passes for check out, similar to how you check out an eBook or other electronic resource. The Pikes Peak Culture Pass will increase opportunities for education and cultural learning, creating increased connection between books and hands-on experiences.
  • Explore PPLD’s Free Resources for Home Use or Creative Projects at Home guides for something new to watch, learn, or create.
  • Visit PeakRadar.com to find additional cultural activities happening locally!
  • Don’t forget to use the hashtag #ArtsOctober to share photos of your new cultural experiences on COPPeR’s official Arts Month landing page!
  • Click here for find all the Arts Month programming for the county!
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papelpicado

Take and Makes for this project for ages 9-12 will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, Oct 1, 2021.

 

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month by making papel picado, “punched” or “perforated” paper. This traditional folk art is often made by drawing an intricate design and using a chisel to cut several layers of tissue paper. Because this art form is created using materials that disintegrate in the elements, not many historical pieces remain. Often elaborate, these festive banners are used at many celebrations in Mexico and areas with Hispanic roots and heritage. Use scissors to cut out your own version of this traditional art form.

Supplies and Directions:

Tissue paper, scissors, template (find online or draw), tape (washi or masking)

  1. Find or draw a symmetrical design to use as a template. Check out one of the links below for ideas. Fold the template in half.
  2. Stack two to three pieces of tissue paper in a pile and fold it in half.
  3. Slip the tissue paper inside the folded template so the folded edges are on one side.
  4. Cut out the outside of the template, cutting through the tissue paper inside.
  5. Cut out the inside shapes in the template, folding the template around to gain better access to the different shapes to cut out.
  6. Once the template is entirely cut out, remove the tissue paper pieces and unfold them.
  7. Repeat steps 1-6 with more templates and tissue paper.
  8. Using a long, flat surface, such as a table, unroll a long strip of washi or masking tape, leaving it attached to the roll.
  9. Starting at the end, attach the top of each papel picado (tissue paper design) to the washi or masking tape. Unroll more tape as needed, tearing it off the roll once all papel picado have been attached to the banner.
  10. Fold over any tape hanging over across the top of the banner.
  11. Hang your banner up and enjoy!

Adapted from https://happythought.co.uk/how-to-make-papel-picado/

 

More information about papel picado can be found at https://www.internationalfolkart.org/learn/lesson-plans/papel-picado-(d…

 

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OCC Stroll a Story

Walk together and enjoy the benefits of a wonderful children’s book and some physical activity.
Tag us on Facebook @PPLDKids and let us know what you think! Are you ready? Let’s go!

 


Silly Stroll

Be on the lookout for our Silly Stroll at a Library near you in the Library windows or on the lawn! Enjoy time outside with the family doing silly activities, making noise and wiggling around. Maybe you can think of some new silly things to do!


Math Stroll

More interested in math? Check it out!

Are you expecting and have so many questions? Join Pikes Peak Library District and Nurse Family Partnership for a series of prenatal classes. Classes are every Wednesday at noon. Each week we will explore a different topic and have a Q&A session.

*This is a six week series, if you are interested in any of the other sessions please be sure to register for those as well.

Each session attended earns you an entry for a prize to be given away following the last session. You can earn up to six entries!

  • Oct. 6: Birth Plan, Labor & Delivery, and the First Week
    This session will cover birth plans and alternatives to medicines. We will discuss medications you may encounter in the hospital, the first week after birth, what happens in the hospital, and more!
  • Oct. 13: Postpartum - The First 6 Weeks
    Wonder what life will be like the first six weeks after your baby is born? At this session, we will discuss healing, rest, and mental health in postpartum. Learn about self-care during pregnancy and after baby's arrival, so you can take care of yourself, too!
  • Oct. 20: Sleep and Purple Crying
    Having trouble getting enough rest? Learn techniques to help you and your newborn rest. Discover what the Purple Crying Period is and tools you can use to help calm your baby. Learn about the Best Start Program and how you can get a Best Start Baby Box.
  • Oct. 27: Breastfeeding
    This session will cover breastfeeding how-to's, latching, support, education, and more!
  • Nov. 3: Nutrition and Infant Feeding
    Do you wonder what nutrition looks like during pregnancy and postpartum? We will discuss nutrition for mom and also look at infant feeding. Learn about WIC and the resources it offers.
  • Nov. 10: Early Literacy and Prenatal Yoga
    This week learn about brain development and the five early literacy practices to begin at birth. Then practice a few prenatal moves introduced by a certified yoga instructor. Finally, learn about Peak Vista's First Visitor program.
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Quilt

The homeschool team takes us on a tour of several creative spaces at Pikes Peak Library District, including: Library 21c Studio, MAC - loom and jewelry rooms, and the Library 21c Makerspace. Plus, an interview with a expert quilter plus a sewing lesson for beginners. Check out the booklist link below and the directions for the sewing project.

Check out this video: https://youtu.be/HuqP8-VqK1U?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

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Announce Poet Laureate

Commemorating the start of Arts Month in Colorado Springs and the Pikes Peak region, Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) is pleased to announce the region’s first Pikes Peak Poet Laureate since 2017. Ashley Cornelius is a nationally recognized and award-winning spoken word poet in Colorado. Her poetry has been featured at TEDx Colorado Springs, Pikes Peak Community College, the Colorado Springs Women's March, Denver Public Library, Colorado Nonprofit Association, as well as on many stages. Additionally, she was the 2018 Women of the World Poetry Slam Colorado Springs representative and competed nationally. A winner of multiple poetry Slams in Colorado Springs, Cornelius was also the Colorado Springs Independent Best of Artist in 2019 and was recognized by the Colorado Springs Business Journal as a Rising Star in 2021. She is sought after across the nation for speaking engagements and workshop facilitation utilizing poetry.

Ashley Cornelius

“It is an honor to select Ashley Cornelius to serve as the Pikes Peak Poet Laureate,” said Dustin Booth, project chair and PPLD Manager for Knights of Columbus Hall. “She will be an incredible ambassador for the arts in the Pikes Peak region and her poetry inspires those who witness her work to think deeper about the roles we all play in our community.” Cornelius was selected through a competitive Poet Laureate application and interview process. The Poet Laureate committee contributed to the selection process and included Molly Wingate, Juan J. Morales, Andy Vick, Michael Ferguson, and Susan Peiffer. Cornelius’s two-year term will begin late October. As Poet Laureate she will work closely with the Library District to build a literary arts community through poetry by developing an appreciation of written and performance poetry, as well as inspiring and celebrating poetry and poets in the Pikes Peak region with dynamic programs of engagement, advocacy, and education. “This is an incredible honor, and I am excited to serve as the Pikes Peak Poet Laureate,” said Cornelius. “My intentions are to reach as many people as we can through poetry and storytelling and to be a champion for equity, diversity, and inclusion in our local creative spaces.” PPLD will host an official inauguration ceremony appointing Cornelius as the Pikes Peak Poet Laureate at a celebration on Sat., Oct. 23 at Knights of Columbus Hall, part of the Penrose Library campus in downtown Colorado Springs. The event will start at 6 p.m. and will feature presentations by a few rising stars in the Colorado Springs poetry community, pieces by previous poet laureates, and a keynote presentation by Cornelius.

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DINOvember 2021

Celebrate dinosaurs this DINOvember with PPLD! Check out a Dinosaur Storytime and be on the lookout for dinosaurs in your Library! Find the dinosaur at your Library and go to the desk for a prize!


DINO Programs

Dinosaur Resource Center

Celebrate DINOvember with Pikes Peak Library District by attending the Dinosaur Resource Center program for kids ages 3 - 12! Come and learn about these amazing creatures that roamed the earth thousands of years ago.

 

Take and Make Dinorama

Make a habitat for a tiny dinosaur and decorate it with all kinds of fun supplies! Name your little dino and make sure to read it your favorite stories! For ages 5 - 12, while supplies last.

 

Virtual Puppet Show: Dinosaurs!

  • When: Mon., Nov. 1 - Thu., Dec. 30
  • Where: Virtual

ROAR! Do you want to be a dinosaur? Go back in time and discover the pre-historic steps of the gentle giants, primeval predators and leaping lizards that once stalked the earth. Fascinating dino-facts are revealed as erupting volcanoes, catchy tunes, and life-like puppets make this colossal creation come to life! Presented by the Center for Puppetry Arts. Duration 45 min.


DINOsources

PPLD is excited to announce that patrons will be able to use a certain number of supplies for free when they visit a Library
makerspace. Whether you want to engrave a family photo on the laser cutter, 3D print a replacement part for your vacuum cleaner, or just learn how to use an embroidery machine, there will be materials available for you to use to test out your designs and explore the space.

In every session, you will have access to:

  • $1 worth (20 grams) of 3D printing.*
  • 1 piece of wood for the laser cutter (6”x12”).
  • 5 buttons for the button maker.
  • 1 piece of wood for the CNC.
  • 2 sheets of embroidery backing for the embroidery machine.
  • 1 sheet of vinyl for the Silhouette Cameo or Curio die cutters.

*This amount is calculated from the standard $0.05 per gram rate for printing. Anything over that amount will be charged at the usual $0.05 per gram rate.

PPLD’s makerspaces can be found at:

We hope to see you soon!

Explore the world of making this October with All Pikes Peak Makes! A maker is someone who creates – to be innovative, to solve problems, to bring something beautiful into the world, or simply to have fun. They have an idea and they bring it to life. Making can encompass just about anything, from high tech to low tech to no tech, from art to fabrication to artistic fabrication, from needles to table saws to software. Join us Mon., Oct. 11 - Sun., Oct. 24 as we celebrate making in the Pikes Peak region – by exploring outer space as well as local maker hubs, tinkering, thinking, and, of course, making!

Celebrate making with us!


Events

All Pikes Peak Makes @ Knights of Columbus Hall Are you ready to get hands-on with some creative projects? Looking to learn more about creative organizations and resources in our community? Join us for APPM @ KCH!

This year, due to pandemic safety measures, we'll be getting together for a smaller All Pikes Peak Makes event at the newly opened Knights of Columbus Hall. Local creative organizations will bring hands-on projects for the whole family to enjoy. Explore the world of making this October with All Pikes Peak Makes!
MESO – Mobile Earth and Space Observatory The MESO bus is coming to PPLD for All Pikes Peak Makes! MESO is a “science center on wheels" with hands-on educational and research activities focused on earth and space sciences, renewable energy, and scientific instrumentation.

Participants explore the process of science, and in-depth scientific concepts. Scientists-educators engage people directly with scientific tools such as solar and celestial telescopes, spectroscopy, infrared cameras, augmented reality sand table, gravity wells, and much more!

Community Makerspace Tours

  • Monumental Impact You know the library offers makerspaces, but did you know there are other great makerspaces in our community as well? Join us for a tour of Monumental Impact, a space designed to help high school students with programs in technology, engineering, and entrepreneurship. Interested in robots? This is the tour for you!

    Drop in at any time during these hours, but the first 20 attendees of this tour will receive an exclusive APPM tote bag with ideas about how to make it your own!

  • Manitou Art Center You know the library offers makerspaces, but did you know that we have an amazing new relationship with the Manitou Art Center as well? The Manitou Library is now co-located with the MAC and PPLD cardholders have access to their incredible facilities. Join us for a tour of the Manitou Art Center, which to provides an environment in which artists, tinkerers and collaborators can flourish. Interested in woodworking, metalworking, textiles, or ceramics? The MAC has equipment and space for all of these and much more - this makerspace tour is for you!

    While you’re visiting, be sure to check out the MESO bus in the parking lot! Learn more. Drop in at any time during these hours, but the first 20 attendees of this tour will receive an exclusive APPM tote bag with ideas about how to make it your own!

  • Visit a PPLD Makerspace Visit a PPLD Makerspace between Mon., Oct. 11 and Sun., Oct. 24 and receive an exclusive APPM tote bag with ideas on how to make it your own.
  • Take and Make: Solar Bug Make your own solar powered insect that moves around and makes noise! Cut out your bug, decorate it to the nines, and then make a simple circuit using conductive tape, a solar cell, and a motor. Take and Makes will be available beginning on Mon., Oct. 11 at locations TBD. Available while supplies last.


These events are in partnership with Cool Science.

Books Unite Us. Censorship Divides Us. “I’m offended”….”How can I explain this to my kid?”….”This isn’t what I believe”….The idea that books that present these challenges should be taken off of the shelves, and the opposing assertion that all knowledge should be available to everyone, is the foundation of librarians’ favorite holiday week: Banned Books Week, Sat., Sept. 26 - Sat., Oct. 2.


Programs and PPLD Resources

Teens Eat: Book-tasting Get ready to sample books and snacks! You will be introduced to four different Banned Books that will each be paired with a related snack. Child and Young Adult Reading List


Banned Books

When you read a book or watch a movie, ever think to yourself “I’m offended” or ”How can I explain this to my kid?” or ”This isn’t what I believe”? Those thoughts are common and every library has something that offends someone. Banned Books Week is about keeping materials available for all – even if they offend someone. The American Library Association honors this tradition by taking the time to educate us all on intellectual freedom. Banned Books Week launched in the 1980s after a rise in challenging and banning controversial materials (including Hop on Pop, by Dr. Seuss).), In short, this is your right to read whatever you want, whether someone else agrees with it or not. So this Banned Books Week, go out and explore without limitations! Read the books that you want to read and find the information that you want to know whether it’s offensive, different, scary, magical, or anywhere in between!


The Top 10 National List The ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom tracked 156 challenges to library, school, and university materials and services in 2020. Of the 273 books that were targeted, here are the most challenged, along with the reasons cited for censoring the books:

  1. George by Alex Gino
    • Reasons: Challenged, banned, and restricted for LGBTQIA+ content, conflicting with a religious viewpoint, and not reflecting “the values of our community”
  2. Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Reynolds
    • Reasons: Banned and challenged because of author’s public statements, and because of claims that the book contains “selective storytelling incidents” and does not encompass racism against all people
  3. All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely
    • Reasons: Banned and challenged for profanity, drug use, and alcoholism, and because it was thought to promote anti-police views, contain divisive topics, and be “too much of a sensitive matter right now”
  4. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
    • Reasons: Banned, challenged, and restricted because it was thought to contain a political viewpoint and it was claimed to be biased against male students, and for the novel’s inclusion of rape and profanity
  5. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
    • Reasons: Banned and challenged for profanity, sexual references, and allegations of sexual misconduct by the author
  6. Something Happened in Our Town: A Child’s Story About Racial Injustice by Marianne Celano, Marietta Collins, and Ann Hazzard, illustrated by Jennifer Zivoin
    • Reasons: Challenged for “divisive language” and because it was thought to promote anti-police views
  7. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    • Reasons: Banned and challenged for racial slurs and their negative effect on students, featuring a “white savior” character, and its perception of the Black experience
  8. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    • Reasons: Banned and challenged for racial slurs and racist stereotypes, and their negative effect on students
  9. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
    • Reasons: Banned and challenged because it was considered sexually explicit and depicts child sexual abuse
  10. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
    • Reasons: Challenged for profanity, and it was thought to promote an anti-police message

Check out challenged titles at PPLD.


Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD) believes in freedom of information for all and does not practice censorship. The selection of Library materials is predicated on the patron's right to read and freedom from censorship by others. Library materials may be controversial and any given item may offend some person. Selections for the Library are made solely on the merits of the material, in relation to the development of a collection that serves the needs and interests of a diverse population. Community members are always welcome to submit a reconsideration request form for Library materials. Please see our Challenge Materials Policy for more information.

Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated from Tue., Sept. 15 - Thu., Oct. 15, recognizing the contributions and influence of Hispanic American to the history, culture, and achievements of the United States. PPLD hosts several opportunities to learn and celebrate.


Hispanic Heritage Celebration

Visit community booths, enjoy children’s activities, get a library card, watch dancers from Ballet Folklorico de Barajas and Danzas Folkloricas Panamericans, have a tasty a snack provided by local food trucks, and listen to a Spanish language storytime. Painted Pottery Take and Make Available Fri., Sept. 17 at all locations while supplies last. Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with a fun painted pottery craft. We will provide the terra cotta pot, paint, and pattern and seeds to grow a plant. Tween Twist Take and Make Available Fri., Oct. 1 at all locations while supplies last. Hone your scissors skills by creating Papel picado, small banners made by cutting designs into crepe or tissue paper. For ages 9 - 12.


Resources

September highlights suicide prevention. The booklist link below has good resources for parents and children.
See also: https://nationaltoday.com/world-suicide-prevention-day/

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, Sept. 3, 2021.

Supplies and Directions:

Materials we provide: Plastic cup, plastic sandwich bag, rubber band

Materials you provide: scissors, water, interesting specimens to observe

Directions (see pdf link below for additional step-by-step photos):

  1. Cut a hole in the side of the cup along the bottom. This doesn’t need to be neat. It’s designed as an access point for you to get specimens into the bottom of your cup.
  2. Stretch one layer of the plastic bag over the top of the cup and secure it with a rubber band.
  3. Find a specimen and put it in your cup through the hole. (A specimen is an insect, leaf, flower, etc.)
  4. Pour a small amount of water onto the plastic wrap. You want it to be a small pool.
  5. Look through the water at your specimen. The water has created a lens and magnifies your specimen.
  6. Repeat with other specimens.

How it works: A microscope uses mirrors and lenses to bend light so that an image appears larger than it is. In our microscope, the water creates a convex lens. It bends the light that passes through it and makes the specimen appear to be bigger.

 

Supplies:

  • TP tube
  • Mylar sheet
  • Straw
  • Cardstock circle
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Tape
  • Markers or other things to decorate

Directions:

  1. If you'd like, decorate your tp tube.
  2. Cut the mylar sheet into 3 equal pieces that fit to make a triangle inside the tube without falling out. Cut them a little bigger to start first. We cut ours 10 cm x 3.6 cm (3.94 inches x 1.42 inches).
  3. Line up the mylar strips with a tiny strip between them. Tape them together. Then tape them together into a triangle. The shiny side is toward the center. Slide the triangle into the tube.
  4. Cut the straw so the bendy end is about 6 inches long. Tape it to the tp tube so the bendy part hangs over the end.
  5. Cut out your cardstock circle. Poke a hole in the center. Decorate the circle using markers, stickers or anything else you have at home.
  6. Place the straw through the hole in the circle. Slide it until the circle is over the bendy part of the straw so it turns easily.

Look into your kaleidoscope and manually turn the circle. You should see lots of changing designs!

kaleidoscope 1kaleidoscope 2kaleidoscope 3kaleidoscope 4

kaleidoscope 5kaleidoscope 6kaleidoscope 7

The Friends of the PPLD holds two big book sales per year, typically in March and October.

Tentative dates for 2022 are

  • March 11, 12 and 13
  • October 7, 8 and 9

Watch this space for details!

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries beginning Friday, August 20, 2021. Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/bShFYRZCMW4?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFenhH3jVzKk-QmaHXdAFOBq

Supplies and directions:

Provided in your bag: rocket template, straw, and pipette
From home: markers, scissors, and tape

Step 1
Color your rocket and cut it out.

Step 2
Trim your pipette with scissors so that it fits on the back of your rocket; tape in place with the
opening pointing down.

Step 3
Trim your straw to whatever size you want, put it in your pipette, and you're ready to launch!
Give your straw a big puff of air and watch your rocket fly!

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area PPLD libraries starting this Friday, August 13, 2021. Watch this project at https://youtu.be/zGzv7SBx9Iw

Supplies and Directions:

Materials Included:

  • 4 washable markers
  • A pipette
  • A paintbrush
  • White paper

Materials You Provide:

  • A few crayons of different colors
  • A small glass of water
  • A cookie sheet or other flat board or tray
  • Some scotch tape
  1. Use some scotch tape to tape the corners of a piece of the white paper to a cookie tray or other flat board. This will help to keep your paper from blowing away.
  2. Find a sunny spot in a window or a place outside to set your tray. It should be a spot where the sun will shine on your paper for several hours. Use the pipette to make a puddle of water in the middle of the paper. Make the puddle big enough so that the water almost reaches the sides of the paper. Use a crayon to draw around the shape of the puddle. Be careful to draw around the water, not through it.
  3. Wait an hour or so and check on your puddle. Did the puddle shrink? Did it change shape? Use a different color crayon to draw around the puddle’s new shape.
  4. After another hour or so, check again. Each time you check, your puddle will be smaller and you will need to draw a new line with a different color crayon around the new shape. This process will take some time – at least a few hours - so you can do other things while you wait.
  5. After your puddle is completely dry, you should see rings of different color crayon shapes on your paper. Use the markers to color in between the crayon shapes. You can do this any way you want. Then wet the paintbrush in your glass of water and brush over the marker colors you made on the paper to spread the colors. It will look like a watercolor painting! The water won’t stick to the places where the crayon is, so you will still be able to see the original shapes.

You and the power of the sun have teamed up to make some beautiful Evaporation Art!

Here’s the science behind the project:

Evaporation happens when water, a liquid, turns into vapor, a gas, and rises up. You’ve seen what happens to a puddle after a rainstorm. Does the water stay there forever? No. The heat of the sun causes the water to turn into a vapor. It evaporates, and the puddle disappears. The same thing happens in our project. The little puddle you create will evaporate and shrink when exposed to the heat of the sun until it is gone.

 

Take and Makes for this project will be available at area libraries beginning, Friday, August 6, 2021. Be sure to check out Free Comic Book Day on Saturday, August 14!

Materials and Instructions:

  • Scissors (you provide)
  • Bam! and Pow! icons (found on PDF below)
  • Epoxy sticker (clear & round)
  • Magnet with adhesive sticker
  1. Cut out a “Bam!” or “Pow!” icon found in the PDF linked below. There are two of each icon on this sheet in case you make a mistake! Or, cut out a 1" circle and decorate it.
  2. Place your icon face up on the table. Take the backing off the clear plastic epoxy sticker and press the sticky side to the top of the colorful side of the icon. You want to be able to see the icon through the sticker. If there is a piece of plastic on the non-sticky side of the epoxy sticker, peel it off and discard.
  3. If the magnet has a separate adhesive sticker, peel the paper backing off one side of the double-sided adhesive sticker and attach to the magnet. If the adhesive sticker is already attached, skip this step.
  4. Remove the backing from the sticker attached to the magnet and stick the magnet to the back of the paper circle.
  5. Congrats you have a magnet! Repeat for the second magnet.

Come dance under the sea with us! Twirl, jump, and jam out with family and friends as we celebrate our underwater friends - you might even see an octopus!

Costumes and dressing up are encouraged.

East Library*

Mobile Library Services

Library 21c*

Penrose Library*

Mobile Library Services

High Prairie Library

Rockrimmon Library*

Cheyenne Mountain Library

*Registration required.

Coding is fun and very cool. Check out this list of coding books for tweens. Click on link below.

Photo by Marta Wave from Pexels

The purpose of this survey is to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the use of virtual library services by teen patrons within Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD). The survey is comprised of ten questions and is completely voluntary. It should take five to ten minutes to complete. All data is collected anonymously. Direct any questions or concerns to Philip Krogmeier at pkrogmeier@ppld.org.

English: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ZN8CCGJ

Spanish: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/JNHVZF8

Can your water balloons survive a big drop? Find out with this experiment.

Supplies:

  • One balloon
  • Water
  • One plastic shopping bag
  • One rubber band

Directions:

  1. Add water to your balloon, don't fill the balloon, leave lots of room to tie the balloon closed.
  2. Cut the ends of the handles of the bags. Tie or rubber band them to the knotted end of a water balloon.
  3. Go outside and drop it from a high place to see if it breaks when it lands.
  4. Test and retest until your balloon breaks.
  5. Try it again with another balloon.

See what else you can attach to your parachute and let drop.

Celebrate Colorado Day Sun., Aug. 1 and other events in August!


Genealogy Basics (Colorado Edition) [Virtual]

Are you interested in researching your genealogy, but aren't sure where to start? Join us for an introduction to basic genealogy research strategies including getting started, organizing research, and selecting and searching for records. In celebration of Colorado Day, this month's Genealogy Basics classes will focus on researching your Colorado ancestors!


Knob Hill Street Art Walking Tours [In-Person]

The Knob Hill neighborhood is home to an extraordinary amount of street art. Tour the neighborhood and see the murals at the street level with the street artists who created the art. Learn about the community focused organization, Knob Hill Urban Art District, that creates the murals. Talk with the artists. Experience the art up close. Snake your way through the alleys of the district to find hidden gems. Don't forget your walking shoes!


Library Explorers: Colorado Springs History [Virtual]

Library Explorers programs are designed for adults of all abilities. Join us to learn more about Colorado Springs history using PPLD's Digital Collections. Bonus points if you can find the cat or dog in these historical photos!


Saturday, Aug. 28 from 10 - 11:30 a.m. In a year marking the 150-year anniversary of the founding of Colorado Springs by William Jackson Palmer, Pikes Peak Library District is pleased to offer our 2021 Pikes Peak Regional History Symposium virtually! We are excited to celebrate our city's sesquicentennial with you!


Resources

  • Visit PPLD’s Regional History & Genealogy page to learn how you can research our local history. We have historic photos, manuscripts, books, and more!
  • Have you checked out our digital archive? PPLD's Digital Collections features historic photographs, pamphlets, manuscripts, maps, oral histories, films and more that highlight the rich history of the Pikes Peak region. The materials come from the Special Collections of Pikes Peak Library District, housed in the 1905 Carnegie Library in downtown Colorado Springs.
  • Pikes Peak NewsFinder is our local historical newspaper index. This index contains citations to and scanned images of local news articles and obituaries from the Colorado Springs Gazette and other local newspapers from as early as the 1870s!
  • Need homework help? Check out our Colorado Homework Help page to get started with biographies, databases, and recommended websites.

Booklist


Art

  • Teen Art Contest [Virtual] PPLD asked teens in Colorado Springs to create a piece of art that connected their personal story with the history of Colorado Springs in order to celebrate the city’s 150th birthday on Sat., July 31, 2021.
  • Then & Now Photo Exhibit [In-Person]
    • All Month at Library 21c, Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. through August 31.

    Local photographer Mike Pach has recreated historic images from the Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum, Pikes Peak Library District and other archives to reveal both the city’s rich history and great progress.


Take and Makes for this project will be available at area libraries beginning, Friday, July 23, 2021. Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/nrhKBIg0sl4?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu

Supplies and Directions:

Provided in your bag: a paper bowl, streamers, fishing line, assorted decorative materials (decorative materials vary amongst bags)

From home: glue, markers, tape, other decorative materials (optional)

Step 1
Color and decorate the outside of your bowl. Make sure to leave room to draw some eyes if your jellyfish needs them!

Step 2
Cut your streamers in half longways and glue/tape them to the inside rim of your bowl so they are hanging down.

Step 3
Poke a hole in the middle of your bowl and string your piece of fishing line through it; tape it on the inside so it stays in place.

Step 4
Hang your jellyfish up (you can use a piece of tape to attach the other end of the fishing line) and enjoy your new, colorful friend! Give them a name too!

Take and Makes for this project, for ages 9-12, will be available at area PPLD libraries starting Friday, July 16, 2021. Watch the YouTube tutorial here: https://youtu.be/5o6RJm9AMGY

Note: If you are not familiar with macrame knotting, watching the YouTube tutorial is highly recommended. The pdf file below will show all the steps in pictures.

Directions:

  1. Attach the cords to the keychain clasp. Secure each of the 48” pieces of cord to the keychain clasp using larks head knots. To create a larks head knot, fold one of the pieces of cord in half. Hold the cord close to the middle so it makes a little loop. Slip this behind the keychain clasp. Pull the two ends of the cord around the keychain clasp and through the loop and pull tight. Your cord should now be wrapped tightly around the keychain clasp. Repeat for the other two 48” pieces of cord.
  2. Use the safety pin or some tape to secure the clasp to something stable. You are now ready to start knotting!
  3. Tie diagonal double half hitch knots. Take the two pieces of cord on the left. Wrap the right cord (the working cord) around the left cord (the filler cord) and pull the end of the cord through the loop. Pull the knot tight and position it toward the top of the filler cord. Repeat to have two (or a double) knots. The working cord becomes the new filler cord and the cord directly to its right becomes the new working cord. Wrap the working cord around the filler cord and pull the end through the loop. Pull the knot tight and position it slightly lower at a diagonal to the first set of knots. Repeat to create your second double half hitch knot.
  4. On the right, make three diagonal double half hitch knots going down and to the left. Repeat the steps above, only going the opposite direction. This will form a nice V shape.
  5. Continue this process for six more rows (there will be seven all together). You should have two double half hitch knots going from left to right and three going from right to left for each row.
  6. For the eighth row, starting on the left you’ll do the one diagonal double half hitch down and to the right, then you’ll hold both the filler cord AND the working cord from the first knot together and tie the second diagonal double half hitch over them both (down and to the right).
  7. Then switch over to the right side and do the same process. The first diagonal double half hitch down and to the left will be normal. For the second knot, you’ll hold the filler cord and the working cord from the first knot together and tie the knot over them.
  8. Finish with a wrapping knot at the bottom. Grab the 20″ long piece of rope and hold it against the ends in a U shape. Then begin wrapping firmly right under the last row of double half hitch knots. Wrap around four times. Thread the end of the cord you’ve been wrapping with through the loop underneath the wraps (the bottom of the U you made earlier). Then pull the short cord sticking out of the top of the wraps until the loop slides up under the wraps about halfway. Don’t accidentally pull it out of the top! Trim the two ends of the wrapping knot and push them up under the wraps. Knot your thread near the end, leaving a couple inches of tail at the end so that you can tie off your thread when you’re done.
  9. Now for the fun part! Cut the fringe at the bottom in an inverted V shape (like a fish tail, or a mermaid tail in this case). If you have a macrame or pet brush, use that to brush the strands out really well. You can also pick the strands apart to create the fringe. Once it’s brushed out, trim it again back into the upside-down V shape. Optional: If desired, you can spray the fringe tail with a stiffener such as some Aleene’s Stiffen Quik spray to help it hold its shape.