What's New!

We hope you enjoy the 23rd edition of Stone Soup, published by the Adult Education Department of Pikes Peak Library District.

These stories are written by adult participants and volunteers. They are offered as submitted.

SUPPLIES AND INGREDIENTS:

  • ½ cup 49 Volume Hydrogen Peroxide (*3% solution, first aid quality, will work … it produces a smaller reaction)
  • 1 TBSP liquid dish soap
  • 1 packet (1 TBSP) Active Dry Yeast
  • 4 TBSP warm water
  • Plastic Cup for mixing yeast and water
  • Food coloring
  • Plastic soda bottle (*16 oz. - 1 liter)
  • Washable or protected work surface
  • Foil Tray with high sides and/or Larger cookie sheet or tray with sides
  • Funnel (optional)
  • *Safety goggles (*or … ski/snow goggles, swim goggles) … for general eye protection!

DIRECTIONS:

To make up a batch of hippopotamus toothpaste …

  1. Place the soda bottle in your tray(s) … on a washable, protected surface.
  2. Pour 150 ml (½ cup) of 40 Volume Hydrogen Peroxide into the soda bottle.
  3. (You might want to use a funnel for this!)

  4. Add 1 tablespoon of liquid dishwashing soap to the bottle.
  5. Pour the packet of yeast into the small cup.
  6. Pour 4 tablespoons of warm water over the yeast.
  7. Carefully swirl the cup around to further mix the yeast and water. *It should be the consistency of melted ice cream. Allow about 30 seconds. Add a bit more warm water, if needed.
  8. Dribble several stripes of food coloring down the inside of the soda bottle. This should produce stripes, just like you might see in real toothpaste.
  9. Pour the yeast solution into the soda bottle … and stand back! Watch the mixture expand and foam up.

*Once the chemical reaction is complete, you should have (mostly) just soapy water and yeast. However, if you used the Volume 40 product, and some of the peroxide was unreached in the experiment, it could irritate skin and eyes. For that reason, it’s
recommended that you don’t play with the foam! And DON’T BRUSH ANY TEETH WITH THIS FOAM!

How It Works …

Each tiny foam bubble in this chemical reaction is filled with oxygen. The yeast is a catalyst, a substance that speeds up a reaction. It quickly broke apart the oxygen from the hydrogen peroxide … and that created lots and lots of bubbles! Your experiment not only created bubbles, but also heat … that makes it an EXOTHERMIC reaction.

Clean Up …

It’s safe to use a sponge to wipe up foam from your table surface, and just wash the remaining liquid and foam from the bottle and tray down the sink drain.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/N91i9ih62ZM?list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5SmuE8zkwQFmu


Supplies:

  • Watercolors
  • Cup of water
  • Paint brush
  • Pencil
  • Black crayon or oil pastel
  • White watercolor paper or heavy cardstock
  • Black cardstock or construction paper
  • White school glue
  • Glue stick
  • Optional: popsicle stick or toothpicks to spread glue


Directions:

Oil Pastel & Glue Watercolor Stained Glass

  1. Lightly draw a stained-glass design with pencil on your white paper.
  2. Outline the stained-glass design with black pastel or crayon.
  3. Working section by section, wet a section of your design with a paintbrush and plain water. Dab watercolor in that section. Feel free to mix colors.
  4. Repeat for each section of your design, wetting the paper first, before adding paint.
  5. Let your design dry.
  6. Outline each section of your design with glue, inside the black lines.
  7. Spread glue in each section.
  8. Let your project dry.
  9. Finished!

Collage-style Stained Glass

  1. You will need a sheet of black cardstock or construction paper to be the background of your final project.
  2. Lightly draw a stained-glass design with pencil on your white watercolor paper.
  3. Working section by section, wet a section of your design with a paintbrush and plain water. Dab watercolor in that section. Feel free to mix colors.
  4. Repeat for each section of your design, wetting the paper first, before adding paint.
  5. Let your design dry.
  6. Cut out each section of your design.
  7. Lay out your cutout pieces on the black paper.
  8. Once you like the arrangement, glue down each piece to the black paper with a glue stick.
  9. Finished!

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vu2UYBh1G3w&list=PLxg4vmuqrAtckvp9eurSG…

SUPPLIES:

  • Coffee or Oats Can (empty)
  • Thick Rubber Bands
  • Medium / Large Hex Nut
  • Paper Clips (Large and Small)
  • Nail / Hammer
  • Screwdriver
  • Tape
  • Pencil (*optional)
  • Colored paper, tape, and stickers for decoration (*optional)

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Poke a hole in the center of the coffee / oats can top and bottom using a hammer and nail.
  2. Enlarge the hole by tapping a screwdriver through the hole with a hammer.
  3. Tape your rubber band to the top of the large nut. Make sure it’s centered and very secure! (*Depending on the size of your can, you may need to knot two bands together so that there’s not too much tension on them.)
  4. Open up a small paper clip and thread it through one loop of the rubber band. This will be your “needle.”
  5. From the inside of the can, very carefully “thread” the paper clip (with the rubber band attached) through the hole in the bottom of the can. There may be sharp edges, so be careful! Slip a large paper clip through the rubber band loop to secure it in place. Remove the paper clip “needle.”
  6. Place the paper clip “needle” through the remaining loop of the rubber band and carefully pull it through the hole in the coffee / oats can lid. (If the hex nut has moved closer to one side of the rubber band, move it back so that it hangs on the center of the can when stretched.) (*If necessary, place the pencil between the lid and can to temporarily hold everything in place.)
  7. Slip another large paper clip through the rubber band loop to secure it in place. Remove the paper clip “needle” and the pencil. Make sure the lid is attached securely to the can!
  8. If you’d like, decorate your can with colored paper, tape, and stickers. Time for testing! On a flat, smooth surface, gently roll your can away from you. Just before it mysteriously begins to roll back, summon your super powers and call the can back to you. A little “hocus pocus” or “abracadabra” will convince your audience of the magic.

*Troubleshooting : Be sure to use thick rubber bands that will store up enough energy to cause the can to roll back to you. Also check that your hex nut is not touching the side of the can. If it is, use a shorter rubber band or knot your rubber band. If just one band is too short and tight, knot two rubber bands together. You can also thread an extra hex nut onto the outside top and bottom of the can as spacers if your rubber band(s) are too long. Experiment and you’ll get it just right.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/Hk1OthEqSfs

Supplies:

  • Boxes
  • Paper
  • Any random materials – bottle caps, beads, egg cartons, cds, etc.
  • Scissors
  • Adhesive – glue, stickers, etc.

Directions:

Use these found, recycled items to make your own creation.

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/Zc1PUl5WCSw

Supplies:

  • One plastic bottle along with its lid, about the size of a disposable water bottle (it can be a drink bottle, shampoo bottle, catsup bottle, mustard bottle, or any other clean, plastic bottle.) You can experiment with bottles of different shapes and sizes!
  • Two chopsticks, new pencils, sturdy skewers, or any other straight sticks of equal size; they must be long enough to fit at least halfway along the edge of your bottle and then hang off the end by 4 to 5 inches.
  • Thick foam board OR plastic carton(like a whipped cream tub or kitchen wipes container) OR two disposable plastic spoons
  • Rubber bands of different sizes
  • Duct tape or packing tape
  • Scissors
  • Paper
  • Ruler
  • Permanent marker

Directions:

  1. Line up your two sticks on opposite sides and along the length of your clean bottle; tape into place using the duct tape or packing tape (or use rubber bands if you have no tape.)
  2. Slide a rubber band over the ends of the sticks. Your rubber band should be taut without falling off but not so tight that it bends your sticks inward. If your rubber band is too big, try doubling it. It helps to loop the rubber band around each stick so it doesn’t fall off.
  3. Trace and cut a 2 inch X 3 inch template from the paper. Then use the paper template to trace 4 rectangles on the sides, bottom, or lid of a plastic container and cut them out.* The plastic should be soft enough to bend. Bend each piece in half; then use narrow pieces of duct tape to hold the pieces together with the curves flaring in opposite directions and all the bends in the middle.
  4. Slide your curved, taped plastic carton pieces or your taped spoons or your joined foam pieces between the sides of the rubber band. This is your paddle! At this point, you can tape the paddle to the rubber band.
  5. Try it out! You can sail your paddle boat in the bathtub, in a pond or quiet stream, or in a swimming or kiddie pool. Wind the paddle within the rubber band. Do it several times, but don’t wind it so much that it snaps. With the paddle still wound, set your boat gently in the water and let it go!

(Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/aFYJ9Aga7VY?list=PLxg4vmuqrAte4QgWzVQ7oInsSnnMkwcil)

* Caution: Some plastics become sharp when cut. Get an adult’s help if you need it!
Alternate method: Using a wire cutter or strong scissors, trim the handles of two plastic spoons so that they are 2 ½ inches long; use a narrow piece of duct tape to hold the spoons together along the short handle with one spoon facing up and one spoon facing down.
Second alternate method: Cut two 3 inch squares out of thick foam board and cut a slit just to the middle of each so that they can slide together.

The Science behind this Project:

The wound rubber band stores energy. The more you wind it the more energy is stored. The term for stored energy is “potential energy.” When you release the rubber band, the “potential energy” is converted into “kinetic energy,” or the energy of motion.

More experimentation:

Does the boat go faster or slower if the paddle is moved closer to the boat?
Does the boat go backwards if the paddle is wound in the other direction?
Does a big boat go faster or slower than a small boat?
When your boat is in the water, can you spot other forms of kinetic energy caused by the boat’s motion?
Can you think of other examples of potential and kinetic energy?

More ideas:

Make a balloon powered car
Make a rubber band helicopter

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Harvest festival blog 2021

High Prairie Library's Harvest Festival returns in 2021 with a mix of virtual, passive, and live events celebrating the high plains!

BONUS: High Prairie Friends Brown Bag Book Sale Sat., Oct. 16 from 1 to 5 p.m.!

 

You can also contribute to our community cookbook and share your harvest with us!


Live Events

Colorful Leaf Rubbings for Children

Create colorful leaf prints using natural elements, crayons and water colors. For ages 5 and up.

 

Pumpkin Chalkboards for Teens

Teens can celebrate Harvest Festival by creating and decorating their own pumpkin-shaped chalkboard.

 

Pumpkin Decorating and DIY Fall Scented Candles (18+)

Come decorate a pumpkin and make a spice-scented candle for autumn! We provide the wax, wick, scent and heat as well as one candle tin per participant.


Take and Makes

  • Fall Beaded Bracelet (18+)
  • Origami Lucky Stars
  • Pie Piece Banner

History of High Prairie Library

High Prairie Library opened in 2010, bringing a permanent library facility to the Eastern Plains of Colorado while becoming a model for library sustainability. Paid for in part by a U.S. Department of Transportation Congestion Mitigation Air Quality Improvement Program grant, the 6,000-square-foot building in Falcon contains many eco-friendly features. “We have a geothermal pump, low flow plumbing fixtures, and large overhangs that reduce glare and solar heat gain in the summer, but also allow sunbeams in the winter,” explains High Prairie Library Manager Liz Willhoff. “The landscape was designed using native plants, and we have beautiful beetle kill pine inside.” The Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment’s Environmental Leadership Program (ELP) has named High Prairie Library a Gold Partner! They achieved silver status last year, but have earned their gold status by creating an Environmental Management System (EMS). Their EMS helps High Prairie define their scope, set goals, track progress, and have accountability in their systems.

High Prairie Library: The Marriage of Beauty and Sustainable Design from PPLD TV on Vimeo.

The Library, located on land donated by Farmers State Bank, is also home to a garden and a seed library. In addition to these sustainable features, High Prairie Library provides library service to residents of Falcon, Peterson Air Force Base, Banning Lewis Ranch, Black Forest, and the Eastern Plains. Despite the broad service area, “High Prairie has a close community feel and you often know your patrons by name,” says Willhoff. Perhaps the Library’s greatest resource is its staff, which has become a vibrant team. “Staff here feels more like a work family and everyone is very supportive,” says Willhoff. “Everyone has a strong work ethic and jumps in when and wherever needed.” “Liz has done a really excellent job in engaging the High Prairie and Calhan communities,” adds Hillary Dodge, PPLD’s Director of the North Region. “She and her team attend a number of community events and meetings, and they are active in local schools and community organizations, as well. Not only are they trying to remind folks about their amazing neighborhood library, but they are also offering support and resources as library professionals.”

 

Supplies:

  • 8 ½ x11” sheets of colored cardstock or heavyweight construction paper
  • Scissors
  • Colored dot stickers or other small stickers- optional
  • Scraps of colorful/decorative papers- optional
  • Hole punch
  • Glue stick

Directions:

  1. Fold an 8 ½ x 11” sheet of cardstock or heavy construction paper in half OR cut the sheet to a smaller size, then fold in half, making a strong crease on the fold line.
  2. Holding onto the folded side of your paper with one hand, give the top of your paper a decorative trim. Still holding the folded side with one hand, begin cutting 1” in from the open side, starting at the bottom of your paper. Let the outside edge guide your cutting line. STOP when you are about 1” from the top of your paper. Turn the corner with your scissors and cut across the paper, toward the fold. STOP about ¼” from the fold!
  3. Repeat the cutting from the bottom of your paper, always moving over about 1” from your previous cut before beginning. You can make your vertical and horizontal cuts straight or decorative. Making lines and curves, play around with each sculpture you create, giving your pieces some variety!
  4. When you have made 3-4 cutting lines, depending on the size of your paper, open up your paper and lay it on a flat surface. You can decorate your paper, front and back, using stickers or scraps of paper.
  5. Turn your paper into a 3-D sculpture with a few folds: Beginning on one side of your sculpture, fold the top “leg” TOWARD the center, creasing a new fold at the end of your scissor cut (where you stopped about ¼” from the main fold line). The next “leg” should be folded BACKWARD in the same manner. Continue, folding each leg ... front, back ... in this alternating pattern. Do the same thing on the other side, BUT the top “leg” will be folded backward. Continue the folding pattern ... front, back, front.
  6. Display your 3-D sculpture by working with the “legs” and folds to make it stand. Make a few more, varying the size of your paper, cutting lines, and decorations to grow your piece into an artistic stabile (a freestanding abstract sculpture) that POPS!

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPxBwVPqYR4&list=PLxg4vmuqrAtckvp9eurSG…

In this project, you make two different paper airplane designs and then test out each one to determine which one will fly the furthest.

Supplies:



  • Two pieces of paper for airplanes
  • Markers or crayons to decorate
  • Pencil and paper to record your results

Directions:

Plane Design #1- Classic Glider

  1. Fold your paper hot dog style.
  2. Lay the paper out in front of you, portrait style.
  3. Fold the top-right corner to the center crease, lining up the edges and creating a triangle.
  4. Do the same thing with the left corner.
  5. Fold the right side again, along the crease.
  6. Do the same thing with the left side.
  7. Fold the plane inwards, in half, so the previous folds are on the inside.
  8. Fold back one side so the edges align.
  9. Flip and repeat with the other wing.

Plane Design #2- Speed Glider

  1. Fold your paper hot dog style.
  2. Lay the paper out in front of you, portrait style.
  3. Fold the top-right corner to the center crease, lining up the edges and creating a triangle.
  4. Do the same thing with the left corner.
  5. Fold the point of the plane down, creating a fold along the bottom of the corner triangles. The tip should be about ⅓ of the page from the bottom of the paper.
  6. Fold the top-right corner to the center, about one inch above the tip.
  7. Repeat with the left corner. This should create a small triangle at the point.
  8. Fold the small triangle up.
  9. Flip your plane over so that your folds are on the table.
  10. Fold your plane in half, left side onto its right, so the edges line up.
  11. Fold the top wing down so your edges align.
  12. Flip and repeat with the other wing. Once you have completed your planes. Test them out in an open space, like your backyard or the park. Make a chart and compare each of your planes and how far it flew each time.

Watch these airplane projects at: https://youtu.be/QdronFgR0Yc?list=PLxg4vmuqrAte4QgWzVQ7oInsSnnMkwcil

Supplies:

  • Pattern or picture of design
  • 4ft of craft lace
  • Key Ring
  • Scissors
  • Pony beads
    • 35 green
    • 15 blue
    • 6 yellow
    • 4 orange
    • 2 black

Directions:

  1. Tie your craft lace to your key ring, leaving two legs of equal length.
  2. Look at the top line of your pattern, and find pony beads to match that line. If you’re using the bird pattern, the first line will be 3 green beads.
  3. String those beads onto one of the legs of craft lace, in the order you see them on the pattern. (This may not matter for the first line, but it’s important later on!) Push the beads up to the top of the craft lace, next to the key ring.
  4. Now, string the other leg of craft lace through beads in the opposite direction of the first leg. Pull the craft lace all the way through. Reposition the line of beads so that they form the bottom side of a craft lace triangle, with the keyring as the triangle’s top corner. When you’re done, you should have to two equal lengths of craft lace again, one on either side of the line of beads.
  5. Repeat steps 2-4 with every line of your pattern.
  6. When you’re done, tie a knot in the craft lace at the bottom of your design, and trim any excess length. Good job!

Watch this project at: https://youtu.be/T6w5u62hrp0?list=PLxg4vmuqrAtckvp9eurSGEI2DwSb1wI6o

Sufia immigrated to the United States after meeting her husband, Joshua Davidson. He is a soldier at Fort Carson and met Sufia in her home country of Afghanistan. The two were married in 2009 and in the first six years of their marriage had two beautiful children.

Sufia loved her new home and life but was still missing one thing she really wanted: a job. While attending GED test preparation classes at Pikes Peak Library District (PPLD), she was visited by Lacey Miller, PPLD’s Library Instruction Designer. Lacey told Sufia’s class about a new training opportunity: Food Industry Training. The certification program prepares participants in an intensive four week format to become qualified line and prep cooks.

“Miss Lacey told us that with this class you could learn lots of skills and you could find a job in the restaurant industry,” Sufia said. “I wasn’t sure I could do this, but then I talked to my husband. He told me to go do it because in my home country, I wouldn’t have an opportunity like this because I am a woman.”

Sufia enrolled in the program and began her intensive training during May 2019. Now, she’s a Food Industry Training graduate and working in a prominent Colorado Springs hotel.

Sufia DavidsonThe Food Industry Training program is recognized by the Pikes Peak Workforce Center and several other workforce centers in Colorado as an approved training option. Students learn the foundational skills necessary in the food service industry, such as: kitchen safety, knife skills, basic math, recipe reading, and cooking methods. Food safety and sanitation are part of every class. Real world life skills, including dependability, adaptability, memorization, time management, and team work are also of great emphasis. Work readiness skills like resume preparation, job search, and interview practice and preparation are included, too. Food Industry Training graduates have been hired by The Broadmoor, The Mining Exchange Hotel, UC Health hospitals, senior living centers, and others.

In the past, the Food Industry Training program has generously been hosted in kitchens at other organizations throughout the city. But, without a deep freezer, gas line, and necessary appliances, students have been unable to experience the full scope of working in a commercial kitchen and our program offerings have been limited to times when kitchen space was made available to us. This year, and with your support, PPLD is bringing this program in house with the renovation of kitchen space at Library 21C. Turning this space into a state of the art kitchen will help us grow and improve the Food Industry Training program and create new food education programs for our patrons. These programs, when we have been able to offer them, have been wildly popular!

In the time of COVID 19, when millions of Americans are experiencing joblessness and uncertainty, PPLD is proud to offer programs that will help members of our community get back to work. The Food Industry Training program helps not only individuals like Sufia, but area restaurants and businesses that are hurting in the aftermath of this public health crisis.

Will you support PPLD, and programs like Food Industry Training, by donating today? We serve you, your family, friends, and neighbors and exist to provide resources and opportunities that impact individual lives and build community.

Supplies:

  • A container filled with water
  • Various objects of different sizes and weights - examples: beads, rocks, pennies, small plastic toys

Directions:

  1. Drop in objects and observe the effect on the water
  2. Discuss what you see. Do you notice a ripple? Does it make a splash? What happens if you drop in lots of objects at once?
  3. Discuss how our behavior and actions also have an effect on the world around us.
  4. Make a list of acts of kindness you can do.
  5. Spread the ripple effect of kindness!

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHM_X3wcmfQ&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5…

Supplies:

  • Paper
  • Scissors
  • Glue stick
  • Hole punch
  • String
  • Stapler
  • Markers
  • Streamers (optional)

Directions:

  1. Fold a piece of paper in half hamburger style.
  2. Use a marker to mark one quarter of the way in on the creased edge.
  3. Take the top left corner of the top half of the paper and bend it to meet the mark you just made.
  4. Do the same with the opposite corner to create the "wings" of your kite. Take care not to fold the paper flat, you want the paper to form a funnel for the air to move through when you are pulling your kite.
  5. Staple the corners in place. You now have the body of your kite.
  6. Use a hole punch to create a hole behind the staple.
  7. Decorate! Use cut paper and markers to turn your kite into an animal, add streamers or long strips of paper to the back.
  8. Tie a string into the hole punch.
  9. You're ready to fly!

Watch this project at:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIivPH2CcOc

Supplies:

  • 2-3 purple cabbage leaves
  • 4 cups water
  • Blender
  • Strainer
  • Bowl
  • Paper towel
  • Several clear containers or cups
  • Vinegar
  • Baking soda
  • Optional: liquid dishwasher detergent, fruit juice, clear soda or carbonated water, soap, salt, other kitchen substances (with grownup approval)

Directions:

  1. Tear 2 to 3 leaves off the head of a purple cabbage, tear leaves into smaller pieces.
  2. Put cabbage leaves into a blender with about 4 cups of water and with a grownup's help, blend on high until the liquid is very purple with a few chunks remaining.
  3. Strain cabbage juice into mesh strainer lined with paper towel, over a large bowl.
  4. Pour the cabbage juice into a container or pitcher. This purple cabbage juice is now your pH indicator.
    Purple cabbage juice contains a compound called anthocyanin. Anthocyanin will turn pink when mixed with acid, blue-green when mixed with a base, and purple when mixed with a neutral substance, such as water.
  5. Take 3-4 additional clear containers: add a spoonful of baking soda to one cup; add a few spoonfuls of vinegar to a second cup; add a bit of water to a third cup.
  6. Ask your grownup if you can use a small amount of dishwasher detergent into an additional cup.
  7. Now, you'll add some cabbage juice to each of the four cups you've prepared, even the one that's just water. When the purple cabbage juice is mixed with vinegar, what happens? (You should see the mixture turn pink.) Why? Vinegar is an acid. Pour cabbage juice into the container with baking soda, then also the cup with the dishwasher soap. What is happening to these two solutions? (Baking soda is a base, so it will turn bluish-purple. The dishwasher soap mixture should turn a vivid blue-green because dishwasher soap is very basic, or alkaline.) What happened when you added cabbage juice to just water?
  8. Line your four cups up on the counter. You will use these color results to compare other substances you want to test to see if they are acids or bases.
  9. Pink indicates an acid. Place this cup to the left. Purple (water) is neutral. Place this one in the middle. Blue-green is basic. Place this cup to the right of the purple cup. If you used dishwasher detergent, place this cup to the very far right. It’s one of the most alkaline substances you will find in a kitchen.
  10. Now, try adding purple cabbage juice to other substances you want to test.
  11. Compare the colors of your test mixtures and place them between the cups, where you think they should go. Soon, you will have a spectrum of acids and bases and you can compare the acidity of two substances, such as vinegar vs. orange juice.

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nB1UzYZf4s&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5…

Supplies:

  • Cotton balls
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup water
  • Large mixing bowl
  • Food coloring
  • Baking sheet
  • Small bowls or cups
  • Either cooking spray or tin foil
  • An adult to help with the oven

Directions:

  1. Mix 1 cup of flour with 1 cup of water in the large bowl.
  2. Get your baking sheet ready by spraying it with baking spray or covering it with tin foil.
  3. Divide the flour and water mixture into 4 to 6 small bowls or cups, depending on how many colors you want.
  4. Add 5 to 8 drops of food coloring to each cup and mix well. Remember that you can make different colors by mixing the food coloring; red and yellow make orange and blue and red make purple.
  5. Dip each cotton ball into a cup. Be sure to cover the whole cotton ball with the mixture – make it nice and thick.
  6. Set the coated cotton balls on your baking sheet.
  7. Let an adult help you with this part. Bake your cotton balls in a 300 degree oven for about 45 minutes.
  8. After that, take the cotton balls out and let them cool completely – at least an hour. They should have a nice, hard, crunchy shell.
  9. Find a small hammer, a toy hammer, or even a rock. Take your cotton balls outside and - SMASH THEM WITH THE HAMMER! That’s right – smash away.

Extra fun:

Use more cotton balls to make a baked sculpture. Use the same dipping method, but keep the sculpture in the over a little longer – about 55 minutes. You can make and smash a crunchy monster!

To watch this project visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mvw4q6cr6xY&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5…

Colorful Experiment #1

Supplies:

  • Milk
  • Plate
  • Liquid Food coloring
  • Dish Soap
  • Q-tips

Directions:

  1. Pour the milk into a plate until you cover the bottom surface.
  2. Add drops of food coloring in middle of the milk in the plate.
  3. Coat the Q-tip in the dish soap and dip it in the milk. Watch what happens!

The science behind this reaction has to do with the way the soap molecules and the fat from the milk are interacting. Fat is hydrophobic, a type of molecule that repels water. By adding the soap, we are breaking up the hydrophobic fat particles and holding it inside the soap.

Colorful Experiment #2

Supplies:

  • Hard coated candy
  • Plate
  • Warm water

Directions:

  1. Put the candy pieces in the plate. You can place them around the edge, or any other design you can think of!
  2. Add some warm water to the plate, making sure that there is enough to cover the bottom of the plate. Watch what happens!

The science behind this interaction has to do with the warm water dissolving the color coating on the candies.
Each of the candies has a slight difference in the sugar content, which means they have different densities; they all take up a different amount of space. The reaction we are seeing here is called stratification, where water splits due to differences in the density of the materials.Try cold water and even different kinds of candy. What happens?

Watch these projects at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9geJ7KdXqK0&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5…

Black Lives Matter and so we celebrate Black Voices in stories for children. These picture books are available at the Pikes Peak Library District. Click on the pdf link below to see the booklist.

Celebrating Our Home, the Pikes Peak Region

Early in 2020, Makers Liz Kettle and Ruth Chandler of Textiles West set out to teach community members how to create fabric collages to celebrate the beauty of our Pikes Peak Region and share stories of our home and community. A week into the Spring Residency, everything came to a halt due to COVID-19.

Rather than stop the Textile Art Project altogether, Liz and Ruth transformed it into a virtual format, so that our community could be creative and stay connected even while sheltering at home. In many ways, the finished compilations are a record of our community and our shared experience during this unprecedented time. We’ve compiled all the finished pieces submitted by local community members into a Flickr album, which you can explore here.

MIR Collage

You can also see the pieces in person as part of a rotating display by visiting the following libraries during the months listed below. At the end of the display rotation, the piece will live at Monument Library.

Even though the Spring/Summer Textile Art Residency has come to an end, you can still create your very own collage! This project is traditionally a textile (fabric) project, but Liz and Ruth have adapted the project to use just about any materials you have at home. Get started by looking through the various PDF project patterns (see below) and reading through this tutorial PDF. This will give you a basic idea of the project and let you know what supplies you’ll need to get started.
Then, watch the video below to see Liz explain how to get creative and pull it all together! (Please note the video cuts off at the end, but all important content is included.) Links to supplementary videos examining various stitch types are also available below.


Patterns

Supplementary Videos

The Makers


Textiles West's teachers are all experts who know the power of creating and understand that for many, textiles are a much more accessible art form than traditional art forms.

Liz Kettle

Liz KettleThrough her work, Liz Kettle tells tales that are personal as well as those that speak of relationship, humanity, and the earth. She chooses a nontraditional palette of fabric and stitch because she believes they connect us and draw us closer in a way that cannot be achieved with traditional art materials alone. Liz uses a variety of techniques drawing from the deep wells of quilting, mixed media collage, and paint to tell and support each unique story.

Liz is the co-founder and Director of Textiles West, a Textile Art Center that aims to inspire widespread awareness, participation, and appreciation of textile and fiber arts.

Liz is passionate about teaching and is a co-author of two books; Fabric Embellishing: The Basics and Beyond and Threads: The Basics and Beyond. She is also the solo author of First Time Beading on Fabric, Layered and Stitched and Know Your Needles. Liz has articles published in Quilters Home, Quilting Arts, Quilting Arts In Stitches and Cloth Paper Scissors Studios, and has appeared in the PBS show Quilting Arts TV.

Ruth Chandler

Ruth ChandlerRuth Chandler grew up in Japan where the vibrant color and texture of Japanese fabric, combined with the simplicity of Japanese design, caught Ruth’s attention. Ruth learned basic Sashiko from an elderly neighbor and at the age of four, and began to create and sew her own clothes at the age of ten which became an outlet for her imagination and creativity.

She made her first quilt in 1990, a queen size, hand-appliquéd and hand-quilted Hawaiian pineapple quilt, and she has never looked back. In her own unique style she loves to use new techniques mingled with the old and her work usually shows the influence of her years spent in Japan. Shibori, Boro, Sashiko, and indigo dying are her love, however she also teaches garment sewing and other classes to children and adults.

Ruth teaches locally at Textiles West in Colorado Springs, and nationally at Art and Soul Retreats. Ruth has written several articles for Quilting Arts magazine, blog posts for Havels’ Sewing, and has work published in several books. Additionally, Ruth is one of the co-authors of the best-selling book, Fabric Embellishing: The Basics and Beyond, and is the solo author of Modern Hand Stitching.

Ruth may be contacted for nationwide classes at ruthachandler@comcast.net

Shadow Art

Supplies:

  • Animal toys
  • Blocks
  • Large paper
  • Marker
  • Watercolors or crayons

Directions:

  1. Set up toys and blocks in a sunny area outside, preferably on a hard surface.
  2. Put a large piece of paper next to the toys and position it so that the shadows of the toys can be seen on the paper.
  3. Trace the shadows with a thick, black marker.
  4. Try tracing several times throughout the day to track how the shadows change shape as the sun travels across the sky.
  5. Add watercolors or crayons to make your shadow art come to life!

Nature Crowns

Supplies:

  • Two long strips of paper 1 - 2 1/2 inches wide
  • Colorful paper
  • Cardstock
  • A pencil
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Stapler

Directions:

  1. Draw petal and leaf shapes on your colorful paper. You can create templates for your petal and leaf shapes by drawing on a thick paper, cutting out the shapes, and tracing it onto the colorful paper.
  2. Cut out flowers and leaves.
  3. Use glue and/or stapler to attach the long strips of paper.
  4. Glue on flowers leaves.
  5. Wrap your crown around your head to find the right length for you and then glue or staple it together.
  6. Your nature crown is now ready to wear!

Time Capsule Envelope

Supplies:

  • An envelope
  • Paper for writing or drawing
  • Markers or colored pencils

Directions:

  1. Decorate your envelope, write Summer Solstice 2020, and a include a future date when the envelope can be opened.
  2. Take some time to write about what today means to you. What are your hopes and dreams for the future?
  3. Take a walk and collect some nature treasures to include in your envelope, draw a picture, add in anything else you’d like!
  4. Put in a safe place to store until it can be opened again.

Watch these projects at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jy4f4OV_KJ8&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5…

Have an adventure with Pikes Peak Library District this summer! Our Summer Adventure presented by Children’s Hospital Colorado game helps kids and teens stay engaged and active over the summer months. We know you’re looking for engaging activity ideas, and we are here to help!

Anyone ages 0 - 18 can participate and win prizes through reading, moving, and imagining. Either participate in one of our programs or use one of our activity ideas!

Tails & Tales 2021
Click here to get signed up!



We value your feedback.

Please take a short survey about your adventure and be entered to win an iPad!


Activities and Programs for KIDS! (Ages 0 - 12.)

Activities and Programs for TEENS! (Ages 12 - 18.)


The adventure runs from June 1 – August 14. You can set up your account June 1 at ppld.beanstack.org.

Beanstack FAQs: ppld.beanstack.org/faq

Click here for group registration information.

Have more questions about Beanstack? Email beanstackhelp@ppld.org.


Be in the know!

Sign up to receive emails for summer virtual programs, activities, and more for ages 0 - 18 in June, July, and August. You can unsubscribe at any time.


Calendars


Game Cards

You can track on the Beanstack app, In District Discovery: Summer Edition, pick up a game card at any library location or participating distributors, or click here to download and print a physical game card from home! (en español)

Participating Distributors: (Begins the week of May 24th)


How to Play the Game

  1. Complete an activity (either Read, Imagine, or Move) any day from Tue., June 1 through Sat., Aug. 14 to earn points.
  2. Record the dates you complete an activity on a printed game card, in Beanstack, or using the calendars in District Discovery: Summer Adventure Edition. You can log your progress at ppld.beanstack.org or by using the Beanstack App, available in Google Play or the App Store.
  3. You earn 1 point for each activity. You will receive a prize for participating in the game and a prize when you reach 45 points (45 days of activities). You’ll also be entered into the grand prize drawing at 45 days of activities.
  4. Bonus Round: For every additional 10 activities you complete after finishing the game, you earn 1 additional entry into the grand prize drawing. You can earn up to 3 additional entries into the grand prize.

If you need assistance, call (719) 531-6333 or visit ppld.org/ask to find different ways to get in touch with our staff.


Enliven your virtual presence with Summer Adventure digital backgrounds: Download below!


Summer Adventure Game Prizes

  • Registration Prize:
    • Ages 0 - 3: An animal finger puppet
    • Ages 4 - 12: A color-changing cup with lid and straw
    • Ages 13 - 18: A choice of book or journal
  • Completion Prize:
    • Ages 0-12: A choice of book
    • Ages 13-18 A choice of book or journal
  • Grand Prize Drawing:
    • Ages 0 - 12: A gift certificate to Kiwico crates*
    • Ages 13 - 18: Chromebook®*

*There will be multiple winners throughout the District. Residents of El Paso County are eligible to win the grand prize.

Get your District Discovery at your library today! Print it in Spanish here!


Colorado Springs 150th: The Story of Us

Congratulations to our winners and participations!



The winners are listed below. You can also visit our Facebook page to see an album of the winners.

  • Bridged by Ashlin L. - Best in Show

  • Puppy Love by Hannah G. - First Place, High School Division
  • The Light That Guides Me by Adyline P. - Second Place, High School Division

  • The Seasons of Coming Together by Sydney H. - First Place, Middle School Division
  • The Turtle by Micah L. - Second Place, Middle School Division

  • Reflections by Riley W. - First Place, Coordinator's Choice
  • A Timeless Moment by Kaylee M. - Second Place, Coordinator's Choice

Thank you to all who entered, and watch this page for information on our 15th annual teen art contest, coming out December 2021!

Given our stand against racism, along with the continued national and local conversations, we want to highlight and celebrate the Shivers Fund.

Clarence and Peggy Shivers created the Shivers Fund at Pikes Peak Library District, in concert with PPLD, in 1993. They introduced the Shivers African American Historical and Cultural Collection at PPLD, which continues to expand annually thanks to the Shivers Fund and its many supporters. In addition to the collection, the Shivers Fund at PPLD also provides opportunities for our community to celebrate history, culture, and the arts. The Fund hosts concerts and other events, as well as helps expands educational and cultural opportunities for young people to encourage tolerance and diversity.

Our Library District and Foundation applaud the Shivers Fund for its continued investment to create more tolerance, diversity, and community in the Pikes Peak region.

Learn more about the history and work of the Shivers Fund.

Supplies:

  • 18 gauge jewelry wire
  • 200 or so beads (pony beads, jewelry beads, or any beads that will fit on your wire)
  • Small wire cutters
  • Small pliers or other tool for bending the wire
  • Piece of string or ribbon for hanging

Directions:

  1. With the wire cutters, cut two lengths of 18 gauge wire about 24 inches long and 6 to 8 more shorter pieces about 3 inches long.
  2. Wrap the two long pieces of wire around a round bottle or jar that has a circumference of about 7 inches, then release the wires. They should fall into a loose spiral.
  3. Using the small pliers, twist one end of each spiral into a small circle. This is so that your beads will not fall off.
  4. You’ll need 65-75 beads to fill the length of each of the two spirals. If you work with a partner, you can each choose beads for one spiral. (These will be sun catchers when you’re finished, so make them pretty!)
  5. When the spirals are full: Using the small pliers, twist the top end of each wire into another small circle to hold the beads on.
  6. Loop the piece of string or ribbon through both spirals at the top so they hang together.
  7. Now, using the small pliers, attach one end of each of the short pieces of wire along the length one of the two spirals and fill each one with beads, leaving enough wire to attach the other end to the second spiral. Space the shorter pieces out evenly. These should make what looks like a spiraling ladder with beaded rungs along the length of the ladder. It helps to have a partner to hold the spirals for you while you work.
  8. You have made a beautiful DNA Sun Catcher! Hang your DNA double helix model in the window to remind you how beautiful and unique you, and each of us, are.

THE SCIENCE: DNA is short for deoxyribonucleic acid. Long strands are connected by genetic material to form a double helix. Inherited traits from your ancestors are located in your DNA. DNA is found in all living organisms.

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FuTVAt31POw&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5…

Supplies:

  • Paper, any color
  • Cupcake liners, large and small
  • Markers
  • Glue
  • Buttons or stickers
  • 5" pieces of pipe cleaners or twist ties

Directions:

  1. Flower: flatten a cupcake liner. Fold it in half and trim around the edge of the liner, cut the edge so that it's scalloped like a flower petal. On the colored paper, using a marker, draw a stem. Glue the center of the back of the flattened, cut liner at the top of the stem. For a leaf, cut a flattened cupcake liner into small slices. Cut the edges of two slices, making them more pointy at the end like leaves. Glue onto the stem of your cupcake liner flower.
    Cut a smaller cupcake liner and glue to the center of your flower. Add a button or sticker to the very center of your flower. Bend edges of flowers outwards for a 3-D effect.
  2. Dragonfly: fold a quarter of a liner in half and in half again to make a long skinny triangle. Cut the edge again in a curvy way. Open it up and cut it down the middle. Cut each piece down the middle again. Take two small pieces and glue onto the paper to make the wings, add a piper cleaner bent double and twisted together for the body, leaving the ends free for antennas. Glue onto paper between the wings.
  3. Sideways Butterfly: Take a quarter of a cupcake liner and fold once. Cut a curvy edge. Pinch the liner piece in the middle so that it sticks up in the center. Do another. Glue both onto the paper just at the edges and place two twisted pipe cleaners cut short, or twist ties below the wings, leave the ends free to be antennas. For a front facing butterfly, take four quarters of a cupcake liner and cut wavy edges. Place and glue on the paper, with two on each side, add a pipe cleaner in the middle, leaving the ends as antennas.

Watch this project at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmHgRfJ-FPk&list=PLMEg2Dd0dSFctLfDQxsL5…

PPLD commits itself to join the efforts of all who share its mission of building a community free of racism, hatred, and intolerance. Our full statement is below:

Providing resources and opportunities that impact individual lives and build community – that is the mission of Pikes Peak Library District. Our community, like others across the nation, is hurting. Just as it is our mission to build community, it is our duty to speak against the forces that would tear us apart.

The killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery have reminded all of us once again that the battle against racism and intolerance is not over. For many individuals, those forces are a constant in their lives, and that battle is waged on a daily basis. For those of us who do not experience the burden of systemic racism, events such as these may briefly ignite an urgent desire to seek justice and true equality for Black members of our community. All too often, though, we allow that sense of urgency to gradually disappear until the next horrific act of violence occurs. This cycle must stop.

PPLD stands with those in El Paso County and throughout our country who are exercising their Constitutional rights to protest against systemic racism, inequity, and violence against the Black community. As a public library, we stand for the innate equality of all we serve. We pledge to do our part to help our community realize that diversity, inclusivity, and equity are pillars of a strong and thriving community and that if even one individual is harmed through injustice or racism, our entire community suffers. This is not the time to simply move on until the next act of violence jars us from our complacency. PPLD commits itself to join the efforts of all who share its mission of building a community free of racism, hatred, and intolerance.

- John Spears, Chief Librarian & CEO, and Debbie English, President of PPLD’s Board of Trustees (June 5, 2020)


Pikes Peak Library District stands with our Asian American and Pacific Islander community and remains committed to building a community free of racism, hatred, and intolerance. (March 19, 2021)

For kids:


PPLD has curated a list of resources for our community.
Click here to find links to national and local news coverage, deeper background on the issues, books, and other items here.


Let's Talk about Racism: Digital Book List

The African American Historical and Cultural Collection, funded by the Shivers Fund at PPLD

Let's Talk about Racism: Teen Collection

Let's Talk about Race and Racism: Children's Collection

Celebrating Black Voices: Picture Books


Social and Systemic Injustice Movies on Kanopy
Catalog links from booklist below:
Additional Resources
For Adults:

For Kids: