What's New!

Freading

Pikes Peak Library District has a brand new eBook platform called Freading that will supplement the eMaterials already available to patrons through its Overdrive vendor. What’s so special about Freading? Freading uses a simultaneous use model, meaning more than one person can check out materials at the same time. If 100 people in El Paso County want to read Water for Elephants, then they can have it. Everything you see in Freading is available for checkout.

Freading can be accessed through the Library’s CyberShelf page, or directly at http://pikespeak.freading.com/. It uses Adobe Digital Editions to handle Digital Rights Management for its collection. Once Adobe Digital Editions is downloaded to your computer, click on “Login” at the top right corner of the page to enter your library card number and PIN. Then you’re free to download any of the eBooks you see. These eBooks can then be moved over to most eReaders via USB cable, if you prefer to read your book in that format.

There are a few main points to remember about Freading:

  • Freading uses a token system. There is no platform fee for the library to offer Freading; the library only pays for the items patrons check out. To keep spending in check, each patron receives five tokens per week they can use to check out materials from Freading. Any unused tokens roll over each week for four weeks. At the end of four weeks, the tokens reset back to five. Freading books check out for two weeks and patrons can renew their selections with a single token.
  • Freading has apps for Android and iOS users which can be accessed through PPLD’s mobile app link on CyberShelf: http://ppld.org/mobile-mayhem
  • Freading doesn’t work on Kindles, although it will work on the Kindle Fire.
  • Additional information is available at CyberShelf Help.
Comments: 0
Maurice Sendak: 1928 - 2012

Beloved children's author Maurice Sendak died May 8 at the age of 83. Best known for his award winning book, Where the Wild Things Are, Sendak transformed the face of children's literature.

Here is a list of Sendak's books in PPLD's collection.

Comments: 0
2012 Dr. Seuss Writing Contest Winners Announced

Winners for this year’s Dr. Seuss Writing Contest have been announced. They will receive a gift card to Barnes and Nobles and read their story for broadcast on PPLD TV. This contest was sponsored by the Friends of the Rockrimmon Library.

Ages 6 - 9
1st place:
Sydney Tucker
2nd place: Eliana Diaz

Ages 10 - 13
1st place:
Hillary Schiff
2nd place: Elise Van Arsdale

Comments: 0

Zooglobble, a popular and comprehensive website for kids' music news, reviews, and interviews, has selected a PPLD TV production as one of the Top 10 Kids Music Videos of 2011: "Bartleby Finkleton Will Not Take a Bath”, written and performed by Colorado Springs musician Steve Weeks.

Comments: 0

We're sad to hear of the loss of Whitney Houston. What an amazing voice. Whether you're a new fan or a follower from the 80s, you can download up to three of her songs for free from Freegal. All it takes is your library card number and PIN.

Comments: 0
PPLD Expands Genealogical Resources

Pikes Peak Library District Special Collections is thrilled to be the newest FamilySearch affiliate library. PPLD patrons now have convenient access to the wealth of genealogical resources available through FamilySearch, the world’s largest repository of genealogical records. These records are stored on microfilms at the famous Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

You can request this microfilm using the convenient ordering system at http://www.familysearch.org/films. There is a nominal fee of $5.50 per reel to cover shipping and handling. Once the film arrives at PPLD Special Collections, patrons can use the microfilm readers in the department to view it and make photocopies. Special Collections staff can help patrons see what is available and help with questions regarding film orders.

Comments: 0

Here is Arjun Gheewala’s film A Lame Story, an entry in PPLD’s 2011 Teen Filmmaker Festival. His movie artfully demonstrates the power of books.

Submissions were required to have the following elements:
Theme: Adventure
Word: Rosebud
Object: Cape with the color red somewhere in it
Place: Library

Comments: 0

Each year, the Millibo Art Theatre (formerly Manitou Art Theatre) presents The Six Women Playwriting Festival. The mission of the festival is to present theatre that explores the human experience and the human spirit through the examination and presentation of dramatic work.

PPLD TV captured the 2011 festival performances. Below, you can watch Off to Summer (Written by Tira Palmquist; Directed by LeAnne Carrouth; Performed by LeAnne Carrouth and JaNae Stansbery). To view the other plays, click here.

Comments: 0
Goodreads

You can join Pikes Peak Library District's Goodreads group to find out what PPLD patrons and staff are reading and share your own reading selections! You can read and post book reviews, join discussions, and discover upcoming literary events in this free and fun online group.

Click here for detailed instructions on how to create an account, join our group, and add books to our shelf.

Click here to visit PPLD's Goodreads group.

Comments: 0
Photo by Jerilee Bennett, The Gazette

The Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship is presented each year to a librarian whose primary focus is genealogy and local history. PPLD’s own Tim Blevins was chosen as the 2011 award recipient for the contributions he’s made to the District since arriving in 2001, including his work with the Pikes Peak Genealogical Society and the popular annual Regional History Symposium. The award is a huge honor for the District and a public recognition of the important work PPLD’s Special Collections Manager has done over his 10-year career with PPLD.

Blevins was also recently featured in The Gazette:
History comes alive, thanks to award-winning librarianThe Gazette, August 13, 2011

Comments: 0
Featured Homeschool Family--Trcka Family

How old are your children?
We have three boys. They are 11, 9, and 6 years old.

Why did you decide to homeschool?
Homeschooling was never something I dreamed of doing. Quite the contrary, I dreamed of the day I would send them off to school and lighten my load at home. We moved here after the Kindergarten year had started for my oldest. We didn’t know what neighborhood or school district we would settle in, so we just decided to homeschool Kindergarten, since it’s not even a ‘required’ grade. For first grade, he attended the public school that we intended to be our neighborhood school in Black Forest. Due to delays, we were still commuting the next year, but his brother was in half-day Kindergarten, too. After 2 months of driving to the school 3 times a day, being in the car 3 hours a day, it just became simpler to homeschool until our home was settled, at least. Well, now we’re settled and somewhere along the way we worked out the kinks and frustration of homeschooling, feeling like I didn’t have a clue what I was doing, and we came out the other side committed to long-term homeschooling and loving the flexibility and adventures it allows our family to have.

What curriculum do you use?
I don’t have a single set curriculum. I’ve always used the internet as a huge teaching resource, as well as library resources, and LOTS of good books. I used to follow what the state education standards were for individual grades. With multiple grade levels, though, it has become easier and more enjoyable for our family to combine some subjects, like History, Art, and Latin. We have used “The Story of the World” audio CD’s from the library, as well as Veritas Press for elementary history. After a few years homeschooling, I did a lot of research on homeschooling methods and discovered that I was basically a Charlotte Mason-style teacher with a little bit of Classical method thrown in.

I start formal math in first or second grade using Saxon math. They’ve done well with this program, and my oldest has worked independently with this since 4th grade. Anything that one child can do on their own is a good thing and allows individual teaching time for another child. Before second grade, there are plenty of hands-on math activities that include the standards in the books without the ‘sit still and listen to me lecture’ style of a textbook.

Science is nature journals, gardening, raising animals—we have 3 dogs, 2 cats, a bunny, 14 chickens, 4 goats, and a red golden pheasant, lots of experiments (I have a degree in Biochemistry, from my previous life), and a little bit of Bob Jones University Science workbooks.

My older two children are enrolled in the Cottage School Program at The Classical Academy East one day per week. This gives them the opportunity to experience a classroom setting, participate in a music concert and an art show each year, plus group classes such as Ameritowne that just aren’t possible at home. They are learning very thorough grammar there using Shurley Grammar.

What does your homeschool day look like?
The kids get up at various times, so everyone is on a slightly different schedule. My early riser has on rare occasions had breakfast and completed Math, History, and Grammar before anyone else is even downstairs yet! Generally, we will have breakfast and rotate through individual subjects for a couple of hours, take an outdoor break (or basement if there’s weather), then complete a short assignment or chores while I fix some lunch. After lunch, we do much more relaxed studies together and can include sketching video lessons, reading, building, craft projects, dog training, handwriting, animal care, etc. In the later afternoon, we will all get together in the living room for a snack and tea time along with a good audiobook or audio history lesson. We always keep maps and globes handy for when we are reading or listening about places so we can find them. In the evenings, after dinner we will do a short bible study around the table. Bedtime includes everyone piling in our bed for read-aloud novels, poems, or stories.

Does your husband support/help you in a specific way in your homeschooling efforts?
My husband has warmed to the idea of homeschooling as he sees them thriving and doing well on the state required testing. He travels occasionally for work, so it has been great that we can come along on some of the longer trips. We’ve been coast to coast seeing museums and field trips this way. He is also active in Boy/Cub scouts, 4-H, and occasional soccer & hockey teams with the kids. He’s been supportive by building chicken coops, dog kennels, shelving for homeschooling supplies, and accommodating more chaos and less clean than might be achieved if we didn’t homeschool!

What are your children’s interests and future goals?
They love climbing on anything, building forts, swinging on a rope to reach the sky, playing with creatures big and small, and would all love to become Lego Master Builders someday.

Comments: 0
Featured Homeschool Family--The McKinney's

I have 3 children: ages 14, 12, and 9.

When my firstborn child was about 15 months old, I accompanied a friend to a homeschool conference. I'd never even heard of 'homeschool'! I went more to hang out with a girl friend than anything else. While there I heard a speaker talking about how God has given our children to us as a gift. The more he talked about the relationships built with one's children through homeschooling and the equipping done for real life in homeschooling, the more I knew this was something I was being called to do.

I have been what is sometimes referred to as an 'eclectic' homeschooler, using a variety of curriculum to meet the changing needs of my children and our family. I've always felt I should teach a subject in a way that is enjoyable and many times I found unit studies to fit the bill. However, as I now am homeschooling a high school student, a middle school student, and an elementary student, I felt the need to consolidate much of the instruction I give in a 'one-room school house' type setting. I now use 'Tapestry of Grace' as my main curriculum. It is a history based curriculum that adds philosophy, art, geography, government, and writing together. Everyone is learning about the same time periods at their own levels. This enables us all to learn from each other. On top of that, I add Saxon Math, Apologia Science, Easy Grammar, Spelling Power, and foreign language (Latin).

For us, mornings work best to do our harder work. We also try to stick to a schedule so we all work on the same subject at the same time. (That keeps my stress level at a manageable level!) We start with some subjects over breakfast (Bible and History discussions). We move into math, foreign language, language arts (grammar, spelling, and writing) and science before lunch. After lunch we have read-aloud time and more discussions. The day is wrapped up with the kids doing their reading assignments and their household chores.

As my children grow their interests change and it is fun to watch it unfold. My oldest went from a 1st grader who wanted to be a vegetarian children's pastor on a horse ranch...who still ate chicken nuggets (Ha!) to a teenager considering working as a writer or missionary. My second child wants to teach art or choir and be a mommy. My youngest child at one time wanted to be a detective. The problem is, he can't keep up with his own comb! Now he wants to be a wide receiver for the Dallas Cowboys...and a singer! (I guess they don't have to comb their hair. Ha!)

Comments: 0

On June 14, Bomba Estéreo kicked off World Music Series 2010, brought to you this year by KRCC Concerts. The band, which hails from Bogotá, Colombia, describes its sound as “electro tropical.” You can watch the PPLD TV-produced video of the first song of their performance below.

Comments: 0

PPLD TV recently captured this riveting performance of "Summertime" by Indian blues band Soulmate at Venue 515 in Manitou Springs.

Comments: 0

Pages